September 15, 2018

Beatty Wickliffe Kills Evan Warren, Boyle, 1889

Previously:

Click here for a list of my other Pulaski/Rockcastle/Laurel County KY articles

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[July 23, 1889] -

DANGEROUSLY WOUNDED. 

Evan Warren Shot by Beatty Wickliffe, a Negro Hackman, at the C. S. Depot. Wickliffe also Shot by Warren. 

The Condition of Warren is Extremely Critical. 

A difficulty took place at the [Danville] depot Monday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock between Evan Warren and Beatty Wickliffe, in which both were probably fatally wounded. Warren was shot through and through twice. Wickliffe received a wound under the right arm and the ball has not been found. So many reports are current regarding the beginning of the trouble that we are not able to give them with any degree of accuracy further than as reported to a representative of the Advocate by Jno. Crouch, who says he saw a portion of the shooting. Said he: "The first of the trouble that I saw was after the first pistol shot was fired. I then turned around and saw Evan Warren with a pistol in his hand and Beatty Wickliffe running. In running, Wickliffe threw a negro boy on the railroad track and the incoming train came near running over him. The next I saw, Bob Mayo and Flem. Murphy had hold of Warren, having wrenched his pistol from him. My attention was then attracted by two pistol shots fired rapidly at Warren while he was held by the two parties mentioned. Warren was shot in the back. He then broke loose and ran and the third shot was fired at him by Wickliffe." Mayo claims that when Warren fired at Wickliffe they grabbed Warren to keep him from shooting, and that when Beatty Wickliffe shot they turned Warren loose. They claim they did not know that Wickliffe was near when he shot Warren. At this writing the doctors are working with the wounded men and both are regarded as dangerously wounded. This is a most unfortunate affair, and from the fact that Warren was disarmed and held while shot down, puts a bad face on the matter for those concerned in it. The difficulty was the termination of a quarrel which the parties had at noon, and in which only fists were used. 

At the time of going to press the physicians stated that Evan Warren's condition is not hopeless, but his wounds are such that his chances for recovery are one in a hundred. One of the balls passed entirely through the body, perforating the liver, while the other struck him squarely in the chest and lodged there. Wickliffe's wound is not considered dangerous. The ball entered the right arm pit and its course was checked after passing a short distance into the flesh. The ball has not been extracted, but the physician says it is near the surface. [1]





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[July 26, 1889] -

MURDERED. -- Mr. Evan S. Warren, who was a brother of Hon. R. C. Warren, was shot by a negro named Beatty Wickliffe at the Danville depot, Monday afternoon and died that night at 10:30. He and the negro had had a difficulty in the morning when the latter remarked that he would see him again. He was as good as his word as the following dying declaration of Mr. Warren shows:

A half hour before his death he made substantially the following statement: 'I believe that I am going to die. The circumstances attending the shooting are as follows: I went to the debot in the omnibus, got out and went into the ladies' waiting room. As I came out Beatty Wickliffe came out of the men's waiting room and followed me to the south end of the platform, glaring at me, and with his right hand in his pocket. As he came up to me he began drawing his pistol. I fired at him and he ran. Just as I fired, Bob Mayho and Flem Murphy, both colored, seized me, one by each arm and wrist, and while they were still holding me Wickliffe, who had run away out of sight, came back, and coming close to me shot me several times."

The murder has caused much excitement in Danville and there is a question as to whether the negroes were holding Mr. Warren as peacemakers or accomplices. They had not been arrested at last accounts, the authorities preferring to await the result of the examining trial. Mr. Warren was a warm-hearted, whole-souled man and leaves many friends, who sincerely regret his untimely taking off. He was conscious nearly up to the last and in response to his brother Dick's question, said he would like to talk with Rev. Dr. Green. He was sent for and after praying with and for him, had a very satisfactory talk on spiritual matters. The funeral occurred Wednesday at Danville, after a service by Dr. Green, and was largely attended. The family, and especially Mr. R. C. Warren, whose engagements must be irksome to him under the circumstances, have the hearty sympathy of everybody. [2]


