January 1, 2013

1850 TO 1899 murder leads

this is a draft post published as backup. these are all cases I need more info on. I'm in the process of adding them to the timeline also



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(not sure if this is Ky or Tn) not on timeline

Excerpt from Column 2. Louisville Daily Courier, Louisville, KY. March 30, 1853. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[March 30, 1853] -

Shot. -- A man named Bailey Smotherman, living near the coal banks, on Cumberland river, in Pulaski county, Ky., was shot, about a week since, by a negro named Jim, who was arrested and placed in jail to await his trial. []



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Excerpt from Column 2. Louisville Daily Courier, Louisville, KY. April 18, 1853. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[April 18, 1853] -

SUICIDE.-- A negro named Jim, who was recently convicted in the Pulaski, Tenn., Circuit Court of the murder of Bailey Smotherman, committed suicide by hanging himself in his cell in the jail at Knoxville, on Monday last. []






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added to timeline

Henry T. Harris to Beriah Magoffin,  21 March 1861,  Office of the Governor, Beriah Magoffin: Governor's Official Correspondence File, Apprehension of Fugitives from Justice Papers, 1859-1862,  MG8-104,  Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives,  Frankfort,  KY.  Accessed via the Civil War Governors of Kentucky Digital Documentary Edition: Early Access, discovery.civilwargovernors.org/document/KYR-0001-021-0022, (accessed September 17, 2016).



HENRY T. HARRIS, 
Attorney at Law, 
AND 
GENERAL COLLECTOR.

Stanford, Lincoln County, Ky., 
March 21st 1861
Governor B. Magoffin 
Sir.

Enclosed you will find the description of James Smith, who, about the ^last of^ Feby, in this County, killed Robert Raines — he has fled, and we desire you to offer a reward for his apprehension. The murder was a most unwarrantable one, and the person murdered a young man of great respectability and goodness.

Description. 
He is about five feet 11 inches high — weighs about 165, or 170 pounds, has heavy eyebrows — a sulky look — sandy hair and whiskers, the latter very thin upon his face. ^His eyes are rather yellowish.^ He cannot straighten his right arm, caused by rheumatism. He is about 22 years of age, speaks rather quick when spoken to.,

Yours truly 
Harry T. Harris.


[...]

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added to timeline


Stanford Kenty 20" July 1865
To His Excellency Tho E Bramlette —

Your Petitioner Thomas Purdon would respectfully represent that in the fall of 1864, he was residing in the Town of Stanford where he was borned, and Just after dark it was announced, on the streets that horse theives were in a pasture adjoining the Town of Stanford attempting to catch two through bred race mares the property of W B Withers Mr Withers called upon Petitioner with others to assist him in protecting his property and in capturing the theives, and he together with others run under great excitement to the pasture when Petitioner was directed to gard one string of fence, whilst others entered the pasture and searched for the theives and others still, guarded the other sides of the pasture with the disign of capturing the theves if possible, Petitioner had only for a moment been stationed, at his post and was greatly Excited when in the darkness he thought he discovered some person advancing toward him up the fence, he was guarding; instantly he called out "hault" which was twice repeated and to no Effect as the person still advanced whereupon in the excitement of the Moment he fired, and unfortunately Killed Dick a Slave the property of Joseph McAlister, against whom Petitioner believes no suspicion could attend of Guilty intention to steal the horses aforesaid Petitioner statesd that at the September Term of the Lincoln Circuit Court last he was indicted by the Grand Jury of Lincoln for (Manslaughter) the Malicious Shooting and Killing of said boy — Now Petitioner states he was ^not^ guilty of Murderous intent in Killing said boy, That it was done in excitement of the moment, without any malice whatever, under the honest belief that said boy was the thief who was attempting to steal the two Mares aforesaid of W B Withers, all of which was by Petitioner acknowledged at the time of the Killling

It was a great and Lamentable mistake over which God Knows your Petitioner has been already sufficiently punished The regrets of which will follow him to the grave; but he feels that he is not a fit subject for the state prison, has no proof of his innocence save the facts alone stated, and is unwilling to be convicted upon the records of his native county of Such an Offence, and fears that under the peculiar circumstances of his case such might be the result, and therefore humbly begs your Excellency — will pardon him, for the Offence charged in said indictment, which he feels would be but Just to him, and believes will be approved by the Enlightened public sentiment of the County

Respectfully 
Thos Purdon

Sworn to before me by Thos Purdon this 21st dy of July 1865

S S McRoberts Clk L. C. C.

We the undersigned Citizens of Stanford and vicinity County Concur in the pryer of the above Petition of Thos Purdon and by his Excellency will pardon said Purdon for said Offence charged in the indictment now pending against him in the Office of the Lincoln Circuit Court this 21st July 1865

J H. Bridgewater 
T, W, Varnon 
A G Huffman M D 
W B Berrey J. P. L. C. 
M. V. Smith 
R. G. Craig 
E. S. Fisher 
Wm.A. Pollock 
P H Shanks 
John C. Cooper 
D. W. Vanderveer 
P. M. Talbot 
E. B. Caldwell S. L. C. 
H. T. Harris -- 
James M Shackelford 
G W Heath 
John Bridgewater 
H B Middletin 
H. P. Middleton 
Dayton Tucker 
James Tucker 
Willis G. Thurman 
Henry. R. Thurman 
S S McRoberts clk, L, C, C, 
R. Carson Clk. L. C. C. 
W G Bailey, [P] L C C 
George McRoberts M. D. 
Thos B Montgomery M D 
J. M. Higgins C. L. C. 
J. N. Hughes 
Simon Hicks 
Thos. C. Davis
Peyton Embree 
Mack Huffman 
W R Casson J P L C 
D. R. Camden 
T. P. Douglass 
W. A. Henson 
James Vanhook 
P [Spragens]
A. S. Myers 
W R Warren 
S M. Carver Town Marsh 
R. M. White Jailor 
J. C. Carter Merchant 
Robert R. Gentry, Farmer 
D W V
Lincoln Cir Ct 
vs 
Thos Purdom 

Pardoned & Penalties Remitted 29 Aug /65

Thomas Purdon to Thomas E. Bramlette,  20 July 1865,  Office of the Governor, Thomas E. Bramlette: Governor's official correspondence file, petitions for pardons, remissions, and respites 1863-1867,  BR14-272 to BR14-273,  Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives,  Frankfort,  KY.  Accessed via the Civil War Governors of Kentucky Digital Documentary Edition: Early Access, discovery.civilwargovernors.org/document/KYR-0001-004-2076, (accessed September 17, 2016).

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Stanford 27" August 1865
Govr Bramlette

My Dear Sir I hand you herewith Petition of Thos Purden; you will see it is Signed by all the Leading Citizens in and around our Town, Purdem is a kind boy and Could have had no-Malice toward decedent for the killing of whom he was indicted —

The universal wish of our whole Community as far as I have heard it spoken of strongly favors his pardon — We are again blessed with peace, Quiet, & plenty in this Section of the State

Faithfully yours — 
Y. P. Idell


Tell. M. Page to write me immediately & Let Me Know — results


Y. P. Idell to Thomas E. Bramlette,  27 August 1865,  Office of the Governor, Thomas E. Bramlette: Governor's official correspondence file, petitions for pardons, remissions, and respites 1863-1867,  BR15-64 to BR15-65,  Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives,  Frankfort,  KY.  Accessed via the Civil War Governors of Kentucky Digital Documentary Edition: Early Access, discovery.civilwargovernors.org/document/KYR-0001-004-2242, (accessed September 16, 2016).


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1865? Lincoln County. not on timeline

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-04-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 6, 1877] -

After Many Days. -- Twelve years ago Charles Yocum, then a citizen of this county, killed James Gibson, who lived near where the King's Mountain Tunnel now is. The deadly fray commenced in a trivial dispute, and ended as above narrated. Since that time, Yocum has been a fugitive, and after many hardships and vicissitudes, settled down near Carollton, in this State, married, and now with a wife and five children to share his sorrow and disgrace, he has at last come to judgment. Mr. E. B. Caldwell, who was Sheriff of this county at the time of the murder, learned a short time ago of the whereabouts of Yocum. He started at once for Carroll, and, and assisted by the Sheriff of that county, arrested Yocum, and brought him to jail here. We understand there was a reward offered of $300 for his arrest.



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Excerpt from "Circuit Court Notes." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 4, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-05-04/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 4, 1877] -

Charles Yocum, white, on a trial for murder committed 12 years ago, was given 5 years. []





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1865. Pulaski County. not on timeline

Excerpt from "From Marion County." The Louisville Daily Courier, Louisville, KY. September 26, 1867. Page 4. Newspapers.com.

[September 26, 1867] -


THE ANTI-REGULATORS

...

The leader of this party is James Wilson... He belonged to the State Guard in 1865--killed a man in Pulaski County in that year...










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added to timeline

“Shooting Affray at Somerset, Ky.” Louisville Daily Courier, Louisville, KY. October 5, 1866. Page 1. Genealogybank.com.

[October 5, 1866] -


Shooting Affray at Somerset, Ky. -- We learned of a shooting affray at Somerset last Tuesday, the particulars of which we were unable to obtain. A difficulty occurred between two men named Reed and Howell, in which the latter was shot in the head and mortally wounded by the former. Reed escaped, but was closely pursued by the officers at last accounts. []



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Excerpt from Column 1. The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. October 5, 1866. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[October 5, 1866] -

FATAL AFFRAY AT SOMERSET, KY. -- Our correspondent at Somerset, Ky., informs us of a fatal shooting affair that occurred on Tuesday. He says: "Two young men, named Reed and Howell, got into a quarrel about some trifling matter. Pistols were resorted to, and the difficulty settled by the killing of Howell. At the present writing Howell is not dead, but cannot live but a few hours, as he is shot through the head. Officers are in pursuit of Reed, who immediately fled on the commission of the deed. Several shots were exchanged, two of which took effect, one passing through Howell's hand. I [have?] not learned that Reed was hit."





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added to timeline

"Row in Somerset." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. November 22, 1866. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[November 22, 1866] -


ROW IN SOMERSET.

A Drunken Revel--Killing of a Self-constituted Officer.

[Special Correspondence of the Louisville Journal.]


SOMERSET, KY., Nov. 19.

On Thursday night, at Flat Lick, in this county, a party of disreputable men were assembled at a disreputable house for purposes of debauch. During the night a negro entered the house and made a formal arrest of one of the inmates, by presenting a pistol and in due military form commanding him to surrender, charging the prisoner with having stolen a watch, the property of the ebon officer. The purpose and object of this functionary are not fully known, as they are not disclosed during his brief stay on earth. He, however, held his prisoner in terrorem, till, getting sleepy, he laid down on a bed, pistol in hand, and fell asleep. The prisoner, availing himself of the opportunity, effected his escape. After securing a pistol he returned and found his late captor still slumbering at his post. He thereupon aroused him to a sufficient degree of consciousness to tell him that he was prepared to meet his adversary, and then fired his pistol's contents through the heart of the negro, precipitating him into that interminable sleep that knows no waking. Sic transit gloria mundi.





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Marion or Boyle County. 1869.  not on timeline


"The Gallows Tree." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. August 10, 1869. Page 4. Newspapers.com.

[August 10, 1869] -


THE GALLOWS-TREE.


Lynching of a Three-thousand-acre Farmer near Lebanon.


A private letter received in this city yesterday states that on last Friday night a party of fifteen men, masked and mounted, went to the houses of James Crowders, fourteen miles beyond Lebanon, on the Lebanon and Danville pike, and taking him out a short distance from the house, hanged him to the limb of a tree. The lynchers quieted his wife by holding a loaded revolver to her head.

It is said that Crowders was a very kind old gentlemen, and much esteemed, but there were reports that he was concerned in some large swindles. He was sixty-five years of age. He owned some three thousand acres of land near Lebanon, and before the war owned a large number of negroes.

Within a month, it is said, three men have been taken out and hung by the party that lynched Crowders. []



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1864/1865?  added to timeline

Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News -- Mt. Vernon." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 22, 1878. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1878-03-22/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 22, 1878] -


PENITENTIARY FOR LIFE.

The celebrated case of the Commonwealth vs. David Adkins for murder, was tried for the third time in the Knox Circuit Court last week. The Jury returned a verdict of guilty and fixed the punishment at confinement in the Penitentiary for life. In each of the two former trials a like verdict had been returned, except that hanging was the penalty prescribed. Both judgments were reversed by the Court of Appeals. We are not advised as to whether an appeal will be taken from the present judgment. Adkins is charged with the murder of a woman, and the evidence is altogether circumstantial, though it points positively to his guilt. He was ably prosecuted and defended, a number of lawyers being engaged on either side. The case has excited much interest throughout the mountains. []



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Excerpt from "Two Kentucky Pardons." Cincinnati Commercial Tribune, Cincinnati, OH. November 27, 1883. Page 3. Genealogybank.com.

[November 27, 1883] -


FRANKFORT, KY., November 26-- Governor Knott to-day granted a pardon to David Adkins, of Whitley County, sentenced to the Penitentiary seven years ago for life, for the murder of a woman said to be his wife. The prisoner is dying of consumption, and it is doubtful whether he will reach his home alive. He denies murdering the woman, and says he was amazed one morning to awaken and discover her lying dead at his side, but Sheriff Parton, of Bell County, who was in the city to-day, says not only was Adkins charged with the murder of the woman, but he was also charged with having murdered Thos. Baird, in 1864 or 1865, in Rockcastle County.

The Sheriff says the people of the eastern part of the State are incensed against Adkins for his many outrages, that unless he dies before he gets home, he believes a committee will wait upon him to speed him on his journey. []



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[] Excerpt from Column 1. The Frankfort Roundabout, Frankfort, KY. December 1, 1883. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[December 1, 1883] -


On Monday the Governor pardoned David Adkins, sent to the Penitentiary for life from Knox county for murder. He is sixty years of age and nearly dead with consumption. He was so weak that he had to be taken to the depot on a litter and then carried in the arms of four men into the car. []




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1873? added both to timeline

[] Excerpt from "From Laurel County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 25, 1873. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1873-04-25/ed-1/seq-1/

[April 25, 1873] -

Court being opened and the jury empanneled, they proceeded to business, trying several Commonwealth cases and fining several parties for misdemeanor, and convicting one man by the name of Bodkins of manslaughter sentencing him to the State prison for two years. After this they went into trial of the case which created so much excitement some time back in this county, of Commonwealth against Hannah Sampson for the murder of her step-son, who was found not guilty of the charge by the jury after two days consideration of the facts and arguments. I think she ought to be under many obligations for the manner in which she was defended by counsel G. Pearl, Hon. R. Boyd and C. B. Farris, attorneys.

The argument was opened by C. B. Farris, who made a very able defence, followed by Mr. Pearl who made an able and impressive defence, one hard to get over by the counsel on the part of the prosecution. Mr. Pearl is not surpassed by any man in Kentucky as an attorney at law. The argument was closed on part of the defence by Hon. Robert Boyd, who presented the evidence and facts in a very able way. []



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added to timeline

Excerpt from "Pulaski County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 19, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-03-19/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 19, 1875] -

Yesterday an inquest was held over the remains of a man named Kelly, by Coroner Lester. Verdict, death by violent hands. It appears that he had been missing about nine days. His body was found near the North end of the river tunnel--and had been thrown over Pitman creek bluff. Supposed to have been killed by another Railroad hand who left the country about the time of the murder. The two had a difficulty some time since.



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[] Excerpt from "Home Jottings." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 9, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-04-09/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 9, 1875] -

PICK POCKET AND PROBABLE MURDER. -- On Monday last Frank Green, alias Frank Endwright, was arrested at King's Mountain Tunnel charged with picking the pocket of Thomas Lynch, one of the foreman at the tunnel, of $254. He was searched and $39.90 was found in the lining of his pants, which was identified by Mr. Lynch as his money. In his trial before Justices Gooch and Padgett he admitted the theft but refused to tell what he had done with the balance of the money. He was brought to town and lodged in jail on Tuesday by Deputy Constable John C. Pryde and Thos. McFarland. From these gentlemen we learn that it is supposed that a great many of the robberies that have been committed on the line of the R. R. were made by him. He admitted to the officers that he shoved the man Kelley off the cliff at Point Isabel, an account of which our correspondent at that place gave sometime since. A letter with no name signed, in the handwriting of a woman, and dated at Point Isabel was  found on his person. This letter advises him to leave the country as, steps were being taken to arrest him for the murder. Rewards for his arrest are said to be out at Chattanooga, Nashville, Memphis, Louisville, Cincinnati. Constable Pryde has in his possession a five shooter of the Smith & Wesson patent, taken from Green at the time of the arrest. It has the initial -- To W. P. O., From M. O. P. engraved on it. This is supposed to be stolen, and Mr. Pryde requests us to say it can be obtained on proof of ownership. []





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June 1875. lunsford/langford, goff/gaff. added to timeline

Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News -- Pine Hill." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 18, 1875. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-06-18/ed-1/seq-2/

[June 18, 1875] -

The quietude of Middle Fork, diverging from Pine Hill, was rudely broken last Wednesday by one Peet Gauf shooting David Lunts--the shot taking effect in the left shoulder from which he expired Thursday night. His remains were taken to Broadhead [Brodhead] for interment. Gauf has surrendered himself to Justice McNab.



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Excerpt from "A State of War." Cincinnati Daily Gazette, Cincinnati, OH. April 28, 1879. Page 5. Genealogybank.com.

[April 28, 1879] -

List of killed beginning with 1875, with names of the parties charged with the crimes:  Wm. Lunsford, killed by Peter Goff and A. J. Goff. []


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Excerpt from "Petitions for Pardons." List of pardons granted by Governor Luke P. Blackburn, from September 3, 1879 to March 23, 1881. Kentucky Legislative Documents, Volumes 2 and 3. Pages 5 and 97. Googlebooks.

[October 4, 1879] -

PARDON No. 52.

MT. VERNON, KY., October 4th, 1879.

