October 6, 2020

Violence Relating to Elections, 1867 - 1897

[Per usual, this is not a comprehensive list. Notably missing is info on the violence that erupted in Lancaster in 1874 related to an election there. I'm in the process of making a seperate post on that and it's taking longer than expected.]

-----------

[ROCKCASTLE] [1867] -

Kentucky Senate Candidate Kills Man At Poll Site


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Excerpt from "Pulaski Column." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 9, 1873. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1873-05-09/ed-1/seq-3/

[PULASKI] [May 9, 1873] -


In the evening after the voting was about over a spirited debate arose upon the streets between two colored divines which attracted a large crowd composed of both white and black, who were laughing heartily and enjoying the fun until some mischievous fellow threw a large sized fire-cracker into the crowd which exploded dispersing them in double quick, presenting one of the most ludicrous scenes we ever witnessed.



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


[GARRARD] [August 1874] -

Wiliam Sellers, E. B. Kennedy, and The 'Lancaster Riot', Garrard, 1874 (coming eventually...)


At the August election of 1874, Elbert Kennedy ran as an independent candidate for Circuit Clerk against J. K. Faulkner, the Republican nominee, and was defeated. William Sellers was also running for some office on the Republican ticket. Kennedy and Sellers exchanged shots at each other in the public square one night following the election, "and that was the commencement of the celebrated Kennedy and Sellers' war. Suffice it to say that all the Kennedy's who had not previously left the country were in it; that the United States troops were put in rout when they attempted to interfere, and that many whites and blacks were killed." Three years later, Elbert Kennedy was killed by his nephew Grove Kennedy on the courthouse steps in Lancaster.


October 4, 2020

Killing of Walter Saunders and Tuck Ballard, Madison, 1877

Links to images for this post can be found with the citations at the end of the post. Due to Blogger's new interface 'update,' I can no longer nest images beside text without a huge headache.

---

[March 8, 1872] -

The Race for Sheriff.

By reference to our columns it will be seen that W. G. Saunders, the present incumbent, announces himself as a candidate for re-election. Rumor is to the effect that we are to have quite a number of candidates for the office of sheriff. Why don't you announce yourselves, gentlemen? [1]



---

[March 12, 1875] -

Our former popular Sheriff, Mr. W. G. Saunders, has gone into the Hotel business at Crab Orchard. He informs us that his hotel will be first-class in all its appointments, and that he will run in connection with his hotel, a livery stable, where the fastest horses and nicest turnouts can be procured. We wish him the most unlimited success, and trust that no "Civil Rights" will disturb "the even tenor of his way." Read his card elsewhere. [2]



---

[March 12, 1875] -

[Advertisement]
The Crab Orchard Hotel.
Crab Orchard, Ky.,
W. G. Saunders, Proprietor.
Accommodations Unexcelled.
Excellent Bar.
No. 1 Livery Stable
Connected with the Hotel. [3]


---

July 27, 2020

Postmaster William Hedger Killed By Brother-in-Law, Garrard, 1874

Previously:

Click here for a list of my other Pulaski/Rockcastle/Laurel County KY articles

-----------


[December 25, 1874] -

Horrible Murder in Lancaster! Postmaster Wm. Hedger, Assaulted and Killed by Nese Best and Andy Conn.

On Monday afternoon, last, Wm. Hedger, Postmaster at Lancaster, a quiet, inoffensive citizen, and an efficient officer, was assaulted in his office, in Lancaster, and instantly killed by Nese Best and Andy Conn, citizens of the Paint Lick section of Garrard county, and notoriously dangerous characters.

We were in Lancaster on Tuesday, and found the citizens, as a general thing, afraid to speak of, or express an opinion about the awful tragedy, above a whisper, however, we gathered the following particulars of the killing, from reliable sources. We record the terrible crime, but refrain from commenting upon it, for the reason that it is not always safe for a Journalist to undertake to condemn in adequate terms the perpetrators of a crime, when the people in the locality in which is was perpetrated have not the boldness and true bravery to rise up in their might and protect themselves and their neighbors, officers and advisers, and maintain, at all hazards, the majesty of the law. Without making a diagnosis, or furnishing a prescription for the present case, we will venture to suggest that "desperate cases require heroic and desperate treatment."

Several months ago, Hedger, the deceased, married the sister of his deceased wife, who was also a sister to the wife of Best. -- Best forbade, without the shadow of authority, this marriage, and after its consummation, threatened the life of Hedger. Best being a dangerous character, having taken the lives of some four or five men within the past few years, Hedger has lived in continual dread of his carrying the treat into execution.

On last Monday, Best, in company with Conn, visited Lancaster, and during the day became intoxicated. Hedger, fearing an assault, locked his office and remained concealed sometime, but a few minutes before the arrival of the Louisville mail, he returned to his office to attend to his imperative duties, and just as he entered the door, Conn and Best approached it from different directions and commenced firing. Hedger fell, mortally wounded, if not killed, from the first fire. Other shots were fired after he fell, and four shots took effect. His wife heard the firing and instinctively devined the cause, and she was the first to go to the dead body of her husband. The scene which then ensued beggars description. She was carried away from the scene of the shocking tragedy heart-broken and insensible; while the perpetrators of it walked leisurely away, brandishing their weapons and boasting of the cruel deed.