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[July 26, 1889] -

Wednesday afternoon about 4 o'clock, the county officials had Beatty Wickliffe removed from his father's residence to the county jail. Wickliffe walked across the street to the jail and seemed to be but little inconvenienced by his late wounding. The examining trial is set for this morning at 9 a.m., at which time all of the evidence surrounded the case will be brought out. [3]





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[July 30, 1889] -

The negro, Beatty Wickliffe, charged with the murder of Evan S. Warren, was brought before County Judge Lee Friday to have his examining trial. Neither side being ready, the case was continued until Saturday, August 3. County Attorney Harding and Messrs. Alex Anderson and John W. Yerkes appeared for the prosecution; Ben Lee Hardin, of Harrodsburg, for the defense. Wickliffe's colored brethren of several secret societies believe, or affect to believe, that he is in danger of being mobbed and hang about the jail at night to "protect" him. It is needless to say that intelligent people of both colors think there is no danger whatever of a mob. They know that the accused is in a safe place and are content to wait until the courts pass upon the serious charge upon which he is confined. [4]





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[July 30, 1889] -

POSTPONED. -- Beatty Wickliffe, charged with the killing of Evan S. Warren, was brought before Judge Geo. F. Lee on Friday morning for an examining trial. County Attorney Harding, for the prosecution, stated that the Commonwealth was not ready for an examining trial, and Ben. lee Hardin, of Harrodsburg, Wickliffe's lawyer, also asking for time to get witnesses, etc., the trial, was postponed until Saturday, August 3, at 9 a.m., by which time all witnesses to the tragedy will have been summoned and the facts of the shooting will be fully brought out. Mr. Hardin stated that an important witness for the defense was in Kansas City, and he wished time to have him or her brought to Kentucky. The Court room was crowded with people, the greater number negroes, anxious to hear Wickliffe's statement of the killing and other evidence. A great many were there to get a look at the prisoner and to learn of his condition, which has been reported as very serious, but to a casual observer he seemed to suffer no inconvenience from the shot in his shoulder. The Commonwealth will be represented in the case by Robt. Harding, Alex. Anderson, John W. Yerkes and Phil. B. Thompson, Sr. Ben Lee Hardin, of Mercer, and a gentleman from Garrard, it is said, will defend Wickliffe. [5]





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[August 2, 1889] -


It is quite likely the prosecution will be ready for trial on Saturday, of Beatty Wickliffe, charged with the murder of Evan S. Warren. It is not known what preparation the defense has made. [6]





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[August 6, 1889] -

The examining trial of Beatty Wickliffe, charged with the murder of Evan S. Warren began before county Judge Lee on Saturday and at 4 o'clock P.M. not being concluded was continued until Tuesday at 9 o'clock. Ben Lee Hardin, for the defense, was reinforced by Messrs. George Denny and J. H. Nelhms, of Lexington. In addition to the attorneys named heretofore, Capt. P. B. Thompson, of Harrodsburg, appeared for the prosecution. Nine witnesses have been examined and the testimony thus far equals what was expected by the prosecution. [7]