GOV. L.  P. BLACKBURN:

SIR: I am here holding my court in this county, and at the request of Mr. and Mrs. Goff, I write you in behalf of their son, Peter Goff, who was convicted of manslaughter in this county about four years ago, and sentenced to five years' confinement in the Penitentiary. There were strong palliating circumstances attending his offense, and if his conduct has been such as to not be in the way of his release, I earnestly recommend his pardon, he having served four fifths of his time. I hope you will find it not inconsistent with your views of public duty to turn him out. This will be delivered you by Peter's father and mother.

Respectfully, &c.,
W. H. RANDALL.


October 8, 1879. Peter Goff. 15. Rockcastle. Manslaughter.




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Riddle, Pulaski, 1875. added to timeline

http://www.routonandriddle.org/getperson.php?personID=I25489&tree=routonandriddle

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Excerpt from "Pulaski County News -- Cato." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 2, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-07-02/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 2, 1875] -

MAN KILLED. -- Two men, Anderson Todd, and Aquilla Riddle, living on Buck Creek, about four miles from here, had a difficulty on the 25th, in regard to some chickens that Riddle had engaged around the neighborhood, and which Todd had subsequently bought. The affair did not come to anything serious at the time, but the next day Todd had occasion to go to his fathers for a hammer, and passing by the house of Riddle, he stopped to talk the matter over with him and make friends, as they were brothers-in-law. Riddle was asleep at the time, and Todd waited at the fence till Riddle's wife informed him that he was wanted. He came out and some angry words followed, when Riddle drew his pistol, shooting him in the side, the ball entering about the third rib, lodging near the back bone, from which he died about 10 o'clock, on Monday last. They were both members of the Christian Church, at Stilesville, Riddle has fled, but a reward will be offered for his capture. Justice will, sooner or later, overtake us all. []



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[] Rewards Paid During Fiscal Year Ending October 10, 1876. Annual Report of the Auditor of Public Accounts of the State of Kentucky. Page 77. Googlebooks

[1876] -

Ashley Owens, for the capture and delivery of Acquilla Riddle to the jailer of Pulaski county, under proclamation of the Governor. $200.00. []



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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  April 13, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-04-13/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 13, 1877] -

The entire term of three weeks has been consumed on Commonwealth cases, and the following important ones have been disposed of: Aquilla Riddle for killing Todd, 6 years in the Penitentiary, []



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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 29, 1877. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-06-29/ed-1/seq-2/

[June 29, 1877] -

AFFIRMED.-- The man Riddle, who was sentenced at the last term of the Pulaski Circuit Court to six years in the Penitentiary for murder, and who had his case taken to the Court of Appeals, will have to serve out his term, as that Court has affirmed the decision of the lower Court. []


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Excerpt from "Petitions for Pardons." Kentucky Legislative Documents, Volumes 2 and 3. Page 349-351. Google books.

[1877] -

Pardon No. 275.

Hon. Luke P. Blackburn, Governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky: The undersigned, citizens of Pulaski county, Kentucky, would respectfully pray your Excellency to extend Executive clemency to Aquilla Riddle, now confined in the State Penitentiary on the charge of manslaughter, having been confined in the Pulaski Circuit Court at the July term, 1877, for the period of six years. We are satisfied that his pardon would give general satisfaction to the community.

(followed by long list of names signing pardon, see link in citation)


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1874? Lincoln County. added to 1874 for Ferrell murder and 1878 for election shootout

Excerpt from "Court Items." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 22, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-10-22/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 22, 1875] -

But few cases have been disposed of up to to-day, as the time has been mainly taken up by the trial of Ely, charged with the murder, about a year ago since, of a man named Ferrel, at Milledgeville, in this county. The trial occupied about three days, and up to the hour of going to press the jury is still out. []


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Excerpt from "Court Items." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 20, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-10-29/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 29, 1875] -

Ely, whose case, on a charge of murder, we mentioned last week, was acquitted--the jury remaining out only a short time.  The cases of alleged particeps criminis, Hall and Gresham, were continued.



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Excerpt from "Court Items." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 10, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-12-10/ed-1/seq-3/

[December 10, 1875] -

The cases of Bridgewater were all continued until the regular April term. Also the cases of Hal and Gresham. []



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Excerpt from "Circuit Court." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 21, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-04-21/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 21, 1876] -

The cases of the Commonwealth vs Grisham and Hall, charged with killing Ferrel, at Milledgeville, some time ago, were continued at the present Term of the Court. Mike Ely, one of the three men charged with the killing, was tried at the last Term of the Court, and acquitted. []


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Excerpt from "Circuit Court." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 28, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-04-28/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 28, 1876] -

Sixty-two indictments were returned by the Grand Jury, mostly for misdemeanors.

The trial of Wm. Grisham, charged with the murder of Jos. Ferrell, at Milledgeville, some time since, has occupied the Court for the last three days. A great deal of testimony against the accused was elicited, and we understand that some tall swearing has been indulged in. The defense was ably represented by Messrs. Hill and Alcorn, and Saufley and Warren, and most masterly prosecuted by Commonwealth Attorney Denny, assisted by Col. Breckenridge. At half past six o'clock, last evening, the case was given to the Jury who, after retirement, reported that it was likely that they would finally agree, and at half past seven, they were dismissed by the Judge to appear again this morning. Grisham was detained in Jail last night. []



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The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 5, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-05-05/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 5, 1876] -

OFF. -- As we had no Sheriff last Tuesday, Jailer Tom Buford, with his guard, started off to the Penitentiary at Frankfort, on that day, with Bridgwater, Gresham and Yancy. After entered the cars, chains were placed around their legs to insure their safe arrival. Bridgwater was demure and crest-fallen, and seemed as tho' all hope had fled from his heart of gaining his freedom again. Gresham took in the situation at a glance, and will have two years in which to brood over the killing of his fellow man. Gus Yancy, wore the same dont-care-a-continental tinker look, which always accompanies him, and went off with a smile of apparent complacency, amid the good-bys of a score or more of his colored race who had gathered at the depot, as usual. []


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[] "Hustonville." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. March 3, 1878. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[March 3, 1878] -

HUSTONVILLE.

Bloody Affray at the Primary Election Yesterday--Two Men Mortally Wounded--Another Shot Through the Arm--Others Injured.

[Special Dispatch to the Courier-Journal.]

SHELBY CITY, KY., March 2. -- At the primary election in Hustonville, Lincoln county, this afternoon, two men, Ely and Anderson, were shot and mortally wounded. Mr. James Moore was shot through the arm. Some others, whose names are not known, were injured in the row. []



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Excerpt from "Excerpt from Lincoln County -- Hustonville." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 8, 1878. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1878-03-08/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 8, 1878] -

A BLOODY ROW.

Election day afforded scenes of a character not quite so harmonious. Matters went off pretty quietly, however, until the line had been formed, and the counting in the Assessors’ contest was in progress. Suddenly the report of a pistol was heard, followed by twelve or fifteen shots in rapid succession. The scene of confusion was at once beyond description; but intensely amusing. Youth and manhood, and hoary age, feeble attenuation, unwieldly corpulency, and tottering decrepitude rivalled each other in feats of astonishing activity. No English hunter ever cleared a five-barred gate in more dashing style—no charging squadron ever breasted with more crushing shock the obstacle that would oppose their mad career—no trained tactician ever spread his force in fan like rays with more electric speed than did the startled Sovereigns on that memorable day in Hustonville. The facts, so far as ascertained, are these: Your readers will remember that some year or more ago, a man name Ferrill, was shot and killed at Milledgeville, at the house of Mike Ely. Ely, Gresham and Hall were tried on the charge of homicide. Ely and Hall were acquitted, and Gresham sentenced to the State Prison, from which he is now returned. It is thought a feud has existed between the parties ever since the Milledgeville affair. On Saturday the belligerents, who supported rival candidates, were standing in contiguous lines. An altercation arose, ostensibly from a disputed vote, and immediately Gresham and Ely were fired upon by two of the opposing party. Ely was struck in the breast and disabled by the first fire. Gresham succeeded in drawing his pistol after he had been twice shot at, and soon cleared the street. Six persons are known to be wounded, viz: Mike Ely, through the lungs, dangerously; George Ferrell, in the forearm, ranging from the wrist to the elbow; J. Moore, in the hand; a brother of Gresham, in the arm; ---- Anderson, in the back, and George Frye, Jr., by a straggling ball, in the leg. Anderson was peculiarly unfortunate. He had taken refuge behind a large tree on the side on the street when one of the Ferrells wounded and pursued by Gresham, reached the same tree and pushed him out. Anderson, who happened to be dressed like Ferrell, fled down the street, pursued by Gresham who mistook him for the man he had been after, and fired with great vivacity, hitting him just as he turned off the Street at the Drug Store. It is strange that so much firing in so dense a throng could do so little damage. If every man who fell over gates and through fences, had been wounded, our force of Surgeons would have been inadequate. Big Jim McKinney and Dr. Fowler deserve special mention, or will do so when they shall have repaired Dunn’s yard fence. Doc. Alcorn, who is very active, sought to take refuge behind Kauffman, but Frank carried off his 350 pounds at such a rate that Doc. could never reach the sanctuary. Two or three fellows who had been deeply and boisterously drunk for some hours, were sobered instantaneously. The whole thing was of foreign growth and can reflect no dishonor on our peaceful village.  []


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Excerpt from "Lincoln County -- Hustonville." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 15, 1878. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1878-03-15/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 15, 1878] -

POSTPONED.

The trial of Gresham was commenced last Saturday, but on account of the nonappearance of important witnesses, was continued until Saturday next. The other parties are still at large. []



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Excerpt from "Lincoln County -- Hustonville." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 22, 1878. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1878-03-22/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 22, 1878] -

ACQUITTED.

The trials of Moore and Gresham two of the actors in the election tragedy came off on Saturday last. Both were acquitted. []




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1874? Lincoln County. added to timeline

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 31, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-03-31/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 31, 1876] -

Gov. McCreary has pardoned Joseph Hughes, who was sent to the Penitentiary from this [Lincoln] county, for four years, on a charge of killing a negro man near Stanford, in 1874. Mr. Hughes has been in prison 17 months. He arrived at home last Friday, and those who have seen him say he looks as well as he ever did. []




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1874? Lincoln? added to timeline

Excerpt from "Casey County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 3, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-12-03/ed-1/seq-3/

[December 3, 1875] -

John Saunders, charged with killing his father, who has been running at large for several years, was arrested in Green county, and lodged in Liberty jail last Sunday evening. His trial has not come up yet. []



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Excerpt from "State News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 12, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-05-12/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 12, 1876] -

We learn that John Saunders, who is charged with killing his father, Robert Saunders, in Lincoln county, about two years ago, and who broke jail about four months ago, at Liberty, has been seen in that county, and pursued by the officers of the law, but up to this time has not been recaptured. Rumor says that the County Judge, Sheriff and the minor officers, are on the hunt for him, and that their intention is to arrest Bill Wilson also. --[Times & Kentuckian. []








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The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 10, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-12-10/ed-1/seq-3/

[December 10, 1875] -

The notorious Bill Wilson, whom our readers will remember as having jumped from the train while on his way to the Penitentiary, is said to have been shot in Casey county, and dangerously wounded. It is difficult to get any one to arrest him. He will probably make his escape. A gentleman from this county, while hunting in Casey county, the other day, came up suddenly on a camp where Wilson and several of his palls were stationed, all of whom, were armed, and they drew their guns down on him, and he left instanter. The gentleman recognized Wilson, so there can be no doubt of Wilson being in the county, and wounded. []



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The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 17, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-12-17/ed-1/seq-3/

[December 17, 1875] -

So far as we have been enabled to learn, the escaped convict, Bill Wilson, is safe in his forest home among the woods and hills of Casey county. It is a shameful comment upon the officers of our State, that a man who has been found guilty of murder, can thus escape arrest and punishment. []



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The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 24, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-12-24/ed-1/seq-3/

[December 24, 1875] -

We don't know it to be true, but give the report as we heard it. The other day a man was riding through the tangled forests of Casey county in search of cattle, when "all at once" he came upon the secluded camp of the notorious Bill Wilson, where he and three of his confederates were concealed. They had a picket out on the watch, who called him to a halt and demanded of him his business. On giving them a statement, he was permitted to depart in peace. The man told our reporter that the Wilson's party intended to go out of the county within a few days, and that all the militia of the State couldn't arrest them. This statement may have been mere talk, but it may have been true. []



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Excerpt from "State News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 12, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-05-12/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 12, 1876] -

We learn that John Saunders, who is charged with killing his father, Robert Saunders, in Lincoln county, about two years ago, and who broke jail about four months ago, at Liberty, has been seen in that county, and pursued by the officers of the law, but up to this time has not been recaptured. Rumor says that the County Judge, Sheriff and the minor officers, are on the hunt for him, and that their intention is to arrest Bill Wilson also. --[Times & Kentuckian. []







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1874? Garrard. not on timeline

The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-08-20/ed-1/seq-3/

W. S. Miller kills W. I. Rochester. also see Pg 2


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December 1874. Lincoln. not on timeline.

Excerpts from "Court Items." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-10-29/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 29, 1875] -

Scott Graves, a young man, a native of West Virginia, charged with killing Buford Gwinn, at the Tunnel, in December last, has been confined in jail here since the fatal occurrence, on a charge of murder. The case is a most unhappy and unfortunate one. They were both under twenty-four years of age, and had been close friends for years; the young man Graves having lived for several months in the family of the father of Gwinn, and they attended school together for the time. It may be remembered by many of our readers that during the month of December last, Graves, Gwinn, Bishop, and perhaps another man, got into a friendly scuffle at King's Mountain Tunnel, and, being "hot-blooded" the "triffling scuffle" ended in anger, with the death of Gwinn and the wounding of Graves. The latter was immediately arrested and had an examining trial, which resulted in his being sent on to the April Circuit Court to answer an indictment for murder, and bail fixed, at said term, in the sum of $2,000--in default of which he was remanded to jail. His trial began on Tuesday last, before the following jurymen: Frank Owsley, G. N. Bradley, John White, R. Cobb, J. S. Owsley, T. D. Hill, J. H. Hocker, S. W. DeBord, Jas. Dudderar, L. M. M. Powell, J. H. Rout, J. T. Hackley.  It took but a short time to find a jury, as so few persons had heard of the killing. The father and several friends of young Gwinn were present, not as prosecutors or persecutors, we learn, but to see that justice was done. After a full investigation of the facts, the jury, having retired to their room to deliberate upon the case, returned a verdict of not guilty, which gave almost universal satisfaction to those who heard the case and knew the facts.

Scott Graves, charged with murder, was allowed to go before the grand jury, last Tuesday, and he preferred such charges that one Bishop was indicted for shooting him, Graves. Bishop has fled the country, we learn. []



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1875. Garrard. not on timeline

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-08-27/ed-1/seq-2/

col 1. Mary Pointer kills Liz Searsborough

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The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 1, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-10-01/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 1, 1875] -

Nichols, who was tried at the late term of the Boyle Circuit Court for the murder of a man named Peach, was found guilty of murder in the first degree, and his punishment fixed at death by hanging. We learn that a motion was made by his counsel for a new trial, which was not granted, and he has taken an appeal to the Court of Appeals. This will defer the execution of the death penalty for nearly, or quite, a year. []




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1875. Lincoln County. added to timeline

Excerpt from "Home Jottings." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 25, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-06-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[June 25, 1875] -

KILLING AND WOUNDING. -- A considerable amount of crime and misdemeanors has occurred at and around King's Mountain Tunnel since the road began. Last week a man named Payne, a watch and jewelry mender, got into a difficulty with some negroes there which resulted in Payne's killing one of the men and slightly wounding another in the arm. Payne was also severely wounded in the shoulder. He fled for safety to this place. The ball is still in his shoulder. We have since learned that some 8 or 10 negroes attacked Payne, and that he shot entirely in self-defense. The case was dismissed by the Commonwealth Attorney at the preliminary trial, on grounds of justifiable homicide. Payne should in future keep out of bad company. []




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1875.  Lincoln County. added to timeline

Excerpt from "Lincoln County News -- Crab Orchard." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 10, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-09-10/ed-1/seq-3/

[September 10, 1875] -

On Monday morning last, a little altercation took place between the wives of Ben Goss and David Locket, colored. Goss interfered, either to assist or separate, when Locket struck him with a stone, from which he died in less than two hours. Locket surrendered himself to the proper officer. His trial is set for Wednesday, at 9 o'clock.