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[August 6, 1889] -

At nine o'clock Saturday the examining trial of Beatty Wickliffe was begun before Judge Geo. F. Lee. The Commonwealth was represented by Robert Harding, Alex. Anderson and Jolm AV. Yerkes, of this city, and Phil. B. Thompson, Sr., of Harrodsburg; for the defense, Ben. Lee Hardin, of Harrodsburg, Hon. George Denny and J. Henning Nelm, of Lexington, appeared. All witnesses being duly sworn, Thos. Bell was called as first witness for the prosecution. Mr. Bell said, "I came from Junction City on No. 2, in the mail car; was standing in the second door waiting for the clerk to catch the mail off the crane, when an exclamation called my attention to the difficulty. We were crossing the Lebanon pike when I first saw Warren. He was struggling with two negro men -- Bob Mayo and Flem. Murphy -- each holding him by the arm. The train moved up further towards the depot and 1 saw Beatty Wickliffe running up toward the crowd with a pistol: heard two shots fired -- pop-pop, then pop; car stopped and I ran to Warren and helped him into the bus and rode to town with him; saw his wounds and saw his right arm burned with powder." Johu Crouch testified: "I knew Warren; knew Wickliffe; was at the depot waiting for a friend. The first thing I saw was two negroes falling on the track about 30 feet from me. I went towards the bus, within fifteen feet of it; then saw Warren with a pistol in his hand. Bob Mayo grabbed him and was trying to take his pistol away. Saw Flem Murphy grab Warren and take pistol from him; saw Beatty Wickliffe running away; saw him when he did the shooting. He was about 12 feet from me and 12 feet from Warren. I saw Wickliffe fire the second shot. I don't know as I saw him fire his first shot. Wickliffe held his pistol straight out in front of him. There was no one between him and Warren. He was 10 or 12 feet from Warren. He shot three times, the last shot while Warren was running away, and struck him in the back. I saw the bullet make a dent in his white vest. After last shot Warren ran to a telegraph pole. He wrenched his body as if hurt, and said, "You have shot me." I ran to him and helped him in the bus; saw his right sleeve on fire, and some one on the train hallood to me to put it out." County Attorney Harding asked if Warren's pistol had been taken away before Wickliffe fired the first shot. Crouch said "Warren had the pistol in his hand when Wickliffe first shot, but Murphy had taken it from him before the second shot was fired." Crouch thought it was from two to three seconds between Warren's shot and Wickliffe's first. Rev. Mr. Crow testified to seeing the difficulty that took place in morning. Court adjourned at 1:30 o'clock for dinner. P. A. Schrieber, engineer on No. 2, saw pistol taken from Warren before Wickliffe fired; thought it was ten seconds between Warren's shot and Wickliffe's first. On cross examination was positive Warren was disarmed before Wickliffe shot him. John Funk, of Somerset, said he saw Wickliffe shoot. Warren had pistol. Owsley Stanley said he was coming towards the depot; heard the trouble and ran to tbe depot; arrived there and saw Wickliffe run by him from the depot. Wickliffe circled around the men holding Warren and then fired into him from a side position. Thought there were 80 seconds between the first shot and Wickliffe's shot. John Taylor was called, but saw very little of the trouble. At this point the attorneys for the defense, having important business in Lexington, asked an adjournment till to-day at nine o'clock, when' the case will he resumed and the remaining witnesses examined. [8]




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[August 7, 1889] -

The concluding evidence in the case of the Commonwealth versus Beatty Wickliffe, charged with the murder of Evan Warren, was concluded yesterday afternoon and the case argued by able counsel. Judge Lee, when the case was submitted rendered the following decision: "I have endeavored to carefully listen to the arguments of counsel and have no hesitation in deciding to hold him over without bail." [9]






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[August 9, 1889] -

The examining trial of Beatty Wickliffe, charged with the murder of Evan S. Warren, was concluded Tuesday and Wickliffe sent to jail without bond to await the action of the September court. Nothing else could have been done, in the opinion of most people, but a few of Wickliffe's friends think he should have been acquitted on examination. The testimony of the defense seems to be wholly with the view of contradicting the prosecution, whose witnesses are made up almost entirely of men of character and intelligence, whose statements would not be questioned at any time. [10]






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[September 13, 1889] -

There are nine prisoners in the Boyle county jail charged with various crimes, ranging from murder to housebreaking. All of them, we believe, await the action of the grand jury. Their names, together with the crimes with which they are charged, are as follows: Beatty Wickliffe, murder; William Miller, malicious cutting; James Pope, same; Bob French, same; Thomas Haynes, forgery; Warner Gatewood, same; Jump Boner, passing counterfeit money; Steve Dry, attempt to rape; Alex Moreland, housebreaking. [11]