LATER. -- The examining trial of David Locket for killing Ben Goss took place Wednesday before Squire Burch and Judge Pollard. He was pronounced guilty of murder, and is now in jail awaiting the sitting of the next term of the Circuit Court. []



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Excerpt from "Home Jottings." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 17, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-09-17/ed-1/seq-3/

[September 17, 1875] -

David Locket, of color, who killed the negro man, Ghost, at Crab Orchard, the other day, and who was refused bail by the Examining Court at that place, was brought before Judge Lytle here, on the 11th, by writ of habeas corpus, and allowed bail in $400 for his appearance at the October Circuit Court, which was given. Col. W. G. Welch, represented the prisoner, and County Attorney, Bobbitt, the Commonwealth. []



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Excerpt from "Circuit Court." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 20, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-10-20/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 20, 1876] -

Something over a year ago, Dave Lockett killed Ben Goss, both men of color, at Crab Orchard. The facts are, that the wives of the two men had a difficulty the day before the killing, and the next day the wife of Goss and Goss himself and his mother-in-law had hold of Lockett's wife, whereupon Lockett ran up to them and picked up a very large rock, held it in his hand and struck Goss a violent blow, which resulted in his death in about one hour. Lockett was indicted for manslaughter, and his case was tried at the present term of the court. Lockett was ably defended by Col. W. G. Welch and W. O. Hansford, Esq., and was prosecuted with a [?] by County Attorney Bobbitt and Commonwealth Attorney Denny. The latter made one of the strongest speeches against the prisoner, that we have heard in this county against any criminal. The jury failed to agree, and were discharged. []


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Excerpt from "Circuit Court." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 19, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-10-19/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 19, 1877] -

David Lockett, colored, who killed another colored man named Yoss, in 1875, was tried on a charge of manslaughter and sent to the Penitentiary for 18 months. This case had been tried before and resulted in a hung jury. []





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1875? Pulaski. added to timeline

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 14, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-04-14/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 14, 1876] -

Jim Gillispie who killed O'Brien, a year or more since, got eight years, []



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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  April 21, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-04-21/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 21, 1876] -

The Sheriff of Pulaski, with the following batch of recruits for the Penitentiary, took the train here for Frankfort one day this week: Jas. Gillispie, sentenced for 7 years for manslaughter; Mose Barnett, for hog stealing, 2 years, and Dan Kyle, manslaughter, 16 years. []




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1875? Garrard? not on timeline

The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-10-22/ed-1/seq-2/

Andy Conn kills [?] Arnold

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Nick Morrison / William Gooch.  Lincoln Co. 1875? added to timeline

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  October 5, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-10-05/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 5, 1877] -

ANOTHER MURDERER WHO COMES AND GOES AT HIS PLEASURE.-- We learn from those who are acquainted with him, that Nick Morrison who, two years ago murdered Wm. Gooch, at Milledgeville, in cold blood, got off the train here on Monday and staid around town the whole evening, apparently as unconcerned as if his hands were free from the blood of his fellow man. We do trust that our officers will see that Stanford, at least, is kept clear of the presence of murderers and other evil doers--except to be shut up in our dismal jail. []



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"In Jail." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 16, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-11-16/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 16, 1877] -



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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 22, 1878. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1878-03-22/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 22, 1878] -

CIRCUIT COURT.-- It is but little over three weeks till Circuit Court, and then comes the tug of war. There are five murder cases to be tried: Holmes, for the murder of Sheriff Napier; Saunders, for assassinating the colored preacher, Middleton; Morrison, for the murder of young Gooch, two years ago; Jerry Brown, colored, for the murder of Mr. John Engleman, and William Oakes, for assassinating 'Squire Petre. The prisoners at Louisville, and the one at Richmond, will be brought here, and we understand it is the intention of the authorities to employ a guard of a sufficient number that will serve during the whole trials. These will be armed with the needle guns and pistols, and will be on hand at all hours. We incline to the opinion that this will be a much better arrangement than for the Sheriff to have to hunt up a special guard for each day and night, and besides it will be infinitely more satisfactory to the public generally. Of course there is no great fears of any attempt at rescue, but forewarned is forearmed, and our officers are going to profit by the experience of the past. Affairs are in good shape in this county now, and it only remains for the Jurors in the coming Court to remember their oaths and punish the offenders to the full extent of the law. We have heard of a number of cases where Juries, through fear or favor, have acquitted criminals, or what is nearly as bad, hung, and allowed the murderer to go at large. Don't let this be repeated, but show the officers you are for a full execution of the laws by doing your own duty. []



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Garrard County. December 1875. not on timeline

Excerpt from "State News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 7, 1876. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-01-07/ed-1/seq-1/

[January 7, 1876] -

About two weeks since, Mr. Jake Davis, an old bachelor residing at the mouth of Paint Lick, was taken out of his house and hung by a band of five ruffians until life was nearly extinct when he was cut down and made to tell where he kept his money. Having got possession of his money, which is variously estimated from five hundred dollars to a thousand, the robbers and would-be murderers hung him up again and left him hanging. A negro who lived with Mr. Davis, ran to a neighbor's house and told what was going on, when the neighbor hastened to the scene of attempted murder in time to save the life of the victim. Two of the robbers, Bud May and James Polk Butner, have been arrested, tried and held over in the sum of $1,000 each, for their appearance at the Circuit Court in Garrard county at its next term. Brak Walker and John Murphy, his brother-in-law, both of Madison county, the other parties who participated in this atrocious crime, are still at large, though a reward of $400 has been offered for their arrest. -- Jessamine Journal. []


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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  March 31, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-03-31/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 31, 1876] -

It is stated that the gun used with such fatal effect in the late shooting affray at Paint Lick, had contained then exploded, during six years. This is a canard--nobody will believe that a gun ever remained undischarged for six years in Garrard.




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The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 26, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-11-26/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 26, 1875] -

BURGLARS SHOT. -- Four negro men had made a plot to burglarize several stores in Danville, the other night. One of them gave information to the proprietors of the intended raid, and the stores were watched. During the night four of them attempted to enter a store when they were fired upon by the guard and two of them were thought to have been mortally wounded. It is a little singular that the negro informant would go with the others and risk being shot himself. He was captured, however, and is now in jail. The other negroes assert that he planned the burglary himself, but this seems strange in the light of the facts of the case. []



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Excerpt from "Home Jottings." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 3, 1875. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-12-03/ed-1/seq-4/

[December 3, 1875] -

One of the negro burglars who was shot in Danville last week, died last Wednesday, and the other will recover. The negro Robertson, the informant, was taken to Somerset, on a charge of murder and burglary. He seems to be a bad scamp. []




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1875/1876? Pulaski Co. added to timeline

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 14, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-04-14/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 14, 1876] -

The negro Kyle, who murdered young Prentiss, the clerk of P. F. Smith, Railroad contractor, was sent to the Penitentiary for 16 years. Mr. Denny says that while it was the general impression that the negro should be hung, no stronger case than manslaughter could be made out against him. []



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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 21, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-04-21/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 21, 1876] -

The Sheriff of Pulaski, with the following batch of recruits for the Penitentiary, took the train here for Frankfort one day this week: Jas. Gillispie, sentenced for 7 years for manslaughter; Mose Barnett, for hog stealing, 2 years, and Dan Kyle, manslaughter, 16 years. []


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Boyle County. 1876. not on timeline.

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 21, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-04-21/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 21, 1876] -

The negro, Jim Turpin, who committed an outrage on a little daughter of Mr. James Irvine, aged eight years, at Perryville, last week, was taken to Danville, and placed in jail. A party of masked men took him out last Friday night and quietly hung him to a limb near town, where he was found dead the next morning. []




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McFerran / McPherson 1874/1875. same case? railroad hand died from his wounds? or two separate victims? Pulaski. added to timeline


Excerpt from "Pulaski County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 9, 1874. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1874-10-09/ed-1/seq-2/

[October 9, 1874] -

Wesley McFerron, who was brought to our town from Mt. Vernon, one day last week, upon a warrant for stabbing a railroad hand in our county, a few months since, made his escape from the guards and is now running at large.



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Excerpt from "Pulaski County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 24, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-09-24/ed-1/seq-3/

[September 24, 1875] -

Wes. McFerrin, lies in jail under a charge of killing a negro on Cummings' work. []



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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 31, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-03-31/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 31, 1876] -

McFerran, who is accused of murder in Pulaski, and who was brought for safe keeping to the Jail here, was taken back to Somerset, by Jailer Shepperd, on last Tuesday, for trial before the Circuit Court now in session at that place. []



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Excerpt from "Pulaski County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 6, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-10-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 6, 1876] -

Circuit Court is still in session and although it has been busy all the time, no cases of importance have, up to this time, been decided. The case of McFerran for murder, is now (Wednesday) in trial, and will consume the remainder of the day. The Commonwealth made out quite a strong case against McFerran, and it is likely, if the jury don't hang (which is very probable) that his sentence will be severe. []



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Excerpt from "Pulaski County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 13, 1876. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-10-13/ed-1/seq-2/

[October 13, 1876] -

After a session of two weeks, occupied almost exclusively in commonwealth cases, our Circuit Court adjourned on Saturday last. As we predicted, the jury, in the McPherson murder case, hung. It therefore became a bailable case, and, now, having given bail, McPherson, the reputed slayer of a number of others besides the unfortunate negro, for whose murder he was tried, goes forth again after an imprisonment of six or eight months in jail, to his bloody work. The Church Advocate ought to employ him now as a regular correspondent. He gets up such a mournful tale, at least, the letters he used to write it from his lonely cell, (especially the one of the 4th of last July) savors considerably of the mournful.



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[] Excerpt from "Kentucky News." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. July 10, 1877. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

[July 10, 1877] -

SOMERSET Reporter: The called term of the Pulaski Circuit Court for the trial of equity and criminal cases convenes on the 9th inst. There are four murder cases to be disposed of, the defendants being Wesley McPherrin, Sarah Surber, Mary Kinkead, and Davis alias Red Helton, and a case for bigamy against David Rollins. []



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Excerpt from "Pulaski County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 12, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-10-12/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 12, 1877] -

McFerran, who two years ago killed a negro, was tried at the recent term of the Circuit Court and acquitted. []



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1876. not on timeline.

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 21, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-07-21/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 21, 1876] -

Deputy Sheriff J. J. Tate, of Casey county, with a posse, started in pursuit of a gang of horse thieves in that county, the other day, and when they got in range of the gang, were fired upon. Whereupon officer Tate and his party returned the fire and killed a man named Murrel, supposed to be the leader of the thieves, and also wounded another. We presume the Radical papers everywhere will call this another "rebel outrage, and lawlessness in Kentucky."




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Excerpt from "Lincoln County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 21, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-07-21/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 21, 1876] -

Liberty has had a sensation during the last few days. Rumors about the matter are conflicting, but the main facts elicited are about these: It seems there has been a lively business done in that region lately in the way of horse stealing. On last Saturday night John J. Tate, who is canvassing the county as candidate for Sheriff, stopped for the night somewhere about what is called Tennessee Ridge. Before morning he ascertained that his horse was missing. Hastily rallying a posse armed with shot guns, he started in pursuit. Before day they rode up on a party of six men halted in the road. The first intimidation they had of the presence of this party was the explosion of a percussion cap. Tate immediately discharged a load of buckshot in the direction of the faint light emitted by the cap, and killed one of the thieves. A brisk firing by both parties ensued, and continued until all the weapons of the pursuers were discharged. They then fell back to a house in order to re-load, and wait for more light. As soon as they could see they renewed the pursuit, and when they came near the scene of their conflict they discovered a man on horseback talking to another lying in the road. His reply to the summons to surrender was a shot promptly delivered. The whole party fired on him, but he made good his escape, although vigorously pursued for a considerable distance. The fallen man died soon after the pursuers came up. He had refused to give any reliable information. Tate recovered his horse. The marauders were followed into Taylor County, and lost somewhere near Campbellsville. In order to ward off suspicion they seem to have resorted to the ruse of tying one of their number with a rope and pretending they had arrested, and were taking him to jail. This enabled them to pass on without hindrance. The name of the man who was killed is said to be Murrell.



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added to timeline

Excerpt from "Pulaski County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 29, 1876. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-09-29/ed-1/seq-2/

[September 29, 1876] -

Report comes from Cumming's railroad work, that there has been an outburst between the natives [white residents] and negroes. Up to the time our informant left, two or three negroes had been killed, and about two hundred and fifty whites had armed themselves and threatened to drive the last negro from that portion of the country. A parcel of negro gamblers got into a fight down at the Willow Tree on Sunday: pistols were used, and the result was one Radical [Republican] vote less for all time come. There is a regular organized set of gamblers that do nothing else but go along the line of road and rob  the hard-working men of their wages by cheating them at cards and "chuck-luck," and it would be a good thing for the country if all of them were disposed of as was the one at the Willow Tree. []


---

Excerpt from "Kentucky News." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. October 7, 1876. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

[October 7, 1876] -

The Greenwood correspondent of the Somerset Reporter says a young man by the name of Michael Geary attacked Thos. Griffin with a knife and was mortally wounded by a pistol shot from the latter. The same correspondent says, in a difficulty between colored section hands and white citizens one negro was killed and the others driven off, the whites being reinforced by men from Whitley county. []


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Sarah Surber, [?] Surber and [?] Surber Kill Nancy [maiden?] Surber (sister-in-law)
Pulaski County. 1876. added to timeline

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(related????) The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 6, 1876. Page 3. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-10-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 6, 1876] -

MARRIED-- Miss Mary A. Surber, to Berry Dickenson. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Rufus Meece. []



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1876. Page 2. Ancestry.com. Kentucky, Death Records, 1852-1953 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.

[1876] -

Nancy Surber, 19, Murdered. October 17, 1876.

---

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 27, 1876. Page 3. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-10-27/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 27, 1876] -

The most horrible and bloody murder that ever startled a civilized community, was committed near Buncombe, in Pulaski county, last week. The victim was a woman, and the perpetrators of the awful crime, strange to say, are also women, and sisters-in-law of the deceased. The murdered woman, Mrs. Surber, had been left by her husband at home with her little baby, early in the morning, and it was not until four o'clock in the evening that the deed was discovered, and then by a sister of the deceased, who was passing. Certain threats and other suspicious circumstances, led to the arrest of a number of the Surber family, and at the examining trial, three of the women were sent to jail to await the action of the grand jury. The evidence is overwhelmingly against them. The axe and knife, with which the deed was committed, their bloody dresses and hands, all go to show the guilt which they do not pretend to deny. []


---

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 3, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-11-03/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 3, 1876] -

THE SURBER MURDER. --  It is now rumored that the cause of the fiendish murder committed a short time since, in Pulaski, was the fact that the robbers of Mr. Goodwin's store, were known to Mrs. Surber, who threatened to expose them. The threat cost her her life. []



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Excerpt from "Some Pulaski County Items." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 24, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-11-24/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 24, 1876] -

The greatest object of interest, since we last wrote, has been the trial of the writ of habeas corpus, before the County Judge, which was sued out by the Surber sisters. Our readers will remember that they are charged with the bloody murder of their sister-in-law, some time since, and that since suspicion was direct to them, they have been confined in jail. In appearance, the young women are more than ordinarily comely, for their station in life, while one of them is decidedly good looking. When we saw them, and thought of the awful crime with which they are charged, we could scarcely believe it possible for them to have committed it. The trial occupied two days. The judge released two of the sisters, the younger ones, without bail, and sent the oldest one back to jail. []



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Excerpt from "Kentucky News." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. July 10, 1877. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

[July 10, 1877] -

SOMERSET Reporter: The called term of the Pulaski Circuit Court for the trial of equity and criminal cases convenes on the 9th inst. There are four murder cases to be disposed of, the defendants being Wesley McPherrin, Sarah Surber, Mary Kinkead, and Davis alias Red Helton, and a case for bigamy against David Rollins. []



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Pulaski. 1876. not on timeline not a murder

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 26, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-05-26/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 26, 1876] -

We learn that a man named Pollard, was arrested at Crab Orchard, the other day, on the charge of killing his wife. The accused is said to hail from Pulaski county. We have not heard the particulars of the arrest. []



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Excerpt from "State News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 2, 1876. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-06-02/ed-1/seq-2/

[June 2, 1876] -

Samuel Pollard, who formerly lived in Lincoln county, was put in jail in this place last Tuesday, charged with attempting to kill his wife on Monday morning. Mrs. Pollard is a daughter of Berry Ware, of this [Pulaski] county, and has been in very feeble health for some months past, confined to her bed.  She says that about daylight Monday morning her husband tried to smother her to death by putting a pillow over her face and holding it until he thought she was suffocated. He then held her nose with one hand and covered her mouth with the other until she was nearly dead. Her little daughter ran over to her to her grandfather's, a short distance off, and told her grandmother to come to Mrs. Pollard, and Pollard left for Crab Orchard, upon being accused of the crime. Josiah Bishop and Marion Ware (a brother-in-law and brother of Mrs. Pollard) went and brought him back. Mrs. Pollard is in a very critical condition. --[Somerset Reporter. []



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Excerpt from "State News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 9, 1876. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-06-09/ed-1/seq-2/

[June 9, 1876] -

Acquitted. -- Sam'l Pollard, charged with attempting to smother his wife to death, had his examining trial last Saturday, and was acquitted, it appearing evident that the wife had a night-mare. --[Somerset Reporter. []




(what?? how was she in a critical condition if it was only a nightmare? What did the daughter say to the grandfather? Why did he run from the scene? Sounds like a crazy defense of the husband's that the court somehow believed)


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Pulaski, 1876. added to timeline

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 31, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-03-31/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 31, 1876] -

MURDER.-- Last Satur[d]ay night, John Murray, an old man, was murdered on Mr. Flannery's work, on the C. S. R. R. It appears that he had come down on the work to collect a bill from a notorious and disreputable woman, named Cook. A difficulty arose about it, and the woman had Murray arrested. There being no officer near, the Magistrate who issued the warrant, gave Murray over into the keeping of James Hughes, and Simeon Davis, who remained with their prisoner, at Mrs. Cook's. About midnight, as we learn, this Mrs. Cook, determining to make a clean sweep, both of her debt and the old man, leveled a pistol at him, and fired, the ball taking effect. In the scuffle, the woman received a cut across the hand from a large knife held by Murray. Hughes then rushed on Murray, and with a hammer, literally beat his brains out. The murderers then fled, but on Monday, Jailer Shepperd, of Somerset, came across Hughes at Waynesburg, and took him under arrest. []


---

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 14, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-04-14/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 14, 1876] -

The cases of Strunk and Hughes, accused of being accomplices in the murder of Murray, were continued, the parties giving bail at $1,000 each. Strunk was the Constable who had Murray in charge, and it is said, that, for a consideration of $50, he turned him over to the woman Cook, and Hughes, who murdered him. I[f] this can be proven, Mr. Strunk is likely to have a lively time of it. Court will probably not adjourn till this evening. []




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July 1876. Lincoln County. added to timeline

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 2, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-03-02/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 2, 1877] -

Tom Higgins, col'd, who killed another colored man last July, at Mr. Wm. Ball's in this county, has surrendered himself to the custody of the Court, and wishes the charge against him investigated. The last Grand Jurry failed to indict him, for some reasons, coupled with the fact that he had fled the country. His trial is fixed for today. []







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1876? 1877?  Pulaski County. not on timeline

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  April 13, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-04-13/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 13, 1877] -

Parsons was tried on a charge of manslaughter and acquitted. []




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Excerpt from "." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 5, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-01-05/ed-1/seq-3/

[January 5, 1877] -

SHOOTING. -- Tom Baughman, a man of color, shot and seriously wounded his brother-in-law, another colored man. The wound was in the abdomen. The difficulty arose out of a quarrel about the wife of Baughman, who was a sister of the man wounded, whose name is Ben Abrahams. The wife had left her husband, who tried to compel her to return, when her brother interfered, with the foregoing result. []



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Excerpt from "." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 12, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-01-12/ed-1/seq-3/

[January 12, 1877] -

Tom Baughman, the negro man who fired a pistol ball into his brother-in-law last week, had an examining trial on Monday, and was held in the sum of $300 to await the action of the next grand jury, on a charge of wounding with intent to kill. []



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The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 23, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-03-23/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 23, 1877] -

Ben Givens, the negro man shot by Tom Baughman, another negro, sometime ago, died this week. Dr. P. P. Trueheart, his attending physician, had a post mortem examination of the wound, &c., but his discovery, for sundry reasons, has not been made public. The  man Baughman is in jail, awaiting the action of the Circuit Court. []




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Excerpt from "Circuit Court." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 20, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-04-20/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 20, 1877] -

The Grand Jury have found indictments against the following men and their trials have been fixed for the present term on the days opposite their names:

Tom Baughman, colored, murder, 7th day.
Henry Green, horse stealing, 7th day.
Agnes Craig, grand larceny, 8th day.
Wm. Fowler, grand larceny, 9th day.
Andy Gentry, grand larceny, 9th day.
Wm. Martin, murder, 10th day.
Biff Floyd, cutting, 11th day.