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[September 20, 1889] -

At noon the grand jury made a report finding the f[o]llowing indictments, viz.: Betty Wickliffe, murder; Warner Gatewood, forgery; Thomas Haynes, forgery; Bill Miller, malicious wounding; Edward Boner, counterfeiting. The prisoners were all brought out of jail and after consultation with their lawyers were remanded. Wickliffe's lawyers will be here to-day and then the time will be set for trial. The trials of Bill Miller and Warner Gatewood were set for to-day. The trials of Edward Boner and Thos. Haynes were set for Tuesday. [12]





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[September 24, 1889] -

Ben. Lee Hardin, of Harrodsburg, was here Friday professionally engaged in the case of the Commonwealth vs. Beatty Wickliffe, the trial of which is set for Thursday of this week. [13]





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[September 27, 1889] -


Mr. J. Henning Nelms, a prominent member of the Lexington bar, is here as an attorney in the case of the Commonwealth of Kentucky vs. Beatty Wickliffe, charged with the murder of Evan S. Warren. [14]






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[September 27, 1889] -

Wednesday afternoon the grand jury made a final report to the Court and was discharged. They found about sixty indictments, ranging from murder to petit larceny. Those indicted for murder were Beatty Wickliffe, Bob Mayo and Fleming Murphy. The grand jury was composed of good material, and the way they stuck it to the whisky dives of the town was a caution. ...

At eleven o'clock Thursday morning Sheriff Bailey arrested Fleming Murphy on a bench warrant charged with murder of Evan S. Warren. Murphy was brought into open Court and put in the custody of the jailer. ...

The cases which attracted the most attention during the week were the indictments against Beatty Wickliffe, Fleming Murphy, and Bob Mayor, charged with the murder of Evan Warren. The case against Wickliffe was first called and continued until the 8th day of the February term of the Court, at the request of Wickliffe's attorneys, who stated that a number of important witnesses were absent. He is represented by Judge Geo. Denny and J. Henning Nelms, of Lexington, and Ben Hardin, of Harrodsburg. The Commonwealth is represented by Wm. Herndon, Robt. Harding, Capt. P. B. Thompson, John W. Yerkes, R. C. Warren and Capt. A. Anderson. The question of bail was raised and Saturday morning set for the time at which it would be argued. At the request of the Commonwealth, the case against Flem. Murphy was continued until the next term of court. Bob Mayor has not been arrested, as he moved to Ohio a month ago and the indictments were only found Wednesday. He will be arrested and brought back here. These cases will be watched with deep interest, owing to the circumstances surrounding the murder of Evan Warren by the parties indicted. [15]



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[October 1, 1889] -

Beatty Wickliffe, Fleming Murphy and Bob Mayo were indicted for the murder of Evan Warren case continued till the February term on motion of their attorneys. [16]





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[October 1, 1889] -


BAIL. -- Judge Morrow allowed bail in the sum of $1,500 to Beatty Wickliffe, the negro who killed Evan Warren. The proof before the court must have been very different form that which has reached here to make the case a bailable one. [17]






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[October 1, 1889] -

The case of A. M. Feland vs. Jno. M. White & Co. was called Friday and evidence proceeded with until Saturday noon, at which time the case was adjourned over until Monday, owing to Saturday afternoon having been set as the time for taking the evidence in the Wickliffe case for bail. This matter came up about 2:20 P.M. and a host of witnesses were examined. The examination concluded about 9 o'clock Saturday night, at which time Judge T. Z. Morrow granted Beatty Wickliffe bail in the sum of $1,500, and Fleming Murphy bail in the sum of $250, which they gave and were released. The Court House was thronged with people, white and black, during the entire proceedings, deeply interested in the matter. Much talk has been indulged in regarding the admission of Wickliffe to bail, as it was regarded by many as exceedingly doubtful whether he would get bail or not, and if he did, the general public had fixed the figure much higher. So far as Fleming Murphy's bail is concerned, the action of the Judge met with a general approval. The decision in the matter was not a popular one, and the Judge was aware of that fact, but he did what he conceived to be his duty in the case, regardless of public opinion.

The Feland case was taken up again Monday and will not probably be completed before Tuesday night. It will not only be a relief to the litigants when the great question is settled, but will also cease to be a matter of considerable expense to the State. Some person saw fit to question the opinion of the Judge, thinking he in an uncalled for manner censured the grand jury for finding the indictment against Murphy. Such, however, is far from correct, as the Judge based his opinion, which was delivered in open court, simply upon the testimony as presented to him from a legal standpoint. [18] 



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[February 11, 1890] -

The February term of the Boyle Circuit Court will begin Monday. The civil docket is a very light one and the time of the Court will be mostly taken up with criminal business. There are at present seven prisoners in jail, viz: Thos. Mann, charged with robbery; Richard Bently, grand larceny; Peter Conn, house breaking and stealing; Morrison Gregory, gaming; Thos. Caldwell, Punch Faulconer and Ike Haydon, false swearing. The following persons are out on bond: Jno. Rowsey, charged with murder; Beatty Wickliffe, Fleming Murphy and Bob. Mayo, same offense; Jasper Blackerty, shooting with intent to kill; Elzy Rowsey and young Divine, malicious shooting; Wm. Mann, same offense; Thos. Williams, malicious shooting and wounding; Ed. Duncan, same offense; Wm. Miller, malicious cutting, and Thos. Haynes, forgery. From the above list of persons who are charged with grave offenses against the peace and dignity of the Commonwealth, against society and morality, it will be seen that the Commonwealth's attorney will have his hands pretty full of business during the approaching term of Court. [19]




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[February 21, 1890] -


The case of Beatty Wickliffe, charged with the murder of Even Warren, is set for trial on Tuesday next. It will no doubt draw out a large concourse of people. [20]






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[February 25, 1890] -

The trial of Beatty Wickliffe, the negro who killed Mr. Evan Warren, is set for to-day at Danville and that of Isaac Shelby, Jr., for killing George Lingenfelt, for next Friday. A special venire was ordered in each case. [21]





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[February 25, 1890] -

Circuit Court will convene this (Tuesday) morning. The trial of Beatty Wickliffe, charged with the murder of E. S. Warren, is set for to-day and will draw a large crowd to it provided the case gets to trial. [22]





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[February 28, 1890] -

After the ordinary motions and orders by the attorneys the court called up the case of the Commonwealth vs. Beatty Wickliffe. The State announced itself ready for trial, but Wickliffe's lawyers asked for a continuance upon the grounds that important witnesses were absent. The Commonwealth objected to the continuance, and after considerable wrangling the case went over to Tuesday of next week, at which time it is expected the trial will be proceeded with. [23]





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[February 28, 1890] -


Hon. Geo. Denny and J. Henning Nelms, Lexington, and Ben. Lee Hardin, of Harrodsburg, were here Tuesday engaged as attorneys in the Wickliffe murder trial. [24]






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[March 7, 1890] -


Judge Geo. Denny and J. Henning Nelms, Esq., of Lexington, were here Tuesday as the attorneys of Wickliffe.

Rev. J. C. Crow, of Millersburg, was here Tuesday to testify for the Commonwealth in the case of Beatty Wickliffe. [25]




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[March 7, 1890] -

The business of the court Monday was light, but little of importance being on the docket. The case of the Commonwealth against Beatty Wickliffe, charged with the murder of Evan Warren, is set for this (Tuesday) morning at 9 o'clock. 

BOYLE CIRCUIT COURT. 