---

Excerpt from "Circuit Court Notes." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 27, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-04-27/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 27, 1877] -

The trial of Tom Baughman, col'd, for murder, occupied the Court the greater portion of yesterday, and the arguments having been completed it was given to the Jury at 6 o'clock, and then the Court adjourned till half past 7 1/2 o'clock. []


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Excerpt from "Circuit Court Notes." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 4, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-05-04/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 4, 1877] -

The trial of murder against Tom Baughman, colored, was pending as we went to press last week. The Jury brought in a verdict about 9 o'clock that night, fixing his punishment at 11 years in the Penitentiary. []



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1877. Garrard County. added to timeline

"Garrard County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  January 19, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-01-19/ed-1/seq-3/

[January 19, 1877] -

It is also our painful duty to sully the page with a fresh murder in the annals of Garrard. On Saturday morning a man named Dishon met, and shot dead, George Austin, of this county, on the Crab Orchard turnpike, in front of Mr. John Lusk's residence. A grudge, of some months standing, seems to have made Dishon afraid to move about unprotected, and the affair culminated as above. He has not yet been arrested. Mr. Austin was united in marriage a few months ago, to Mrs. Belle S. Anderson. []



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"Garrard County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 2, 1877. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-02-02/ed-1/seq-2/

[February 2, 1877] -

On Tuesday of the present week David Dishon, who shot and killed George Austin a few weeks ago, and has since been a fugitive from justice, came in and surrendered himself up to the civil authorities, waived an examining trial, and was admitted to bail in the sum of one thousand dollars, to appear at the coming term of the Garrard Circuit Court. []



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"Garrard County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 9, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-03-09/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 9, 1877] -

The town is dull since Court closed. Messrs. Dunlap, Hopper and Noel, are at the Court of Appeals, at Frankfort. Others legal gentlemen are at Danville, attending Circuit Court. In the case of the Commonwealth vs. David Dishon, for the killing of George Austin, the prisoner was found not guilty. []



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Lincoln County. added to timeline

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 9, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-02-09/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 9, 1877] -

FIGHT.-- SHOT GUN AND PISTOLS THE WEAPONS. -- THREE MEN SERIOUSLY WOUNDED. -- Last Saturday a feud that has for some time existed between Povall Sampson and Wm. Martin, culminated almost in a terrible tragedy. The ill feeling grew out of a dispute about the right of a roadway through Sampson's premises. The latter seriously objected to the road and at several points through his farm, put obstructions across it. These, Martin had, previous to the time of the fight, cut down, for which he was abused by Sampson in strong terms. He renewed the obstructions and Martin having occasion to come to town in his Spring wagon, commenced again to cut them away. He was approached by Sampson, who ordered him to desist, at the same time threatening Martin. The latter drew a pistol and told Sampson that if he came any nearer he would shoot-- Sampson remarked that he had no arms, save a barlow knife, was not afraid of Martin, and could run him off with a stick. Martin then fired several times, and finally succeeded in shooting Sampson in the breast, the ball ranging downward to the bowels, and producing a wound that was at first thought fatal. Immediately after he was shot, he called for his gun, which was handed by some one (his son it it reported.) Martin having exhausted his ammunition and seeing his danger, retreated behind his wagon, when Sampson fired, three of the buck-shot striking Martin in the breast and shoulder, and another burying itself in the leg of a man named Dunaway, who was standing at a distance. Sampson then sank down from exhaustion, and friends prevented further trouble. Both of the combatants are seriously wounded, so much so, that a trial of the case before an examining Court had to be postponed. Dunaway is suffering severely from his wound, the ball having batter itself against his shin, split and ranged around the bone into the calf. He will probably be confined for some time. []



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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 16, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-02-16/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 16, 1877] -

The young man Dunaway, who handed the gun to Mr. Sampson who shot William Martin with it, had an examining trial last Monday, and was acquitted without any trouble. The prosecution admitted that there was but little, if any evidence, tending toward his conviction as a particeps criminis.



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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 16, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-02-16/ed-1/seq-3/ (ibid)

[February 16, 1877] -

The trial of Wm. Martin, for the killing of Sampson, was called by the Examining Court, composed of Esquires Carson and Hughes, last Wednesday morning, but as the parties were not ready to proceed, the case was laid over until next Tuesday week, at which time it will be disposed of so far as the preliminary Court is concerned. The prosecution will be conducted by our County Attorney, assisted by several Attorneys from Harrodsburg. The warrant has been altered, and now charges Martin with murder in the first degree. []



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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 16, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-02-16/ed-1/seq-3/ (ibid)

[February 16, 1877] -

Fearing violence at the hands of the friends of young Sampson, who was killed by Wm. Martin a few days since, the latter requested that the officers of the law should have him brought to town for safety. Consequently, he was brought here last Saturday morning, and lodged at the Myers House, under a proper guard. Mr. Martin's wounds are healing rapidly.



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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 2, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-03-02/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 2, 1877] - 

The case of the Commonwealth vs. Wm. Martin, for the killing of Povall Sampson, three weeks since, occupied the Examining Court, composed of Squires Carson & Lynn, from Tuesday, till Thursday of this week. Some forty odd witnesses were summoned, at least thirty of who were examined. A great deal of interest was felt in the case and the desire for punishment of the accused by the brothers of the deceased, led to the employing of Mr. P. W. Hardin, of Harrodsburg, and Mr. G. A. C. Rochester, of this place, to assist Mr. Bobbitt, in the prosecution. Two days were consumed in the examination of witnesses, and on yesterday morning the argument was commenced by Mr. Rochester, followed by Mr. Warren, then by Mr. Hardin, then by Judge Saufley, and closed by Mr. Bobbitt. All the speeches were good, and to the point, and at the close, at a late hour yesterday afternoon, the Court, after a short consultation, decided that the case is not one of murder in the first degree, but a strong one of manslaughter, and sent him on to the Circuit Court, allowing Martin bail in the sum of $1,500. He gave the required bond with a number of responsible sureties, and is again at liberty. []


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Excerpt from "Circuit Court." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 20, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-04-20/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 20, 1877] -

The Grand Jury have found indictments against the following men and their trials have been fixed for the present term on the days opposite their names:

Tom Baughman, colored, murder, 7th day.
Henry Green, horse stealing, 7th day.
Agnes Craig, grand larceny, 8th day.
Wm. Fowler, grand larceny, 9th day.
Andy Gentry, grand larceny, 9th day.
Wm. Martin, murder, 10th day.
Biff Floyd, cutting, 11th day.


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Excerpt from "Circuit Court." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 19, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-10-19/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 19, 1877] -

The case of Wm. Martin for the killing of Mr. Sampson is next on the docket and will be called this morning. []



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Excerpts from "Circuit Court Notes." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 26, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-10-26/ed-1/seq-1/

[October 26, 1877] -

Circuit Court Notes. -- Owing to the difficulty in getting the Martin Jury, and the tediousness of several minor cases, there has been but little done in this Court since our last issue.



The case of William Martin for the killing of Povall Sampson in February last, has occupied the Court nearly the whole of the week. Eighty-three men were examined before the jury could be obtained, then a great many witnesses were introduced, which, added to the fact that there were six lawyers engaged, has made the case thus lengthy. The testimony was completed yesterday morning and the argument of the case begun. Messrs. P. B. Thompson, Jr., Jas. A. Alcorn, and the regular Attorney represented the Commonwealth, and Messrs. J. S. Van Winkle, W. G. Welch and M. C. Saufley, the defendant. All of them made speeches and the case was given to the jury at 5 o'clock last evening, and after a retirement of about an hour, returned a verdict of "not guilty." []




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added to timeline

Excerpt from "Lincoln County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 23, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-03-23/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 23, 1877] -

MORE MURDER IN THE EAST END. -- Quite a serious and fatal difficulty occurred on Tuesday night, at the house of Flora Patton, a woman of no high repute, living about six or seven miles from this place, on the Chappel's Gap and Waynesburg road. It seems that a short time ago, one Wm. Delaney received a note from some unknown parties threatening him with personal violence, for having contracted more than an ordinary fondness for a Mrs. Turner who lived within a hundred yards of Mrs. P. On Tuesday, a couple of young men named Griffin, brought to our Depot, a load of staves, and on their return purchased some of the overjoyful, and having imbibed pretty freely on their way, became slightly, if not wholly how-come-you-so. Reaching Mrs. P.'s about dark, they concluded to stop and have some fun; went in, played the fiddle a while, and at an unexpected moment, heard quite a noise at the door of Mrs. Turner. The young Griffins stepped to the door, and by some, it is said they hallowed, while others say they shot at the supposed KuKlux, at any rate, disturbers of Mrs. Turner. The riotous parties for a short time withdrew, but soon returned to investigate the conduct of the young men in question, and without a moments warning, opened fire--several shots were said to have been fired--when the attacking parties withdrew a second time, leaving one of the young Griffin's wounded in the arm, the other, with a messenger of death lodged in the brain; the ball having entered in, or near the temple. A physician was sent for, who, on the morning following, visited young Griffin, finding it impossible to do any thing for the latter. he told him he was near his grave, and at about 8 o'clock, he died. The former is not seriously hurt, and will soon recover. It is impossible for us to gather the minute details of the horrible affair. But 'tis enough to know that one more man has, from the use of whisky, and base associations, been ushered to an untimely grave. []


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Lincoln County. 12 April 1877.  added to timeline

Excerpt from "Stanford." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. April 13, 1877. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[April 13, 1877] -

STANFORD, April 12. -- ...

FATAL SHOOTING AFFAIR.

E. H. Dawson today shot and killed Samuel Nelson, who was under the influence of liquor and was pursuing him to force the payment of a blacksmith's bill, which Dawson disputed. Dawson delivered himself up this evening and will have his examining trial to-morrow. []


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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  April 13, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-04-13/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 13, 1877] -

MAN KILLED. -- E. H. Dawson shot and killed Samuel Nelson, yesterday, and immediately after the deed, came to town and delivered himself up to the authorities. It seems that Nelson, who was drinking, was very abusive to Dawson about an account and followed him to his home threatening to whip him. Dawson alleges that he kept out of his way as best he could, but was finally caught by Nelson who struck him with great force with an iron bar. It was at this juncture that he shot him, the ball entering the bridge of his nose and producing death in a few moments. The preliminary trial is set for to-day at 10 o'clock. []






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Mary Kinkead?  added to timeline

Excerpt from "Kentucky News." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. July 10, 1877. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

[July 10, 1877] -

SOMERSET Reporter: The called term of the Pulaski Circuit Court for the trial of equity and criminal cases convenes on the 9th inst. There are four murder cases to be disposed of, the defendants being Wesley McPherrin, Sarah Surber, Mary Kinkead, and Davis alias Red Helton, and a case for bigamy against David Rollins. []


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Lincoln County. 1877. added to timeline

Excerpts from "Local News" and "Lincoln County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-10-12/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 12, 1877] -

ANOTHER KILLING. -- Most of our local readers are apprised of the fact of the killing of Mr. Camillus Montgomery, by his brother-in-law Mr. Samuel Owens, on Friday last at McKinney's Station. Immediately after the unfortunate affair Mr. Owens went to Hustonville and delivered himself to the authorities who placed him under guard to await his examining trial on Tuesday last. The facts developed then show that Mr. Owens was entirely justifiable, that Montgomery had previously threatened his life and that on the day of the killing he had drawn his pistol and attempted to shoot Owens. The pistol was taken from him by bystanders but Montgomery renewed the attack with a knife, when Owens drew his pistol and shot him dead. The trouble originated over a debt that Montgomery claimed that Owens owed him and which the latter avowed had been paid. The case was tried before 'Squires Brown and Compton, who, after the hearing of the testimony and the argument of counsel, acquitted the prisoner.


Hustonville.

October 8, 1877.

You have of course had a full account of the unfortunate collision of last Friday at McKinney's Station between Sam. Owens and his brother-in-law, Camillus Montgomery, in which the latter was shot and instantly killed. Owens had an examining trial here to-day, before Esquire Brown. Messrs. Hill, Saufley and Welch, were present on behalf of the defense. A verdict of "justifiable homicide" was rendered. The affair is peculiarly afflictive in consequence of the relations of the parties, and the large number and high respectability of the persons connected with them. []



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Boyle County? 1876?  not added to timeline


Excerpt "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 3, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-11-03/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 3, 1876] -


The last case tried by the court of the present term, was the Commonwealth against A. G. Cosby, charged with the murder of Frank Jackson, in Boyle county, last July. The case was sent here for trial on a charge of venue. The proof developed the facts that the difficulty arose between the two men on account of some disrespectful talk which the man Jackson had said about the wife of Cosby. The difficulty was terminated on the 10th of July, last, at Mitchellsburg, in Boyle county, by Cosby shooting and killing Jackson. Both sides were ably represented by counsel, and after a full argument for and against the prisoner, the jury retired, and after deliberating for some hours, returned in the court room and announced that they were not able to agree, and were discharged. It seems that one juries cannot agree upon a verdict in a criminal case. []


---

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 20, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-04-20/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 20, 1877] -

The case of A. G. Cosby, for murder, was continued for defendant. []



---

Excerpt from "Circuit Court." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 19, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-10-19/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 19, 1877] -


The case of A. G. Cosby for murder was called and continued till 10th day of term. []



---

Excerpt from "Circuit Court Notes." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 26, 1877. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-10-26/ed-1/seq-1/

[October 26, 1877] -

The murder case of A. G. Cosby has been transferred to the Boyle Circuit Court. []



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October 1876? killing or wounding? Lincoln county. not on timeline

Excerpt from "Circuit Court." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 19, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-10-19/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 19, 1877] -


The trial of Ira Logan for the shooting of Clay Powell in Hustonville, in October 1876, was in progress at the adjournment of the Court last evening. []



---

Excerpt from "Circuit Court Notes." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 26, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-10-26/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 26, 1877] -

The case of Ira Logan was on trial then and resulted in a verdict of acquittal. []





------------------------------------------------------------------

1877. Lincoln. added to timeline

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  October 5, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-10-05/ed-1/seq-3/

[October 5, 1877] -

A COWARDLY MURDER. -- On Thursday evening last, Mr. Wm. Petre was waylaid and killed by one Wm. Oakes, in the woods about five miles from Crab Orchard. The facts as we gather them from his son, Jas. B. Petre, are as follows: About a year ago a difficulty occurred between Mr. Petre's eldest son and a Oakes, since which there has been a bad feeling existing between Oakes and the Petres. The Monday previous to the killing the younger son, James, had also a difficulty with Oakes, who swore that he intended to kill him and the whole Petre family. Hearing these threats and believing that Oakes would do violence to his son, Mr. Petre accompanied him while hauling some lumber, hoping by that means to deter Oakes for executing his threat. On Thursday evening of last father and son were returning from Crab Orchard on a wagon and when about five miles from town Oakes raised up from behind a log, where he was concealed and without a moments warning leveled his gun and shot the old man. He died from its effects in less than an hour. Immediately on firing, Oakes threw down his gun and ran and the weapon which proved to be an Enfield rifle, was picked up by the son who in his excitement and frenzy broke it to pieces over the log. Oakes told some of his friends what he had done and then fled the country. Mr. Petre, the murdered man was about 49 years old and was a highly respected gentlemen. It is thought that Oakes has either gone to Campbell county, Tennessee, where he has two uncles living, or to McLean county, Kentucky, where he also has relations. The County Court in session last Monday, petitioned the Governor to offer a reward of $500 for his apprehension, and Mr. James B. Petre, authorizes us to say that he will give $50 for his delivery to the Jailer of Lincoln county. Oakes is thus described: He is about 5 feet 10 inches high, has no beard, has sandy, curly hair, walks erect and proud, has a peculiar grin, and talks through his nose. We hope the officers and others will keep a look out for him. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 2, 1877. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-11-02/ed-1/seq-2/

[November 2, 1877] -


It having been reported that one Oakes, a fugitive from justice, charged with murder in Lincoln county, and for whom a reward of $500 has been offered by the Governor, was in hiding in this  [Rockcastle] county, a party of men went one night last week to the house where he was supposed to be. A diligent search of the premises was made, but no traces of the fugitive were discovered. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 2, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-11-02/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 2, 1877] -

OAKES, THE ASSASIN, CAPTURED. -- One day last week Mr. W. F. Abrahams left home in a quiet sort of a way keeping his own counsel as to the mission of his trip. He returned here on Saturday and surprised every one by bringing with him Wm. Oakes, the man who waylaid and killed Wm. Petre, a month or so ago. Mr. Abrahams says that he had learned from the hints of some of Oakes' friends that he had run off to Franklin county, and on acting on his knowledge he went thither and captured the young man on a farm near Lockport, and about nine miles from Frankfort. He was fencing at the time with two other men, and on Mr. Abrahams telling him to come with him, he did so without resistance. Mr. Abrahams took him up behind him till he could hire another horse and brought him to Frankfort. In Louisville he kept him in his room at the Alexander Hotel, and the next day lodged him in jail here. Mr. Abrahams has showed in this case what most of us knew before, that he is a man of nerve and determination. He will pocket the reward, $500 by the Governor and $50 by a son of Mr. Petre, with the satisfaction of knowing that he has served his county nob[l]y and well. []



---

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 22, 1878. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1878-03-22/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 22, 1878] -

CIRCUIT COURT.-- It is but little over three weeks till Circuit Court, and then comes the tug of war. There are five murder cases to be tried: Holmes, for the murder of Sheriff Napier; Saunders, for assassinating the colored preacher, Middleton; Morrison, for the murder of young Gooch, two years ago; Jerry Brown, colored, for the murder of Mr. John Engleman, and William Oakes, for assassinating 'Squire Petre. The prisoners at Louisville, and the one at Richmond, will be brought here, and we understand it is the intention of the authorities to employ a guard of a sufficient number that will serve during the whole trials. These will be armed with the needle guns and pistols, and will be on hand at all hours. We incline to the opinion that this will be a much better arrangement than for the Sheriff to have to hunt up a special guard for each day and night, and besides it will be infinitely more satisfactory to the public generally. Of course there is no great fears of any attempt at rescue, but forewarned is forearmed, and our officers are going to profit by the experience of the past. Affairs are in good shape in this county now, and it only remains for the Jurors in the coming Court to remember their oaths and punish the offenders to the full extent of the law. We have heard of a number of cases where Juries, through fear or favor, have acquitted criminals, or what is nearly as bad, hung, and allowed the murderer to go at large. Don't let this be repeated, but show the officers you are for a full execution of the laws by doing your own duty. []



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added to timeline

Excerpt from Column 1. The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 11, 1878. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1878-01-11/ed-1/seq-3/

[January 11, 1878] -

Wm. Owsley, a 13 year old boy was shot and killed by Tom Burdett, another colored boy last week. At the examining trial Burdett was sent on, and not being able to give the $500 bail is now in jail.