Court convened Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock with Judge T. Z. Morrow and Commonwealth's Attorney Wm. Herndon present. The usual orders and motions by the attorneys were gone through with and the case of the Commonwealth against Beatty Wickliffe was called. The Commonwealth announced itself ready for trial and the defense asked for a continuance, basing their grounds on the absence of several important witnesses. The attorneys for Wickliffe filed affidavits, setting forth what the absent witnesses would testify to, but the Commonwealth would not consent to admit them as true, but would consent to let them go before the jury as depositions. This the defense would not consent to, and after much arguing of the law bearing on the case, the continuance was granted. [26]




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[September 19, 1890] -

At half-past 3 o'clock the case of the Commonwealth against Beatty Wickliffe, charged with murder. After a short consultation the attorneys for the Commonwealth announced ready for trial. The attorneys for the defense were busy almost until 6 o'clock consulting and fixing up their affidavit regarding absent witnesses. They finally returned into court, and in order to get several absent witnesses of the defense here the Judge thought it a matter of economy to the State to pay their way rather than a continuance of the case with its heavy expense to the State. The matter was finally set for Wednesday morning. ... The selection of a jury to try Beatty Wickliff was begun at ten o'clock and several panels exhausted without securing a jury. Six men were retained but not accepted as yet, and the Sheriff was ordered to Casey county to summon fifty jurors to appear here at two o'clock Thursday afternoon and the case was passed until that time. ... Sheriff Bailey having returned from Casey county with a venire of fifty men summoned for the purpose of getting jurors for the Wickliffe case, twelve men were selected by the Commonwealth and the defense rejected six of the twelve, leaving the following: H. L. Worley, Boyle county, Adam Ellis, Clint. Anderson, J. R. Lane, Jonathan Gadberry and Reuben Minor, from Casey county. Sixteen of the fifty had reported and the court was taking time waiting for the appearance of the other jurors. [27]



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[September 19, 1890] -

The case of Beatty Wickliffe, the negro who killed Evan Warren, was called at Danville Wednesday and a fruitless effort made to get a jury in the county. Judge Morrow then ordered the sheriff to go to Casey and summon 50 men to report yesterday. The trial will occupy the rest of the week, if indeed it does not take longer. The prisoner is represented by Ben Lee Hardin, George Denny and Mr. Nell and Capt. Herndon is assisted by John W. Yerkes, Robert Harding and Phil Thompson, Sr. Rev. John M. Crowe, now of Denver, who witnessed the murder, came all the way to testify in the case. [28]






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[September 26, 1890] -

CIRCUIT COURT. -- The trial of Beatty Wickliffe, charged with the murder of Evan S. Warren, terminated Tuesday morning at ten o'clock, when the jury returned a verdict of guilty of manslaughter and fixed the punishment at confinement in the penitentiary for two years. The jury wrestled with the case for about twenty-four hours before reaching a verdict. It is currently reported that upon the first ballot eight jurors were for acquittal and four for a long term in the penitentiary. A compromise verdict, it will be seen, was the result. The verdict is by no means a popular one, as it was generally believed that Wickliffe would certainly go to the penitentiary for from eight to ten years. In his case there was no possible escape from the penitentiary; the only question was as to the length of time, and the law, though to some extent vindicated, was not carried out to the letter. [29]





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[September 26, 1890] -

After wrestling with the case a day, the jury let Beatty Wickliffe off with two years for the murder of Evan Warren. The verdict does not give satisfaction by any means, as the punishment is not such as the crime deserved. [30]





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[June 23, 1891] -

ANOTHER'S WIFE. -- It seems that Rev. J. S. Harris, until a few weeks ago pastor of the colored Presbyterian church in this city [Danville], and whose sacred duty it was to elucidate the commandment that "Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's wife," has himself fallen a victim to the tempter and prostituted his high calling. The female in the case is the wife of Beatty Wickliffe, now serving a term in the penitentiary. Harris came here some two or three years ago, and being a good preacher and an engaging fellow generally, at once took a prominent part in colored circles, and much surprise was created by his resignation some two weeks ago. He resigned, he said, to accept a call to a church in Indianapolis. About this time, according to her father-in-law's story, the woman took a notion to visit her mother in Ohio, and Harris, who had been a very frequent visitor, industriously aided in preparing for her departure. We are not informed that they left together, but one Smith, a colored man, who formerly resided here, but lately of Cincinnati, was in Danville last week and said Harris and the Beatty woman came into his boarding house in Cincinnati and registered as "J. S. Harris and wife." the affair created a sensation among the colored people here and a great many discredited the story. Harris always acted the gentleman so far as we know while in Danville. [31]




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[June 30, 1891] -

"A MALICIOUS LIE," 

Is What Rev. J. S. Harris Terms the Report Coupling His Name With the Wife of Beatty Wickliffe. 