------------------------------------------------------------------

not on timeline

Excerpt from "Garrard County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 1, 1878. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1878-03-01/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 1, 1878] -

Wm. McCoy, charged with murder, had a change of venue to Lincoln. Sam’l Bird, prosecuted for murder, received an honorable acquittal from our peace-loving jury. 



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Rockcastle. 1877. not on timeline because of possible confusion with next case

Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 30, 1877. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-03-30/ed-1/seq-2/

[March 30, 1877] -

A report comes to us of a shocking murder which was committed last Sunday, in Pulaski county, about ten miles from this place. According to the best accounts which have been given to us of the affair, 

the following are the particulars: On the day mentioned, John Renfro went to the house of one Carlton, and after some conversation with him, asked him a question in reference to a tan-bark transaction between the parties. Carlton replied to the question, when Renfro seized a rock which was lying on the mantel-piece, and struck Carlton with it in the temple, breaking his skull and killing him instantly. We understand that Renfro has left the country, no attempt having been made to arrest him.




---

[] Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 20, 1878. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1878-09-20/ed-1/seq-2/

[September 20, 1878] -


same vs. John Renfro for killing Wm. Carleton. (Renfro is still a fugitive from justice;) []


---

Excerpt from "A State of War." Cincinnati Daily Gazette, Cincinnati, OH. April 28, 1879. Page 5. Genealogybank.com.

[April 28, 1879] -

Ira Carleton, killed by Jno. Renfrue.



-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

who killed who? Renfro killed Henson? (assuming it's the same Renfro evading arrest for supposed Carleton murder? Or is this the same case?) 1878? not on timeline

The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 26, 1878. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1878-07-26/ed-1/seq-2/

[July 26, 1878] -

The Reporter says that Renfro, who killed Ike Henson and escaped, has been captured, and returned to the jailer at Somerset. There was a reward of $300 for him. []




---

Excerpt from "Pulaski News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 2, 1878. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1878-08-02/ed-1/seq-3/

[August 2, 1878] -


ACQUITTED.

Ike Henson, who, some time since, killed Renfro, and evaded arrest, was captured last week and brought here for trial, which resulted in acquittal. []



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false report. not on timeline

Excerpt from "Lincoln County News -- Crab Orchard." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 4, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-05-04/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 4, 1877] -

We are told that an answer to the local in the Courier-Journal announcing the murder of Mr. Schultz, in the vicinity of this place [Crab Orchard], had been sent and never appeared. We think any correction in regard to the crime, connected with this place, should be noticed by the Courier-Journal, as every thing degrading that is committed in Central and Eastern Kentucky, is invariably credited to Crab Orchard. But we suppose the Courier-Journal is somewhat angry at us from the fact, it could not make a lottery of her Crab Orchard salts, and swindle the world as it did the Kentucky Library.




Mr. Schultz, the man who the Courier-Journal had [claimed was] murdered in this vicinity, was found about one mile below the ford in Buck Creek, Monday morning, at 9 o'clock. []





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Wayne County. 1877? not on timeline

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 18, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-05-18/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 18, 1877] -

WAYNE CIRCUIT COURT. -- We learn from Judge M. C. Saufley, who returned from Monticello this week, that the Circuit Court adjourned on Wednesday. There were no very important cases on the docet, most of them being for minor offenses and amounts. Two representatives were sent to the Penitentiary, to-wit: Wm. Wright, for killing ----- Davis, 2 years, and John Hancock, 4 years for arson. Judge Owsley holds his next Court in Russell.






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Casey County. 1876/1877? not on timeline

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 18, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-05-18/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 18, 1877] -



---

Excerpt from "Casey County News -- Middleburg." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 18, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-05-18/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 18, 1877] -



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Excerpt from "Garrard County News." http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1878-09-06/ed-1/seq-3/

---

Excerpt from "Violent Deaths in Kentucky." Louisville Commercial, Louisville, KY. December 31, 1878. Reprinted by Kentucky Explorer magazine.

May 1878
27th - John Corns stabbed Frank McAllister at Greenup. Freeman Farris (colored) shot Robert Land at Lancaster; drunken quarrel.

Sept 1878
7th - A Negro killed John Bailey at Monticello in a quarrel over wages.


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Lincoln County. not on timeline

Excerpt from "Circuit Court." Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 25, 1879. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1879-04-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[April 25, 1879] -


The case of John Ferrell for the murder of Sutton, is set for trial to-day, and Tom Cain for the murder of Hiram Tucker, for next Tuesday, the 8th day of the term. []





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Lincoln County? 1880? not on timeline

Excerpt from "Local Matters." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 12, 1880. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-03-12/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 12, 1880] -

MURDER. -- Constantine Taylor, the man who was so seriously cut and shot by Enoch and Sam Upthegrove,  and Mae Young some time ago, died Monday of his injuries. County Attorney, W. H. Miller, thereupon changed the charge to murder, and ordered the re-arrest of the party, and the Upthegroves were taken and lodged in jail here Tuesday. Young has fled the country. The Upthegroves were taken to the Highland yesterday for an examining trial, but the case was postponed till next Tuesday, and they were returned to jail. []




---

The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 19, 1880. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-03-19/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 19, 1880] -

THE EXAMINING TRIAL.-- Of the Upthegroves' for the murder of Constantine Taylor was called on Tuesday, but postponed until to-day to allow the doctors time to disinter the body and decide upon the immediate cause of his death. Coroner Goode held the inquest yesterday, when the physicians, Drs. Bronaugh and Moore, on examination decided that, although there was a fracture of the skull, in the immediate cause of his death was pneumonia one lung being nearly gone. The jury therefore found a verdict to that effect. []



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[] Excerpt from Column 6. The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 2, 1880. Page 3. LOC.

[April 2, 1880] -

A Fatal Shooting Affray occurred at J. B. Kerby & Co.'s tan-yard, in Rockcastle county, on Monday evening last. W. G. Smith, formerly of Lancaster, and Jas. Hagerty, of Louisville, the former store-keeper and the latter foreman of the tanyard, became involved in a dispute over the breaking of two lamp chimneys in Hagerty's shop by an employee Smith had sent there to barrel some refuse tallow. Hagerty had gone into the store to get some new chimneys, and angry words having passed between the two men, Hagerty advanced towards Smith, who stood behind the counter with a double-barreled shot-gun near him. When Hagerty came opposite to Smith the latter raised the weapon and fired, the muzzle almost touching Hagerty's face. The latter received the entire contents of one barrel, which entered the right corner of his mouth, tore most of the flesh from the right cheek, and came out just behind the right ear. The unfortunate man has been in semi-comatose condition since the shooting, and physicians say his recovery is almost impossible. Hagerty's wife, who resides in Louisville, was telegraphed, and arrived here Tuesday evening--at once proceeding to the scene of the tragedy, where she arrived at 2 o'clock next morning. Smith has not been arrested yet, but efforts are being made to secure him. []




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1881?

[] March 18, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-03-18/ed-1/seq-2/

[March 18, 1881] -

Circuit Court will convene next Monday at London, in Laurel county. The case of the Commonwealth vs. B. P. Simpson for the murder of James White will probably be again tried at this term. It will be remembered that this case has been twice tried already, and the result in each trial was a hung jury. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 25, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-07-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 25, 1882] -

THE LAWS DELAY.-- Bart Simpson, who several years ago, killed the County Clerk of Clay and who had four times been on trial for the offence, was acquitted at London, Friday. There were hung juries in three of the trials. The length of time since the killing and the fact that Col. W. O. Bradley was of counsel for the defense the last time, accounts for the result. Judge DeHaven, of the Shelbyville District, presided. []


---

Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 25, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-07-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 25, 1882] -

In the Laurel Circuit Court last week, Judge S. E. DeHaven sitting as special judge, B. P. Simpson, charged with murder, was acquitted. He had been three times tried beforee, each trial resulting in a hung jury. Simpson killed James White, clerk of the Clay County Court, several years ago. In addition to his former strong array of counsel, he was defended at his last trial by Hon. W. O. Bradley. []



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Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 30, 1880. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-04-30/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 30, 1880] -

A reward of $200 has been offered by the Governor for Millard Gilpin charged with murder in Pulaski. []



---

Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 14, 1880. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-05-14/ed-1/seq-2/

[May 14, 1880] -

Millard Gilpin, the murderer of Givens has been caught in Pulaski. The reward offered by the State did the business. []



---

http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-04-14/ed-1/seq-2/  Jim Gilpin, pardoned murderer??
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1883-04-20/ed-1/seq-2/ Scott Gilpin, same person?
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1883-05-08/ed-1/seq-2/ scott gilpin


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"A Gory Head Without the Body." Cincinnati Daily Gazette, Cincinnati, OH.  May 14, 1881. Page 10. Genealogybank.com.

[May 14, 1881] -


A Gory Head Without the Body.

Special Dispatch to the Cincinnati Gazette.

SOMERSET, KY., May 13. -- The dog of Mr. Gastineau, of the eastern portion of this county, brought the head of a man into his yard last evening. On examination, the head was recognized as belonging to a stock trader who disappeared in a very mysterious manner a few days ago. Decomposition had not set in. The body has not been found yet. [] 



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"Another Kentucky Murder Mystery." Cincinnati Commercial Tribune, Cincinnati, OH.. May 28, 1881. Page 1. Genealogybank.com.

[May 28, 1881] -

Another Kentucky Murder Mystery

Special to the Cincinnati Commercial.

SOMERSET, KY., May 27 -- Yesterday while some boys were fishing near Somerset, in a small creek, the body of a man was found. His body was somewhat lacerated, and blood had oozed from his mouth and nose He was carried to a near house and searched, but as yet no clue to the killing has been discovered. The man's name is unknown.

Three affairs of this kind have transpired in the last week. The body of Lewis Gosset was found on Tuesday, and Wm. Durham was killed by Mulony on Sunday. These affairs were, however, about the railroad and among railroad men.



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1881?

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 28, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-10-28/ed-1/seq-2/

[October 28, 1881] -

James Burton, who shot and killed Samuel Edmonson at Livingston some time ago, was acquitted upon his examining trial before Esquires Pike and Calloway, last Friday, on the ground that he acted in self-defense. []

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The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 9, 1881. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-12-09/ed-1/seq-3/

[December 9, 1881] -

On last Sunday morning, at Reedsville, a difficulty occurred between Wm. Roberts an old man, and one King, a young man, who had been working for Roberts, over the paltry sum of six dollars. Roberts made at King with his cane, when the latter drew his little pistol and tried to shoot the former, but the pistol happened to be out of tune and failed to fire. The latter (King), then drew his dirk and commenced to carve the old man, cutting him some several times in the abdomen and ribs, the wounds proving fatal in about half an hour. King is still in the neighborhood but has not been arrested. []






---

The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 16, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-12-16/ed-1/seq-2/


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Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 31, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-01-31/ed-1/seq-3/

[January 31, 1882] -

DEAD.-- Tom Jasper, who was shot some time ago by W. C. Owens, in Somerset, died Sunday.



---

Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 22, 1882. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-12-22/ed-1/seq-2/

[December 22, 1882] -

A damage suit for $10,000 has been brought against W. C. Owens at Somerset, for killing Jasper last year.



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Lincoln or Pulaski? 1881.  not on timeline

Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 4, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-02-04/ed-1/seq-2/

[February 4, 1881] -

William McKinney and Columbus Cass, of Pulaski county, two leading lights in the Methodist Church, settled an old feud last Mond[a]y, while working the county road. The manner was after the usual style of such settlements. Cass took an ax, and knocking McKinney down, beat his head into a jelly and fled. Cass was Superintendent of a Sunday School, but it is not likely that he will be on hand next Sunday. []




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Rockcastle County. 1881? not on timeline

Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 2, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-12-02/ed-1/seq-2/

[December 2, 1881] -

A recent dispatch to the Enquirer from Frankfort states that Governor Blackburn has offered a reward of $100 each for the apprehension of Martin Cobb and Radford Cobb, indicted in the Circuit Court here for manslaughter. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 18, 1882. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-08-18/ed-1/seq-2/

[August 18, 1882] -

The trial of the two Cobbs, now in the Stanford jail, who are indicted for manslaughter, is set down for next Tuesday. []


---

Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 25, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-08-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[August 25, 1882] -

Martin and Radford Cobb, who has been confined in the Stanford jail charged with manslaughter were brought here [Mt. Vernon] for trial Tuesday. For a wonder both sides were ready, a severance of the cases was had, and the trial of Martin Cobb was begun. The testimony showed a plain case of self-defense and the jury after a few moments deliberation returned a verdict of not guilty. Mr. Warren then very properly filed away the case against Radford Cobb. []





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Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 26, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-10-26/ed-1/seq-3/

col 2
June 1882
Samuel Combs, James Mounce


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Whitley County. 1882. not on timeline

Excerpt from "State News." The South Kentuckian, Hopkinsville, KY. February 14, 1882. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069392/1882-02-14/ed-1/seq-1/

[February 14, 1882] -

M. A. Moore shot and killed Hannibal Ross at Somerset, Ky., in self-defense. []


---

THIS IS WHITLEY COUNTY: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-01-31/ed-1/seq-2/

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"A Man-Devil." Cincinnati Post, Cincinnati, OH. July 10, 1883. Page 1. Genealogybank.com.

[July 10, 1883] -

A MAN-DEVIL.

William Eades, Rapist, Murderer, and Thief, is Arrested in Missouri and Brought Back to Somerset.

SPECIAL TO THE PENNY POST.

SOMERSET, KY., July 10. -- William Eades, arrested by the sheriff of Adams co., Missouri, for stealing a horse, was brought from that state and jailed here yesterday, to answer for many crimes committed in this vicinity. He is about 35, and was born in what is known as the "White Oaks." This section of Pulaski co. was always prolific of rogues, thieves, and murderers. When 17 he was the trusted farm hand of a man named Moses Muncey near Mill Springs, Wayne co. One night he crept through the bed-room window of Muncey's 16 year-old daughter, Hannah, satisfied his evil passions, and made his escape. He disappeared for a time, but came upon the surface again as one of the Cooper men--a gang of the most desperate characters that ever infested southern Kentucky. He took part in the well-remembered fight between the Cooperites and ku-klux at Somerset, in which seven ku-klux and five of Cooper's men were killed on the public square. He distinguished himself that day by going to the room of a sick man, in the old National hotel, and murdering him in cold blood, because he was suspected of being a ku-klux. Later he came out on the sidewalk, and, while the warm blood was still dripping from his dirk, put the blade, which had been bent against some of the bones of his victim's body, between his teeth and straightened it, remarking at the time: "The blood of a d--n ku-klux is sweeter than honey." Though he thought that Kentucky justice would never overtake him, he was well aware that the hate of his enemies would soon put a stop to his lawless life, and he fled the country. Gradually the history of his misdeeds passed out of mind, and he ventured back again to his old haunts in White Oak. This time he lived with his decrepid old grandmother, who was a fortune-teller, a reputed witch, and who had an underground bar-room, where she sold moonshine whisky for a lot of illicit distillers. Eades soon engaged in the traffic. He would fill a canoe with several kegs of whisky, and paddle up to Burnside on the Cincinnati Southern railroad, and, as it was a considerable place at this time, sell his liquor and get back to his hiding place before the officers got on his track. One day, while at Burnside, he attempted to kiss the pretty wife of a gentleman who lived there. She told her husband of the insult. He remonstrated with Eades, and was immediately shot dead. This was the last exploit of his in the country. A mob of men followed him through the mountains of Tennessee for three days, but he escaped. His personal description had been sent to most of the sheriffs in the adjacent states, but nothing of his whereabouts was known until the news came of his arrest. []



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[] "Murdered By His Uncle." Wheeling Register, Wheeling, WV. August 20, 1883. Page 1. Genealogybank.com.

[August 20, 1883] -

Murdered By His Uncle.

SOMERSET, KY., August 19. -- Eli Sprague shot his nephew, Wiley Sprague, through the heart, near Pine Knot, last night. No provocation had been given. []


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Excerpt from "Pulaski County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 2, 1883. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1883-11-02/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 2, 1883] -

PULASKI COUNTY.--The dead body of John Williams was found at the foot of a bluff near Barren Fork, having come to his death by falling over the cliff. Williams and a negro by the name of Rufus Sallee had been out together for a day or two on a drunken spree and there are some suspicions of foul play on the part of the negro. []



---

Excerpt from "State Notes." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. December 15, 1883. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[December 15, 1883] -

Rufe Sallee, charged with murdering a man named Williams, whose dead body was found in Pulaski at the foot of a cliff eighty feet high, has been acquitted. []



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Excerpt from "Crime and Criminals." Trenton Evening Times, Trenton, NJ. June 2, 1884. Page 4. Genealogybank.com.