The following letter has been received from Rev. J. S. Harris, from Indianapolis, concerning whom an item was published in these columns last week. As it has never been the Advocate's policy to wilfully misrepresent any one, the other side of the story is cheerfully given: 

Indianapolis, Ind., June 25, 1891. 

Editor of Advocate: 

Dear Sir:-- Please allow space for the following, in answer to an article that appeared in your paper of the 23d inst.: 

The rumors and reports there that I registered with Mrs. Wicklifte as man and wife, or that I ran away with her are absolutely false. The whole report is a malicious libel.

Wickliffe tells a malicious falsehood, as I can prove in the city of Danville, when he says that I packed his daughter-in-Iaw's things to go home. What I did do was in keeping with what I was doing for him and his family at that time. When his son Joseph ran away from Danville to escape the penalty of the law taking with him the last overcoat his father had, I gave the old man my heavy overcoat, which originally cost me $30. I did this when it was cold and went with a very thin overcoat. I read his letters from Joseph and answered the same, read letters from his daughter Nancy and answered them. I read the letters from his son in prison and answered them. And when his son was in jail in Danville awaiting trial I wrote letters for the old man to every colored Masonic lodge the State of Kentucky, over thirty in number, asking them for money to aid him in the law suit. And when these lodges sent money, I replied thanking him. This is not all I have done for him, but let us reason: Therefore when his daughter-in-law had packed her things for shipment, and asked me to address or mark them, which I did. Now, sir, what else would any one have done under the circumstances? He was continually coming to my room for me, as I can prove, either to get me to read or write letters for him. Oft times he would take me from the church to do the same. After all this it was but natural that his daughter should call on me to direct the things for her. I say it, sir, reverently, respectfully and considerately, that they have maliciously lied, and I shall vindicate myself.

J. S. Harris. 

P. S. -- I only wish I had more space in your valuable paper to set this matter right. J. S. H. [32]




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[September 22, 1891] -

The indictment against Bob Mayo, one of the negroes engaged in the Evan Warren killing, was continued. [33]





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[March 19, 1892] -


A Convict's Wife.

At the September term, 1890, of the Circuit Court of Boyle County, Kentucky, Beatty Wickliffe was convicted of manslaughter and sent to the penitentiary for two years. He is still there. Yesterday his wife Lucy sued for divorce in the Court of his imprisonment as a ground for divorce. They were married in 1881 at Danville, Ky., and have two children. She asks to be restored to her maiden name. Giauque & McClure, attorneys. [34]




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[March 25, 1892] -

The Cincinnati Enquirer says that the wife of Beatty Wickliffe, the negro who was sent up by the Boyle circuit court for killing Evan Warren, has brought suit for divorce, setting forth his conviction for a felony as grounds for it. She asks the custody of her two children and a restoration to her maiden name. [35]





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[June 24, 1892] -


Lucy Wickliffe, the wife of Beatty Wickliffe, who was sent to the penitentiary from Boyle county for killing Evan Warren, was granted a divorce from Wickliffe in Cincinnati, Tuesday, on the grounds of his incarceration in the penitentiary. [36]





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[January 17, 1893] -

Bob Mayo, murder, continued. [37]




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[April 21, 1893] -

In the circuit court the following cases have been disposed of since Monday: Commonwealth vs. Wm. Mann, malicious wounding; same vs. May Barbee, bawdy house; Bob Mayo, murder; John Fisher, bawdy house; John Raney, assault; Thos. Calhoun, 1 and 2, concealed weapons; Jas. Pope, malicious cutting; Hugh Daugherty, gaming; J. R. Daugherty, 1 and 2, selling whisky -- all continued. [38]