[June 2, 1884] -

Two Kentucky Tragedies.

LONDON, Ky., June 2.--On Saturday night, at Pittsburg, a mining town near here, a difficulty occurred between James and Peter Riley and David Jackson on one side, and John Lloyd, Sam Taylor, and John Pressnell on the other, in which James Riley, being pressed by John Lloyd, who had a knife in his hand, drew his pistol and fired, killing him instantly. Riley and Jackson then turned upon Lloyd's two friends with clubs, beating them terribly. They are, however, not thought to be mortally wounded. Riley and Jackson escaped. The sheriff and a posse are pursuing them. At the same place, George Delph, a bank boss, struck Neal Beatty, a colored boy. Beatty drew a pistol and shot Delph in the breast, inflicting a very serious wound. []


---

Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 3, 1884. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1884-06-03/ed-1/seq-3/

[June 3, 1884] -

Two more murders are added to Laurel county's growing list. In a general row a[t] Pittsburg, Saturday, a man named James Riley shot and instantly killed John Lloyd. Riley and his partner, Jackson, then beat two other men severely with clubs and made good their escape. At the same place later in the day Neal Beatty, a negro boy shot and probably fatally wounded George Delph, a coal bank boss, who struck him over the head. []





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Excerpt from "Kentucky Knowledge." Semi-Weekly South Kentuckian, Hopkinsville, KY. May 27, 1884. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069394/1884-05-27/ed-1/seq-4/

[May 27, 1884] -

John Ketcham, was shot and instantly killed by a man named Bowles, in Rockcastle county. []



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Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 27, 1885. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-01-27/ed-1/seq-2/

[January 27, 1885] -

A man named Smith was lynched for attempt at rape in Pulaski last week.


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Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 6, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 6, 1885] -

Henry Roberts / Nick Benedict

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Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 6, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 6, 1885] -

Dolph Bailey / Howard Dudley

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Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 6, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 6, 1885] -

George T. Ball / [his father]

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Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 6, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 6, 1885] -

Robert Chappell / Joe Jones

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Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 6, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 6, 1885] -

John Waddle / Sam Murphy

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Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 6, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-11-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 6, 1885] -

[?] Carson / [?][?] (murder?)


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 22, 1885. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-12-22/ed-1/seq-4/

[December 22, 1885] -


At Beaver creek mines, near Somerset, William Parsons killed Frank Wilson. Charles Gooden and W. A. Owens fatally stabbed two other men, names not known. Parsons escaped, but the other two were arrested. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Pulaski or Lincoln?

Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 16, 1886. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-04-16/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 16, 1886] -

A Somerset dispatch says: Six men accused of complicity in the murder of Ben Wilson on Indian Creek, on April 1, were brought here by six citizens of that neighborhood, who had armed themselves and captured the men near the scene of the murder. []





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Excerpt from "Somerset Notes." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. May 2, 1886. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[May 2, 1886] -

SOMERSET, May 1. -- The young man, Geo. McCarty, suspected of the murder of his uncle, Presley McCarty, who was found dead in his yard last Thursday, has left the country. They were both drinking characters and lived in the same house by themselves. The elder man, when found, was shot in the back, the charge passing through the body and making a large hole. The shotgun was found on his bed. George McCarty, the young man suspected, is about twenty years old and has served a term in the penitentiary. []



---

Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 4, 1886. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-05-04/ed-1/seq-2/


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[] Excerpt from "News and Comment." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. September 10, 1886. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[September 10, 1886] -

A short time since, George Inman was shot and killed, near Livingston, by a man named St. Clair. Tuesday, while John and Andrew Inman were cleaning their pistols, preparatory to going in search of St. Clair, John was accidentally and fatally shot by his brother. []





---

Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 21, 1886. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-09-21/ed-1/seq-2/

[September 21, 1886] -

John St. Clair, of Jackson county, who is charged with killing a blind man named Innman near Livingston, in this county, about two weeks ago, came to the county one day last week and surrendered himself to Squire Gran Clark. He was brought to town and allowed to execute bond for his appearance next Friday, when his examining trial will take place. We are not acquainted with the facts in this case, but it does not seem that there could be any lawful excuse for killing an inoffensive blind man. []





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[] "Arrest of a Murderer." Cincinnati Commercial Tribune, Cincinnati, OH. October 10, 1886. Page 8. Genealogybank.com.

[October 10, 1886] -


ARREST OF A MURDERER

Charles Jackson, Wanted in Somerset, Ky., Apprehended in This City.

Charles Jackson (colored), who is wanted in Somerset, Ky., for murder, was arrested last evening by Detectives Crawford, Trussand Carey, and looked up in Central Station, charged with being a fugitive from justice.

The prisoner is accused of shooting William Buzzard, who was working as section hand on the Southern road. The killing occurred last spring, and was the outcome of a quarrel over a game of craps. The prisoner refused to talk. This is said to be the third murder committed by the prisoner. He will be returned to Kentucky tomorrow. []



---

[] Excerpt from "City News." Cincinnati Post, Cincinnati, OH. Monday, October 11, 1886. Page 3. Genealogybank.com.

[October 11, 1886] -


C. S. Jackson, wanted at Somerset, Ky., for the murder of Wm. Buzzard in a game of craps a year ago, was arrested in this city Saturday night, and is being held for the Kentucky authorities. []



---

[] Except from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 12, 1886. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-10-12/ed-1/seq-2/

[October 12, 1886] -

Charles Jackson, wanted at Somerset for the murder of William Buzzard, has been captured in Cincinnati. []





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Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 30, 1886. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1886-11-30/ed-1/seq-2/

[November 30, 1886] -


Pinkney White, a negro was arrested in Cincinnati for the murder of George Brown, his room-mate, at Somerset, Ky., in March, 1885. []





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Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 25, 1887. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-02-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 25, 1887] -

Near Pine Hill, Sunday night, Brownlow Townsend was fatally cut by Charles Childers. The circumstances are about as follows: Townsend and Childers had been paying attention to the same young lady a short distance from Pine Hill. Sunday evening they both went to see her but neither remained long. Toward night they returned under the influence of whisky and staid at the young lady's house until about an hour after dark, when they left in the company of another young man. After going a short distance towards the station a difficulty came up between Townsend and Childers, over their sweetheart, in which rocks and sticks were freely used. Knives were drawn and they began slashing at each other, when Townsend received a thrust in the thigh from which he died within fifteen minutes.  After the cutting Childers fled to the fields and laid in the fodder stack all night. He came to town Monday morning, surrendered himself and was sent to jail. His examining trial was set for Wednesday. Childers' age is about nineteen and that of his victim eighteen. Childers says he don't know who struck the first blow, both being drunk. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 15, 1887. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-03-15/ed-1/seq-2/

[March 15, 1887] -

Charles Phelps and Jack Howell are the last two Pulaskians to fight to the death over an old grudge. When they met Phelps placed his knife against Howell's breast and remarked: "I've a notion to cut your heart out." How placed his knife against Phelp's throat and coolly replied, "Cut away." Phelps did cut away, but unfortunately for him his knife blade broke off at the second thrust. Howell cut Phelps' throat almost from ear to ear. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "News and Comment." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. March 29, 1887. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[March 29, 1887] -

At Mt. Vernon, Ky., yesterday, Willie Levisay and Willette Vowels, boys aged respectively fourteen and ten years, quarreled in a grocery store and going outside to fight it out, Vowels stabbed Levisay near the heart, killing him almost instantly. []




---

[] "The Mt. Vernon Boy Murder." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. March 30, 1887. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[March 30, 1887] -


The Mt. Vernon Boy Murder.

MT. VERNON, KY., March 29. -- [Special.] -- The stabbing of young Livesay by Will Vowels last night is all the topic here to-day. The funeral will take place this afternoon at 3 o'clock. There is no hard feelings between the families of the parties. All recognize the fact that it was a very unfortunate affair, and that it is equally hard upon the families of both parties. Vowels was arrested last night shortly after the killing by Marshal Tom Proctor and turned over to the County Judge, who placed him in the custody of the Jailer. The examining trial is set for tomorrow, the 30th. On account of the youth of Vowels it is presumed that he will not be vigorously prosecuted. Vowels is eleven years old and Livesay was fourteen. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 24, 1887. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-05-24/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 24, 1887] -

Two of the seven murder cases to be tried in London this court have been disposed of, John Hurley getting five years and Charles Luker a like sentence. []



---

[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 31, 1887. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-05-31/ed-1/seq-1/

[May 31, 1887] -


Charles Luker was tried the following week for murder, the victim being Isaac Nelson, and given seven years for "recklessly, wantonly and carelessly firing his pistol at a charivari." []




---

[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 7, 1887. Page 6. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-06-07/ed-1/seq-6/

[June 7, 1887] -


Bills of exceptions in both the Luker (seven years) and Dizney (life sentence) cases have been filed and will go to the Court of Appeals. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 24, 1887. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-05-24/ed-1/seq-3/

[May 24, 1887] -

Two of the seven murder cases to be tried in London this court have been disposed of, John Hurley getting five years and Charles Luker a like sentence. []



---

[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 31, 1887. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-05-31/ed-1/seq-1/

[May 31, 1887] -


The first week, John Hurley, for the murder of Isaac Hyde, was tried and found guilty of manslaughter and assessed five years in the pen. []




------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Excerpt from "News Condensed." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 6, 1888. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-04-06/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 6, 1888] -


Mrs. Mary and Eliza Jasper fired on a negro trying to break into their house, on Fishing Creek, in Pulaski, and brought down Henry Dick, a notorious negro of that section. []




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Excerpt from "Danville, Boyle County." Semi-weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 13, 1888. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-04-13/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 13, 1888] -

The portion of human remains found on McClenden's ridge, in Pulaski county, turns out to be what is left of two peddlers, whom the Hill brothers and their housekeeper murdered and cut up for hog food. The woman has made a confession and says that the men got $200.



---

Semi-weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 24, 1888. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-04-24/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 24, 1888] -

The story about pieces of the dead bodies of two men being found in Pulaski and the subsequent confession of Mrs. Smith, who said she helped John and Henry Hill kill the two Burton boys for their money, turns out to be false all around, by the appearance of the two boys at the examining trial and unmistakable proof that the pieces of flesh came from a dead sheep. []



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Excerpt from "Local Lore." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 26, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-06-26/ed-1/seq-3/

[June 26, 1888] -

KILLING.--A man named Shumate, from Bardstown, shot and killed another named McCarty, at Sinks, in Rockcastle county, Friday. We depended on our Mt. Vernon man to give particulars, but his letter failed to come. []




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"Murdered In the Road." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. September 16, 1888. Page 7. Newspapers.com.

[September 16, 1888] -

Murdered In the Road.

Mt. Vernon, Ky., Sept. 15. -- (Special.) -- This afternoon, between Brodhead and his home, Allen Haggard was found in the road murdered. Indications point to the murdered man's son-in-law, J. E. Powell, as the assassin, as they had been at outs for some time, over the fact of Powell's wife having made application for divorce, charging her husband with inhuman treatment. The parties had been carrying guns for each other for some time. No arrests. []



---

Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 18, 1888. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-09-18/ed-1/seq-1/

[September 18, 1888] -



Saturday afternoon, between Brodhead and his home, Allen Hagard was found in the road murdered. Indications point to the murdered man's son-in-law, J. E. Powell, as the assassin, as they had been at outs for sometime over the fact of Powell's wife having made application for divorce, charging her husband with inhuman treatment. The parties had been carrying guns for each other for sometime. No arrest. []


---

Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 7, 1888. Page 1. LOC.

[December 7, 1888] -

The Widow Haggard is making an effort to have the governor offer a reward for the arrest of Powell, the murderer of her husband. []



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Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 7, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-12-07/ed-1/seq-3/

Excerpt from Column 2. Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 11, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-12-11/ed-1/seq-3/


Tom Harper, West Hansford, Lincoln


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Excerpt from "News in Brief." The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, KY. February 19, 1889. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87060190/1889-02-19/ed-1/seq-4/

[February 19, 1889] -


Henry Worley, charged, with ten other persons, with the murder of Lee Troxtile, at Somerset, Ky., has been arrested. []



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Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 28, 1889. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-05-28/ed-1/seq-4/

[May 28, 1889] -

Tom Hansford, three other men and a cyprian named Lizzie Tucker, were tried for the murder of John Hardick, who was found dead by the railroad near East Bernstadt 2 months ago. The jury failed to agree until 9 o'clock Sunday morning, when a verdict of not guilty was rendered. Hansford was held for false swearing in the case, and he is also under bond for robbing the depot last winter. The young man will probably get there yet. []




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Excerpt from "News Condensed." http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-07-26/ed-1/seq-2/

Wm. Baugh and Green Flynn, at Faubush, Pulaski, were wrestling



---

Excerpt from Column 1. The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. July 26, 1889. Page 2. Newspapers.com








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Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-07-26/ed-1/seq-3/

Evan S. Warren, Hon R. C. Warren, Beatty Wickliffe, Danville



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Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 30, 1889. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-07-30/ed-1/seq-1/

[July 30, 1889] -

It is now believed that the man Jones, who was run over by the cars at Barbourville last Sunday night, was murdered and placed on the track, as a club with considerable blood on it was found near by.




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Excerpt from "News Condensed." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 27, 1889. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-08-27/ed-1/seq-2/

[August 27, 1889] -

Henry Goodman plunged a knife to the hilt into the breast of D. J. Sharp in a magistrate's court in Pulaski, when he made at a sister of Goodman who had called him a liar. Sharp expired immediately. []




---

6th col says this is not somerset ???
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052141/1889-09-06/ed-1/seq-1/



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"Settling Old Scores." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. August 6, 1890. Page 5. Newspapers.com.



---

Excerpt from Column 4. Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 8, 1890. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1890-08-08/ed-1/seq-1/



---

[] Excerpt from "News Condensed." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 26, 1890. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1890-08-26/ed-1/seq-2/

[August 26, 1890] -

P. F. Smith, police judge, and John Coomer, marshal of Burnside, were tried before Judge Denton, charged with killing John Chestnut at Burnside election day, and acquitted on the grounds of self defense. The Burnside reporter of the Republican says that the decision gives general satisfaction. []




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Excerpt from "Sparks From The Wire." The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, KY. September 1, 1890. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87060190/1890-09-01/ed-1/seq-4/

[September 1, 1890] -


Andy Bowman, wanted at Somerset, Ky., for murder, was arrested at Birmingham, Ala., Saturday. It is said he has killed three men. He was heavily armed when captured. []




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1890?

"Captured After 12 Years." The Paducah Sun, Paducah, KY. July 30, 1903. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052116/1903-07-30/ed-1/seq-1/

[July 30, 1903] -

CAPTURED AFTER 12 YEARS

Somerset, Ky., July 30 -- Richard Taylor, charged with the murder of Clay Haynes, and who has been a fugitive for 12 years, was arrested at Stearns and lodged in jail here. Taylor was 14 years of age, and had been mistreated by Haynes. Taylor afterwards met Haynes and, it is alleged, told him that he was going to kill him, and that he had better say his prayers at the same time drawing a pistol. After Haynes had finished praying he shot him to death. He then fled the county and has been in Mexico ever since. []




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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 13, 1891. Page 3. LOC.

[January 13, 1891] -

KILLED HER SON. -- Jane Mullins, colored, shot her son Henry through the lungs Sunday night, killing him instantly. The parties lived in Crab Orchard and there are conflicting reports of the murder. One is that it was a deliberate and premeditated deed, the other that it was accidental and happened during a scuffle for the weapon. The woman has since made herself scarce. []





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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 1, 1891. Page 5. LOC. 

[May 1, 1891] -

FATALLY SHOT. -- In a difficulty at Kingsville this week John Wesley Gooch was shot in the right side by a fellow named Lasley from Pulaski, the ball going clear through him. The origin of the difficulty is rather obscure. Mr. Gooch, it will be remembered, killed Constable Killion at Highland 10 years ago, but was acquitted on the ground that he acted under a misapprehension of the part Mr. Killion took in a fight he was having with another man. []





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Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 29, 1891. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1891-05-29/ed-1/seq-1/

[May 29, 1891] -

At this writing Ben Martin's case for killing Tom Hodge is before the court and will be tried, both sides being ready. []



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Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 7, 1891. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1891-08-07/ed-1/seq-3/

[August 7, 1891] -

The only trouble in the county on election day was at Crooked Creek precinct where John D. Mullins met his death at the hands of Bill Damerel. It appears that Damerel was drunk and had been noisy around the polls and was displaying his money. Young Mullins, the sheriff of the election, spoke to Damerel and requested him to settle an old debt due Mullins, whereupon Damerel flew into a passion and replied that he would whip out the amount with Mullins. Later when Damerel was flourishing a pistol and making a noise around the polls, Mullins asked him to be quiet. Damerel replied that he would "burn it off in his face." Damerel was persuaded to leave, but before starting away it is said he remarked that he would kill some one before he left the place. He with Jones Durham went to where their horses were hitched and after mounting both began firing their pistols. After the fifth shot young Mullins, who was sitting inside the house where the voting was going on, leaning his head over on one hand was seen to fail from his chair a corpse. Damerel and Durham put spurs to their horses and fled. Several parties pursued them, but others on foot cut across a mountain and headed them off and captured them, bringing them on here to jail that night. Mullins was shot in the center of the nose, the ball passing to the back of the neck and ranged downward, producing instant death. Witnesses say that Durham pointed his pistol downward when he was shooting, and that Damerel took deliberate aim at his victim. Damerel says that he don't know that he shot Mullins, but that if he did it was accidental. The examination trial is set for Friday, when it is thought Durham will be released. Considerable feeling exists int he whole eastern portion of the county over the tragic death of young Mullins, as he was a very popular man and highly esteemed by everyone and a useful citizen. Damerel is not a native of the county but is from East Tennessee, and has been here but a few years. []


---

Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.   September 13, 1892. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-09-13/ed-1/seq-1/

[September 13, 1892] -

The testimony and speeches were finished Saturday at noon in the Dameron case and was then given to the jury, which returned a verdict after five hours consultation, finding the defendant guilty of voluntary manslaughter and fixing his punishment at two years in the "pen."



---

Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  September 23, 1892. Page 5. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-09-23/ed-1/seq-5/

[September 23, 1892] -

Bill Damerel, who got two years at last term of court, was taken to Frankfort last Thursday. Fain, who was given 17 years for killing Jesse Hilton, has taken an appeal. []



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Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 22, 1891. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1891-09-22/ed-1/seq-3/

[September 22, 1891] -

If the reports, which come from Somerset about the killing of Engineer John White of the C. S., by John Catron, a saloon keeper, be true, Judge Lynch might with much propriety resume his operations there. With no apparent provocation whatever, he struck his victim with a stick, knocking him down, and drawing a pistol, shot him as he lay on the floor. The only excuse given for the crime is that Catron was drunk. []



---

[] "Brutally Murdered." The Crittenden Press, Marion, KY. September 24, 1891. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069457/1891-09-24/ed-1/seq-1/
2nd col

[September 24, 1891] -

BRUTALLY MURDERED.

A Cincinnati Southern Engineer Shot to Death by a Saloon Keeper.

LEXINGTON, Ky., Sept. 21.-- Another brutal murder was committed in Somerset Friday morning, about 1 o'clock. At that hour John White, a well known and highly respected engineer on the second division of the Cincinnati Southern railroad, entered a grocery store in Somerset to pay a bill of $5.15 that he owed the proprietor. In the store was John Catron, a saloon keeper, of Somerset, who was drunk. He made some insulting remark to White, who resented the same. He then picked up a stick, and struck White a terrible blow, felling him to the floor. He then drew his pistol, and while the unfortunate man was on the floor, shot him three times, producing fatal wounds, from which he died three hours afterwards. White leaves a wife and children, who live in Ohio. []


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Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 25, 1891. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1891-09-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[September 25, 1891] -

A dispatch to the Courier-Journal from Crab Orchard says: Two neighboring youths, Frank Bastin and Joe Henry, aged respectively 12 and 19, while on their way to church at Highland became involved in a quarrel as to which should have the empty pint bottle which they had just drained of its liquor, and Bastin drew his pocket-knife and plunged it up to the handle in his companion's side. Henry, it is thought, will die.





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"Acted in Self-Defense." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. December 11, 1891. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[December 11, 1891] -


Acted in Self-Defense.

Somerset, Ky., Dec. 10. -- (Special.) -- Thos. Candler, of this place, was given a preliminary hearing to-day in Judge Denton's court for the killing, last month, of J. P. Brewer, in a saloon fight. After examining thirty witnesses, the court released Candler, as he was justified in his act.



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Lincoln county?

Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 16, 1892. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-02-16/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 16, 1892] -

The killing of Joe Goode by Green Gentry in Anderson Carr's bar-room, making the second person to be killed there, has raised the question as to whether he is keeping a proper house under his license. An effort was made to have the council recind his license at its last meeting, but it was decided that the proper method of procedure against him was before the county judge on complaint of citizens. Accordingly a warrant was issued returnable before Judge Varnon next Thursday, when proof will be heard on the question of revoking Carr's license. The fact that the killing occurred in his saloon is not of itself proof that he is keeping a disorderly house and that alone is not sufficient to convict him, since it might have occurred anywhere, but it is said that additional proof will be brought forward to sustain the charge. In this connection it would be well also to investigate the other saloons in town. We are told that liquors can be obtained from them  at any time Sunday through private entrances and that there is complaint against them for selling to inebriates, which is expressly forbidden under the law. Let there be a searching investigation and let no one be spared because of race or other reasons. If the saloon men want to have the license law continued, it will stand them in hand to live squarely up to the bonds that they have given. They can do more to make that law odious than all other agencies combined. The law and order men who are not prohibitionists, will be forced to change their opinions as to license, if the safeguards are continually and openly violated.



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murder case?

Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 18, 1892. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-03-18/ed-1/seq-2/

[March 18, 1892] -

George C. Thompson, who has been confined in jail here since last circuit court awaiting the action of the court of appeals in his case, in which he was sentenced to two years in the penitentiary, has had his case reversed again and will in a few days be a free man again, until next circuit court anyway. There will be no trouble for him to give any amount of bond required. []






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[] "A $3 Murder." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. March 26, 1892. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

[March 26, 1892] -


A $3 Murder.

Robert Eldridge, a Butcher, Kills Jesse Davies At Somerset.

A Small Meat Bill Owed By the Victim Causes the Tragedy.

Somerset, Ky., March 25. -- (Special.) -- Jesse Davies was shot and killed by Robert Eldridge, a butcher in the store of B. V. Grinstead, at 5:30 o'clock this afternoon. Eldridge walked in and bought a plug of tobacco. He met Davies near the front and they began to quarrel. Suddenly Eldridge drew a pistol and fired four times at Davies, who fell to the floor, where he died almost immediately.

Three of the four shots struck him, one in the wrist, one in the temple, and the last, which was fired after he fell, penetrated to the heart. Doctors Perkins and Owens were called, but when they arrived Davies was dead. Davies and Eldridge have had trouble over a meat bill of $3, and it was that which caused the killing. Davies had no regular employment, but worked at odd jobs. He was shiftless, but not of a quarrelsome disposition.

The victim was thirty years of age and the son of D. A. Davies, a prominent pension attorney of this place. He leaves a wife and four small children in poor circumstances. Eldridge is a son-in-law of his business partner, John Babbitt, and has only resided at this place about six months, having come from the Flat Lick country, nine miles east of this place. Eldridge has been looked upon as a hot tempered, dangerous man, but this is the first trouble he has ever been connected with. He is about thirty years of age, is married and has two small children. []



---

[] "Jesse Davis Killed." Cincinnati Post, Cincinnati, OH. March 26, 1892. Page 8. Genealogybank.com.

[March 26, 1892] -

Jesse Davis Killed.

SOMERSET, Ky., March 26, -- [Special.] -- Last night Robert Eldridge shot and killed Jesse Davis, son of a well-known pension attorney. Davis was shot in the arm, temple and heart. The trouble occurred in Eldridge's butcher shop over a bill of $8 which Davis owed for meat. After the shooting Eldridge surrendered. []


---

[] "Somerset's Last Tragedy." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. March 27, 1892. Page 4. Newspapers.com.

[March 27, 1892] -


SOMERSET'S LAST TRAGEDY.

A Coroner's Jury Views the Body of Jesse Davies--The Jail Guarded.

Somerset, Ky., March 26. -- (Special.) -- The Coroner's jury, after viewing the remains Jesse Davies, the victim of yesterday's tragedy, returned a verdict on the statement of Eldridge without hearing the testimony that Davies came to his death by a pistol shot fired by Eldridge. The examination trial was set for 3 o'clock this afternoon on before Mayor James L. Colyer, but was postponed on account of the absence of County Judge George Shadoan until Monday morning at 10 o'clock. Large crowds came to town from Eldridge's old neighborhood, and Chief of Police J. C. Anderson and Sheriff L. Denton put extra officers on duty to guard the jail.

Eldridge came to Somerset from the Gilliland vicinity, and while he has not been immediately connected with their misdeeds still he has sympathy from that quarter. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Newsy Notes." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 1, 1892. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-04-01/ed-1/seq-4/

[April 1, 1892] -

The examining trial of Robert Eldridge, for the killing of Jesse Davies, was held in Somerset, and Eldridge was held over for the grand jury in $1,000 bond. []


---

[] "Indicted for Manslaughter." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. April 27, 1892. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[April 27, 1892] -


Indicted For Manslaughter.

Somerset, Ky., April 26. -- (Special.) -- The grand jury to-day found a true bill against Robert Eldridge for manslaughter. Eldridge shot and killed Jesse Davis at this place May 8, over a dispute about a meat bill. Eldridge's trial is set for Wednesday. []





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"A Murderer Brought Back." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. June 1, 1892. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[June 1, 1892] -


A Murderer Brought Back.

Somerset, Ky., May 31. -- (Special.) -- T. R. Griffin, railroad detective for the Cincinnati Southern railroad at this place, arrived here to-day with Yellow Hammer, alias Charles Aklen, one of the most desperate negro characters in this part of Kentucky. Aklen was captured at Kingston, Tenn. He is brought back for the murder of Hiram Taylor, last February, at tunnel, No. 7, a few miles below this place. []


---

Excerpt from "Newsy Notes." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 3, 1892. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-06-03/ed-1/seq-4/

[June 3, 1892] -

Charles Atkin, who is wanted at Somerset for the murder of Hiram Taylor, has been arrested in Tennessee and taken back to Somerset. []


---

Excerpt from Column 2. Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  April 4, 1893. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-04-04/ed-1/seq-1/

[April 4, 1893] -

Yellow Hammer Ackles 21 years for the murder of John Taylor by the Somerset court. []




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Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 3, 1892. Page 5. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-06-03/ed-1/seq-5/

[June 3, 1892] -

WAIVED. -- West King, who killed Frank Fish at Crab Orchard, waived an examination when his case was called Wednesday and he was held in $1,500 bail to circuit court. Of course he will not be able to give it. The mitigating circumstances are that Fish drew a pistol on him in the afternoon and when King told him he was not armed, said: "Go and arm yourself, I intend to kill you." King went home and got his pistol and returning told Fish he was ready for him, at the same time opening fire. Fish's pistol wouldn't work and King got in his work on the fifth fire.





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[] "Caused by an Ancient Grudge." Cleveland Leader, Cleveland, OH. October 23, 1892. Page 7. Genealogybank.com.

[October 23, 1892] -

Caused by an Ancient Grudge.

CINCINNATI, October 22. -- An Enquirer special from Somerset, Ky., says that at 10 o'clock this forenoon at Greenwood, Pulaski county, Ky., Jim Patterson and Joe Haines quarreled and resorted at once to firearms. Haines fired the first two shots from his revolver. Both missed Patterson, but one bullet killed a Negro, name unknown, and the other wounded Mr. Weatherford, station agent of the Cincinnati Southern Railway, in the shoulder, but not fatally. Patterson immediately, with one shot from a Winchester rifle, killed Haines and then surrendered to the officers. The result of this is two men killed and one badly wounded. The cause is an ancient grudge. []


---

[] "A Peacemaker Killed." Plaindealer, Detroit, MI. October 28, 1892. Page 1. Genealogybank.com.

[October 28, 1892] -

A Peacemaker Killed.

Somerset, Ky., Oct. 22. -- A shooting affray occurred at Greenwood, twelve miles South of the Cumberland river, and which is a considerable mining town, this morning about 10:00 o'clock. Chas. Haynes and Lucien Patterson have had an old grudge at one another for a long time, and this morning they concluded to shoot it out. Haynes drew his pistol and attempted to shoot Patterson, but an Afro-American named John Jewett tried to part them, when he was shot through and through and killed instantly. The agent, Mr. Weatherford, was also accidentally shot in the breast, but his wound is not necessarily fatal and he will recover. Patterson then shot with a Winchester rifle and instantly killed Haynes. It is said that Patterson acted in self-defense. []



---

Excerpt from "Newsy Notes." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 24, 1894. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1894-04-24/ed-1/seq-2/

[April 24, 1894] -

Lucien Patterson was given two years at Somerset for the murder of Charles Hines at Greenwood. []




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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 13, 1892. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-09-13/ed-1/seq-1/

[September 13, 1892] -

Mr. Bruce Wilmot died at Brodhead Friday morning from the effects of the gun shot wound received at the hands of Joe Howard. He was buried Saturday by the Masons. He was popular throughout the county and his death is deeply deplored by every one. It was one of the longest funeral processions ever seen hereabouts. []





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accidental?

Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 4, 1892. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-11-04/ed-1/seq-2/

[November 4, 1892] -

Monday on Brush creek, this county, Bill Hubbard, while sitting at dinner, was shot and instantly killed. Whether the killing was accidental or not is not known. It is said Dr. Hunly and Tom Bowles were at the house of Hubbard and were drinking and firing off their pistols while sitting out on the porch and a ball from one of their weapons passed through the board partition of the house, striking him in the neck. All are Jackson county men. No arrests.




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Excerpt from "Newsy Notes." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 20, 1892. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-12-20/ed-1/seq-4/

[December 20, 1892] -

Mrs. Eveline Burdine is in jail at Somerset charged with the murder of Joseph Arthur. She claims that Arthur was attempting to gain admittance to her room and that she killed him in self defense. []



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Excerpt from "Newsy Notes." Semi-weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 27, 1893. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-01-27/ed-1/seq-2/

[January 27, 1893] -


Near Somerset, at the Barren Fork coal mines, John and Jim Ledford shot and killed a negro named Luck Sutton. The shooting was the result of a drunken row. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Personal." Daily Public Ledger, Maysville, KY. February 27, 1893. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069117/1893-02-27/ed-1/seq-1/

[February 27, 1893] -

Governor Brown will pay $100 for the arrest of James and John Ledford, who are charged with murder in Pulaski county. []



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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 26, 1893. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-05-26/ed-1/seq-4/

[May 26, 1893] -

The case against Robt. Cook, charged with murder was dismissed on peremptory instructions of the judge. It will be remembered that Miss Burnett, of the Scaffold Cane neighborhood, committed suicide about a year since. Young Cook was charged with having furnished her with the poison with which she took her life and a grand jury returned an indictment last September.




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[] Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 23, 1893. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-05-23/ed-1/seq-2/

[May 23, 1893] -

Miss Mary Hardwick, of Science Hill, was shot by unknown parties and placed on a freight train. []




---

[] Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 30, 1893. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-05-30/ed-1/seq-2/

[May 30, 1893] -

Mike Lynch has been named by the coroner's jury at Somerset as the murderer of Mary Hardwick, who was mysteriously shot a week ago. Lynch is a railroad section boss and the woman was of bad reputation. []




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[] "To Answer For Murder." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. June 26, 1893. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[June 26, 1893] -


TO ANSWER FOR MURDER.

Three Men Held For Killing Andrew Dolson Near Somerset.

Somerset, Ky., June 25. -- (Special.) -- Yesterday before County Judge James Denlin, Seth Mofield, Sanford Orwin and Beinger Dye were held over to the grand jury without bail for the murder of Andrew Dolson, which occurred the 11th inst. John Dye, Fount Mofield Jr., Thomas Mofield, and Elisha Mofield were held over in the sum of $500 bail as accessories to the killing. The accused are charged with calling Andrew Dolson to his door and shooting him down. Dolson resided about eleven miles west of this place, and was a cousin of the accused. The trial yesterday created some excitement, as the accused all bear good reputations. []

---

[] "Lack of Evidence." Cincinnati Post, Cincinnati, OH. November 11, 1893. Page 6. Genealogybank.com.

[November 11, 1893] -

LACK OF EVIDENCE.

Grand Jury Ordered to Ignore a Murder Case.

SOMERSET, KY., Nov 11. -- [Special.] -- In the Circuit Court here this morning Judge Morrow ordered the jury to find Seth Mofield and others not guilty of the murder of Andy Dodson. The evidence was purely circumstantial.




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Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 20, 1893. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-10-20/ed-1/seq-2/

[October 20, 1893] -

W. S. Baxter for killing his uncle, John Baxter, was given 21 years. []


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[] "Jeff Arnold's Wound Proves Fatal." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. October 26, 1893. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[October 26, 1893] -


Jeff Arnold's Wound Proves Fatal.

Somerset, Ky., Oct. 25. -- (Special.) -- Jeff Arnold, who was shot several days ago by Jim Ramey and Jess Bullock, died at his home, near Line Creek, last night. Ramey gave himself up to the Sheriff at this place today and is at present under guard. Bullock is still at large. The killing was the outcome of a quarrel. []



---

[] Daily Public Ledger, Maysville, KY. October 27, 1893. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069117/1893-10-27/ed-1/seq-1/

[October 27, 1893] -

Jeff Arnold died from wounds inflicted by James Ramey and Jesse Bullock at his home near Somerset. []




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[] "A Son's Revenge." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. November 28, 1893. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[November 28, 1893] -


A Son's Revenge.

Somerset, Ky., Nov. 27. -- (Special.) -- Dolly Maize [Dooly Mize?] and Robert Sears, of Dallas, this county, became involved in a quarrel yesterday, when Maize shot Sears through the brain, inflicting a serious wound, John Sears, a son of Robert Sears, the wounded man, hunted up Maize and shot him, inflicting a flesh wound. []




---

Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 28, 1893. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-11-28/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 28, 1893] -

Marshall Newland got a dispatch yesterday from Judge G. W. McClure, county attorney of Rockcastle, to arrest Dooley Mize, 22 years old, 5 feet 8 inches, 135 pounds, light hair and red complexion, on a charge of murder committed in Pulaski. The marshal searched all the trains yesterday and kept his eye skinned for the man, but failed to catch him. []




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[] "Shooting at Somerset." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. October 9, 1893. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

[October 9, 1893] -


SHOOTING AT SOMERSET.

Freight Conductor Trainham Mortally Wounded in His Caboose.

Somerset, Ky., Oct. 8. -- (Special.) -- Late last night, as freight train No. 30 was about to start south and while Conductor S. D. Trainham, aged thirty, was checking up his train, James Crews, of this place, an ex-brakeman, entered the caboose and asked Trainham to take a drink, which offer Trainham refused, after which Crews asked Trainham to go with him. This Trainham also refused to do, and Crews drew his pistol and shot Trainham in the abdomen. Trainham was taken to his home, and is hourly expected to die. Crews was at once arrested and lodged in jail.

Trainham came here three years ago from Virginia, about one year ago married a Miss Smith, of this place. They have one child. Crews is a bad man when in liquor, and has been connected with several bad affrays. Crews denies that he purposely shot Trainham, and says it was an accident. His story is not believed. Trainham states that he and Crews have never had any trouble. Trainham is sinking rapidly, and can not survive the night. []




---

"Jim Crews a Murderer." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. October 10, 1893. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[October 10, 1893] -


Jim Crews a Murderer.

Somerset, Ky., Oct. 9. -- (Special.) -- E. D. Trawham, the freight conductor shot at this place Saturday night by Jim Crews, died late last night from the effect of his wounds. Trawham was very popular here, and his death is regretted. Crews, his slayer, is still in jail at this place. Much indignation is expressed against Crews, who will no doubt be given the limit of the law. []



---

[] "Jim Crews' Victim Buried." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. October 11, 1893. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[October 11, 1893] -

Jim Crews' Victim Buried.