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[April 18, 1894] -

The following cases were continued: Bob Mayo, murder; [39]





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[September 12, 1894] -

The following cases were continued until the next term: Robert Mayo, murder; [40]





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[January 23, 1895] -

The following cases were filed away, with leave to reinstate: Bob Mayo, murder; [41]





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[1] "Dangerously Wounded." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. July 23, 1889. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[2] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 26, 1889. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-07-26/ed-1/seq-3/

[3] Excerpt from "Danville and Vicinity." Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. July 26, 1889. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[4] Excerpt from "Danville, Boyle County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 30, 1889. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-07-30/ed-1/seq-3/

[5] Excerpt from "Danville and Vicinity." Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. July 30, 1889. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[6] Excerpt from "Danville, Boyle County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 2, 1889. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-08-02/ed-1/seq-1/

[7] Excerpt from "Danville, Boyle County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 6, 1889. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-08-06/ed-1/seq-1/

[8] Excerpt from "Danville and Vicinity." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. August 6, 1889. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[9] Excerpt from "Danville and Vicinity." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. August 7, 1889. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[10] Excerpt from "Danville, Boyle County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 9, 1889. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-08-06/ed-1/seq-2/

[11] Excerpt from "Danville and Vicinity." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. September 13, 1889. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[12] Excerpt from "Circuit Court." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. September 20, 1889. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[13] Excerpt from "Personal Mention." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. September 24, 1889. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[14] Excerpt from "Personal Mention." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. September 27, 1889. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[15] Excerpts from "Boyle Circuit Court." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. September 27, 1889. Page 8. Newspapers.com.

[16] Excerpt from Column 3. The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 1, 1889. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-10-01/ed-1/seq-4/

[17] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 1, 1889. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-10-01/ed-1/seq-3/

[18] Excerpt from "Boyle Circuit Court." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. October 1, 1889. Page 8. Newspapers.com.

[19] Excerpt from "Danville and Vicinity." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. February 11, 1890. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[20] Excerpt from "Danville and Vicinity." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. February 21, 1890. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[21] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 25, 1890. Page 3. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1890-02-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[22] Excerpt from "Danville and Vicinity." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. February 25, 1890. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[23] Excerpt from "Boyle Circuit Court." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. February 28, 1890. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[24] Excerpt from "Personal Mention." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. February 28, 1890. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[25] Excerpt from "Personal Mention." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. March 7, 1890. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[26] Excerpt from Column 5. The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. March 7, 1890. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[27] Excerpts from "Danville and Vicinity." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. September 19, 1890. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[28] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 19, 1890. Page 3. LOC. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1890-09-19/ed-1/seq-3/

[29] Excerpt from "Danville and Vicinity." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. September 26, 1890. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[30] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 26, 1890. Page 3. LOC. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1890-09-26/ed-1/seq-3/

[31] Excerpt from "Danville and Vicinity." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. June 23, 1891. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[32] "A Malicious Lie."  The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. June 30, 1891. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

[33] Excerpt from "Danville and Vicinity." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. September 22, 1891. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[34] "A Convict's
Wife." The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, OH. March 19, 1892. Page 16. Newspapers.com.

[35] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 25, 1892. Page 5. LOC. https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1892-03-25/ed-1/seq-5/

[36] Excerpt from "Danville and Vicinity." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. June 24, 1892. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[37] Excerpt from "Circuit Court." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. January 17, 1893. Page 3. Newspapers.com.


[38] Excerpt from "Danville." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 21, 1893. Page 1. LOC. 

[39] Excerpt from "Circuit Court." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. April 18, 1894. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[40] Excerpt from "Circuit Court." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. September 12, 1894. Page 3. Newspapers.com.

[41] Excerpt from "Bob Jones Gets Two Years." The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, KY. January 23, 1895. Page 3. Newspapers.com.




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