Somerset, Ky., Oct. 10. -- (Special.) -- The funeral services of E. D. Trainham were held at the Baptist church at this at this place to-day at 3 p.m. His slayer, Jim Crews, is still in jail. The feeling here against Crews is intense. Trainham was buried with Masonic honors, having been a member of that order at this place. []



---

[] "Jim Crews Bound Over." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. October 13, 1893. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[October 13, 1893] -


Jim Crews Bound Over.

Somerset, Ky., Oct. 12. -- (Special.) -- Jim Crews, who killed Conductor E. B. Trainham, at this place last Saturday night, was yesterday bound over to appear before the grand jury by Judge James Denton, of this place. []





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[] "Trial of Jim Crews." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. November 14, 1893. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[November 14, 1893] -


Trial of Jim Crews.

Somerset, Ky., Nov. 13. -- (Special.) -- The trial of Jim Crews for the murder of Ed Trainham is in progress here, and is attracting much attention. Crews shot Trainham in his caboose on the Cincinnati Southern railroad at this place about six weeks ago. Crews' defense is insanity. []




---

[] "Jim Crews Escapes the Gallows." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. November 15, 1893. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[November 15, 1893] -


Jim Crews Escaped the Gallows.

Somerset, Ky., Nov. 14. -- (Special.) -- Jim Crews, who murdered Ed Trainham, was to-day found guilty and sentenced to twenty-one years in the penitentiary. Considering the crime, the sentence is thought to be a light one. []



---

[] "Newsy Notes." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 17, 1893. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-11-17/ed-1/seq-2/

[November 17, 1893] -

At Somerset, Jim Crews, for the murder of Ed Trainham, was given 21 years instead of having his neck broken as he deserved. []




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[] Excerpt from "Personal Points." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 29, 1893. Page 5. LOC.

[September 29, 1893] -

Judge T. Z. Morrow was on yesterday's train returning to Somerset from his court at Mt. Vernon. He barely had time to sentence the negroes who killed the peddler, for life, and catch the train, after the verdict was rendered. []



---

Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 28, 1893. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1893-11-28/ed-1/seq-3/

[November 28, 1893] -

Al Berry, the negro the Rockcastle jury let off with a life sentence for robbing and murdering a peddler, who escaped from the penitentiary, was captured in a straw rick and returned to prison. He escaped by scaling the wall and on being asked how he made his way over it, requested that the officers take him out and let him give an exhibition. He was taken to the perpendicular wall and ascended it to the top with the rapidity of a squirrel. The officers of the penitentiary are talking of making Berry a present of a medal. []






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Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 27, 1894. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1894-02-27/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 27, 1894] -

The Richmond Register explains why James Todd, who was killed by Aurelius Dunn, went by the name of Brown. With a party from Berea, where he was born, he went to Jackson county and became involved in a difficulty. He was arrested and held to the circuit court, but jumped his bail and skipped to Pine Hill, thence to Somerset and finally located near McKinney, in Lincoln county, where he went by the name of James Brown, and was married under that name to a woman who bore him seven children and with whom he was living at the time of his death. His full name was James Brown Todd.





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[] "Terrible Charge Against a Farmer." The Public Ledger, Maysville, KY. April 16, 1894. Page 3. LOC.

[April 16, 1894] -


Terrible Charge Against a Farmer.


DANVILLE, Ky., April 16. -- John Greenarch, a well-known farmer of Pulaski county, has been arrested and jailed at Jamestown to await trial on the charge of having poisoned his wife in order to be free to marry another woman, with whom he was infatuated. Mrs. Greenarch died several weeks ago without having had medical attention. Suspicion was aroused, the body disinterred, and a post-mortem examination held, which showed unmistakably that the woman had been poisoned. Greenarch ran off with the other woman a few days after his wife's death.


---

[] Excerpt from "Newsy Notes." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 17, 1894. Page 2. LOC.

[April 17, 1894] -

The Columbia Spector says that John Greenarch, of Pulaski, is in jail at Jamestown for poisoning his wife to marry another woman, whom he was eloping with when apprehended.




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[] Excerpt from "Mt.Vernon, Rockcastle County. The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 1, 1894. Page 1. LOC.

[June 1, 1894] -

The trial of Bill Newcum for the murder of Mrs. Burk is in progress to day, Thursday.



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Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 1, 1895. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1895-03-01/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 1, 1895] -

william hale, george pennington, lincoln


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"Boy Killed Over a Game of Marbles." Hazel Green Herald, Hazel Green, KY. June 6, 1895. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86063242/1895-06-06/ed-1/seq-2/

[June 6, 1895] -


Boy Killed Over a Game of Marbles.

At Woodstock, a small place 18 miles from Somerset, Ky., J. J. Thompson and Arthur Todd became involved in a quarrel, when Todd stabbed Thompson in the throat, causing a mortal wound. Thompson lived but a short time after the cutting. Thompson was eighteen years of age and the son of Magistrate John Thompson. Todd is also eighteen years of age and is well connected. The trouble is supposed to have originated over a game of marbles which the boys were playing. Arthur Todd is in the Pulaski county jail and will be given an examining trial before Judge W. M. Catron Saturday. []


---

Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 16, 1895. Page 5. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1895-07-16/ed-1/seq-5/

[July 16, 1895] -

Arthur Todd, who stabbed young Marion Thompson to death at a singing school near Woodstock a couple of weeks ago, was tried at Somerset last week and given 10 years in the penitentiary. Todd is only 16 years old while Thompson was a year his junior. []



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Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 18, 1895. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1895-06-18/ed-1/seq-3/

[June 18, 1895] -

SAVED HIS NECK.  -- Lewis Rector, an ex-convict and notorious horse thief, was lodged in jail at London and Friday night a mob of about 60 men took him out to hang him. They placed a rope around his neck and started to carry out their designs, when the fellow promised to give a big snap away if he were permitted to live. His plea was granted and he made some startling revelations, implicating men who had never before been suspicioned. 





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Excerpt from "Kentucky." Daily Public Ledger, Maysville, KY. July 1, 1895. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069117/1895-07-01/ed-1/seq-2/

[July 1, 1895] -


Shot From Ambush.

SOMERSET, Ky., July 1. -- W. J. Adkins, residing about 15 miles northeast of here, was shot from ambush near his home, the wound proving fatal. Adkins has been a terror to the eastern part of the county for several years. He leaves a family and several children.


---

Excerpt "Of a Local Nature." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 16, 1895. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1895-07-16/ed-1/seq-1/

[July 16, 1895] -

Will Jesse Adkins, who was shot from ambush in Pulaski county a short time ago, will probably die of his wounds without revealing the identity of his assassin. []




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Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 16, 1895. Page 5. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1895-07-16/ed-1/seq-5/

[July 16, 1895] -

When Louis Coffey, a young man of 19, attempted to reach the house of Isaac Burnett, near Monticello, to get his daughter to elope with him, he was discovered by Mr. Burnett, who charged him with doing so. Coffey called him a liar and as Burnett approached him drew a pistol. Burnett grabbed for the weapon, which was discharged both balls taking effect in Burnett's body from the effects of which he died after several days suffering. Coffey gave himself up and is now in jail. Burnett was 45 years of age and a highly respected citizens. Coffey's reputation is not so good. He was very much dejected, until he received a message from the girl, who is but 13 years of age, that she would go with him as soon as he got out of jail. []


---

Excerpt from "Of a Local Nature." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 19, 1895. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1895-07-19/ed-1/seq-3/

[July 19, 1895] -

Louis Coffey has been bound over in the sum of $600 to the Circuit Court to be tried for the killing of Isaac Burnett at Monticello, July 8. []



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[] Excerpt from "Newsy Notes." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 19, 1895. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1895-07-19/ed-1/seq-2/

[July 19, 1895] -

Mrs. Nancy Slavens, was murdered and robbed at her home in Wayne county. Some of her grand-children are suspected of the crime. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Of A Local Nature." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 9, 1895. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1895-08-09/ed-1/seq-1/

[August 9, 1895] -

Andrew Slavens and his three sons have been arrested in Scott county, Tenn., and returned to Monticello, Ky., charged with murdering and robbing Mrs. Nancy Slavens. []




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[] "Another Killing in Pulaski." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. September 17, 1895. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[September 17, 1895] -

Another Killing In Pulaski.

Somerset, Ky., Sept, 16. -- (Special.) -- A man named Estes shot and killed a young man named Singleton at Eubanks, fifteen miles north of here, Saturday night. Singleton was drinking and raising a row. Estes is now in jail here. []



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osborn, osbourn, osbourne, osborne, southerland, sutherland, sotherland

[] Excerpt from "Of A Local Nature." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 21, 1896. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1896-02-21/ed-1/seq-1/

[February 21, 1896] -

At Pittsburg, Wm. Southerland shot and killed William Osborn. Osborn was drunk. Southerland was arrested and taken to London, where he was given an examining trial and allowed bail in the sum of $4,000. [] 




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Excerpt from "Somewhat Local." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 10, 1896. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1896-07-10/ed-1/seq-1/

[July 10, 1896] -

Near Norwood, Ky., E. M. Smock was found dead on the railroad track. His head had been cut off. Shell Sutherland and Ansel Wilson have been arrested at Cynthiana, charged with the murder. []





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[] "Just Left the Pen." Morning Herald, Lexington, KY. August 11, 1896. Page 4. Genealogybank.com.

[August 11, 1896] -

John Gruarch, who is now confined in [Somerset] jail charged with murder,




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Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  February 9, 1897. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1897-02-09/ed-1/seq-1/

[February 9, 1897] -

A man named Litteral was arrested at Corbin for the murder of George Baker last summer. Baker was killed and his body placed on the track and run over by a train. while drunk a few days ago Litteral and his wife quarreled. His wife then told that he was the murderer of Baker. He was placed in jail at London. []




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Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  February 19, 1897. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1897-02-19/ed-1/seq-2/

[February 19, 1897] -

The grand jury failed to find indictment against G. A. Parker for killing his father. []


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[] Excerpt form "More Pardons." Morning Herald, Lexington, KY. June 29, 1897. Page 3. Genealogybank.com.

[June 29, 1897] -

Inspector Lester left for Somerset, where he goes as attorney for Decker Perkins, on trial on a charge of murder. []


---

[] Excerpt from "News in the Vicinage." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, Ky. April 5, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-04-05/ed-1/seq-1/

[April 5, 1898] -

The jury in the case of John Satterfield for killing Tom Smith in Pulaski failed to make a verdict after being out three days.  Six were for acquittal and six for two years.  Decker Perkins for killing John Holloway was acquitted. []


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Excerpt from "Somerset."  Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 7, 1897. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1897-09-07/ed-1/seq-1/

[September 7, 1897] -

George Roberts, charged with killing his nephew at Cumberland Falls a few nights ago, was arraigned before Judge Catron Saturday, but the case was continued for lack of witnesses. General opinion is that the deed was done in self-defense.



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"Henry Burton." Morning Herald, Lexington, KY. December 4, 1897. Page 3. Genealogybank.com.

[December 4, 1897] -

HENRY BURTON

KILLS JOHN SMITH--FATAL TERMINATION OF A QUARREL IN PULASKI COUNTY.

Somerset, Ky., Dec. 3.-- Henry Clay Burton killed John Smith at the home of Mac Smith, on Cumberland river, in the edge of Wayne county, last night about 6 o'clock. The trouble arose over a controversy in regard to some discussion.

Burton immediately made his escape and is still at large. Both parties belong to highly respected families and great excitement prevails. []



---

"Murder Over a Game of Cards." Breckenridge News, Cloverport, KY. December 8, 1897. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069309/1897-12-08/ed-1/seq-1/   (col3)

[December 8, 1897] -

Murder Over a Game of Cards.

Somerset, Ky. Dec. 4. -- In a dispute over a game of cards last night, between Henry Clay Burton and John Smith, Smith was killed. The trouble occurred at the home of Mac Smith, on the Cumberland river, in Wayne county. Both men concerned belong to highly respectable families. Burton made his escape. The country is aroused.


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Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 29, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-11-29/ed-1/seq-1/

Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 22, 1897. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1897-10-22/ed-1/seq-3/

Will Tuttle killing John Hamner in Boyle county; "to hades with his boots on"


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some reports say fatal wound, some say murder, but have not found any trial info

Excerpt from "Local Happenings." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 22, 1898. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-02-22/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 22, 1898] -

MURDER.-- Rockcastle had another killing yesterday. A dispatch says that at Mullins Station on the K. C., Geo. Durbin followed John Redwood to a tunnel where he and others were shooting craps and telling Redwood that he had come to kill him, pulled his pistol and fired the fatal shot.  both were K. C. bridge carpenters.  Durbin was arrested and jailed at Mt. Vernon. []



---

[] "He Will Die." Morning Herald, Lexington, KY. February 22, 1898. Page 8. Genealogybank.com.

[February 22, 1898] -

HE WILL DIE

GEO. DURBIN MORTALLY WOUNDS JOHN REDMOND NEAR MT. VERNON.

MT. VERNON, Ky., Feb. 21.-- At Mullins' station this morning, John Redmond was shot and fatally wounded by George Durbin. Durbin and Redmond had a previous difficulty, and the former met Redmond today, when the quarrel was resumed. After telling Redmond he had come to kill him it is said Durbin immediately fired, the ball entering Redmond's breast. Durbin is now in jail. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Local and Otherwise." Mt. Vernon Signal, Mount Vernon, KY. February 25, 1898. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069561/1898-02-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[February 25, 1898] -


Monday morning, near Withers, in a tunnel, Geo. Durbin shot and dangerously wounded John Redmond.  It appears that they had a falling out the day before. Durham followed Redmond to the tunnel where he found him engaged with others shooting craps.  Durbin said: "I have come to shoot you," and fired.  The ball entered the lower portion of Redmond's breast.  Durbin was brought here and jailed. []








---

[] Excerpt from "State Items of Interest." The Central Record, Lancaster, KY. February 25, 1898. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069201/1898-02-25/ed-1/seq-2/

[February 25, 1898] -

Fatally Wounded.

RICHMOND, Ky., Feb 22.-- At Mullin's tunnel, a few miles south of here, two L. & N. bridge carpenters, named Durbin and Redmond, became involved in a quarrel, when Durbin shot Redmond, inflicting a fatal wound.  Durbin escaped. []



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Excerpt from "Matrimonial Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 15, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-03-15/ed-1/seq-1/

[March 15, 1898] -

Unrequited love caused a man at Pittsburg to kill his sweetheart and then himself. []



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Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 18, 1898. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-03-18/ed-1/seq-2/

[March 18, 1898] -

About 100 people assembled at the sink hole on Skaggs' Creek last Sunday to see Messrs. Marler and Moore descend over 200 feet in search of the remains of an unknown person who was supposed to have been murdered near there. Blood had been found spattered on the fence and coagulated in the road, but the case is yet shrouded in mystery for the bottom of the sink hole was not reached. Some newspaper man could get a sensational article if he would visit this spot with his kodak.




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Excerpt from "Local and Otherwise." Mount Vernon Signal, Mt. Vernon, KY. March 25, 1898. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069561/1898-03-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[March 25, 1898] -

Deputy Woods Hopkins shot and killed J. F. Robinson, who resisted arrest at Lily last Saturday. []


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Excerpt from "News in the Vicinage." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 5, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-04-05/ed-1/seq-1/

[April 4, 1898] -

The grand jury at Somerset returned an indictment against Mrs. Permelia Young charging her with beating Mrs. Rains, an old woman, to death, because she said that Mrs. Young's husband had stolen a sow. The old woman was found terribly beaten in a field and died shortly afterwards. []



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http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~kylinco2/Newspaper_Articles/Stevens_George.htm

(Harrodsburg Democrat, Harrodsburg, Mercer Co, Ky Fri Aug 19, 1898)

"George Stevens, colored, aged 17 years, was hanged at Stanford yesterday morning at 9 o’clock."


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Excerpt from "News in the Vicinage." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 29, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-11-29/ed-1/seq-1/

[November 29, 1898] -

Charles Marsee, for killing Richard Stapleton at Lily, Laurel county, was held in $5,000, which he gave. []


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[] Excerpt from "Bloodshed in Pulaski." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. June 19, 1899. Page 1. Newspapers.com.

[June 19, 1899] -

James R. Mills shot and fatally wounded Will Tomlinson at Providence meeting-house, this [Pulaski] county, this morning. Mills was brought to this place [Somerset] for safekeeping by a strong guard. Both are mere boys, Mills being only eighteen, and the wounded boy twenty. When interviewed the prisoner stated that he and a friend passed Tomlinson, and he called to him if he wanted anything he could get it, and on Mills paying no attention to him, Tomlinson ran toward him. Mills ran from him and tripped and fell. He fell on his back, and as Tomlinson came up with him Mills pulled his pistol and shot him in the side. It is thought that Tomlinson can not live. A friend of Tomlinson claims that Mills had been bullying a younger brother of Tomlinson. The pistol used was a cheap pattern bulldog. []



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Excerpt from "News of the Vicinage." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 20, 1899. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1899-06-20/ed-1/seq-1/

[June 20, 1899] -

Two tragedies are reported in Pulaski. Saturday night at Science Hill, Ross Meece shot John Haynes, from the effects of which he died in a short time. Both were drunk. J. R. Mills, 18, shot Will Tomlinson fatally at Providence church in the most cowardly manner. Both  murderers were captured. []


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"Throat Cut." Cincinnati Post, Cincinnati, KY. October 13, 1899. Page 6. Genealogybank.com.

[October 13, 1899] -


THROAT CUT

WIDOW ATTACKED BY A PAIR OF FIENDS.

SOMERSET, KY., Oct. 12. -- (Spl.) At Flat Rock, this county, 23 miles south, on the Cincinnati Southern, Mrs. Mason, a widow, was assaulted and her throat cut by two men, supposed to be white tramps. Mrs Mason has 10 small children. The woods and mountains are being scoured by bodies of men. A lynching is in prospect. Telegrams have been sent here for bloodhounds. []



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