Writs for the arrest of Best and Conn were immediately placed in the hands of officers Miller and Singleton. As they approached the men, determined to arrest them at all hazards, they were met by the sheriff of the county, Mr. W. M. Kerby, who informed them that Conn and Best had placed themselves in his custody, and he was responsible for their detention. So far, so good; but the sequel shows that these men who had but a moment before shot down in cold blood, a defenseless and inoffensive citizen, were suffered to go from the very clutches of an offended and outraged law, upon the mere promise that they would return the next day for trial!

We simply record this ugly circumstance connected with an awful tragedy that blackens the blood-stained annals of crime in Kentucky, with the ope that it is a mistake. It is a grave charge to make against an officer of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, and we disclaim its authorship.

LATER -- AND MORE TROUBLE. -- We learn from a gentleman who came over from Lancaster on Wednesday morning, that Best and Conn had not been arrested, tho' the Sheriff and his deputy went in quest of them Tuesday. We also learn that Best and Conn state that Hedger fired upon them first. A small loaded Durrenger was found in Mr. Hedger's pocket. No other weapons were found upon his person or in his office. Best promises to surrender for trial as soon as the excitement subsides. [1]



June 30, 2020

Elisha Sloan Kills Silas Isaacs, Rockcastle, 1876

Previously:

Click here for a list of my other Pulaski/Rockcastle/Laurel County KY articles

-----------


[September 13, 1878] -

SURRENDERED.

Elisha Sloan, who is indicted in our Circuit Court for the murder of Silas Isaacs, in 1876, and who has since been a fugitive from justice, came into town [Mt. Vernon] Monday and surrendered himself to the Jailer. He was committed to jail and will have his trial at the September Term of Court. [1]


---

[September 17, 1878] -

A difficulty occurred in 1876, between Silas Isaacs and Elijah Sloan, resulting in the death of the former. Sloan was indicted for the murder, but was never captured. His whereabouts were a mystery, though no vigorous search was made to discover them. Last Monday morning he surprised everybody by coming into town and surrendering himself to the Jailer. He says he is innocent, and wants a trial at the approaching term. [2]


June 27, 2020

Articles Describing the County Jails, 1850-1920

Previously:

Click here for a list of my other Pulaski/Rockcastle/Laurel County KY articles

-----------

This is a collection of articles describing some of the county jails. This includes some articles about jailbreaks because those often describe aspects of the building when describing how prisoners escaped. 


---------------------------------------------------------------------------
DANVILLE, BOYLE COUNTY
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

(also in leads)
[] "Boyle County Jail Unlocked and Two Prisoners Escaped." The Louisville Daily Courier, Louisville, KY. May 29, 1860. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

[May 29, 1860] -


BOYLE COUNTY JAIL UNLOCKED AND TWO PRISONERS ESCAPED. -- On Wednesday night the prison cells of the Boyle county jail were unlocked, and two of the four prisoners escaped. Thos. D. McGrath, who some months ago killed Benj. Proctor, and George Anderson, accused of horse stealing. There were two others confined, who say they did not know their cells were unlocked.

The jailor, Mr. Harness, was away from home, and the supposition is that a servant girl, who slept in the room with Mrs. Harness, had been bribed to steal the cell keys. On the morning after the prisoners had gotten out she ran away from home. -- [Frankfort Commonwealth. []


June 19, 2020

Jerry Brown Kills John Engleman Sr., Lincoln, 1877

Previously:

Click here for a list of my other Pulaski/Rockcastle/Laurel County KY articles

-----------


[September 14, 1877] -

KILLED. -- Mr. John Engleman, Sr., whose skull was crushed on Friday, by a rock thrown by a negro named Jerry Brown, died at the residence of Mr. J. M. Martin, on Saturday evening. The difficulty occurred near Highland, and originated in a jocular suggestion to the negro, as to the proper way to make his balking team pull. The negro made an insolent reply and just then succeeded in making his horses pull out. Mr. Engleman completed his business and rode on to town, but before proceeding far overtook the negro, to whom he spoke in regard to his insolence. The negro was very insulting and Mr. Engleman made a lick at him with his whip. The negro then jumped down and got a rock and threw at Mr. Engleman, who also got off his horse and attempted to get a rock, but while he was bending down the scamp again threw, this time with the force and precision of a bullet, the rock striking the old man a little back of the top of his skull crushing it in. As badly hurt as he was, Mr. Engleman succeeded in getting upon his horse but by the time he reached Mr. Martin's he had become so weak that he was forced to dismount and spend the night. He did not complain much, so the services of a physician was not called till next day, when Drs. Peyton, Craig and McRoberts were sent for, and examination immediately convinced them that the skull was badly crushed and was pressing on the brain. They knew that to relieve this pressure was the only hope to prolong his life but the operation had been postponed too long and Mr. Engleman died in the course of the evening. Meanwhile search was commenced for the negro, who, on learning the condition of his victim, had set out to make his escape; but the determination of those who had attempted his capture was too great for him and on the news being carried to Somerset and a reward offered, Messrs. S. T. Wolsey and J. F. Barker, set out up the railroad and succeeded in finding the negro in a shanty about two miles above town. They took him to town and next day brought him to this place and lodged him in jail; but there being grave apprehensions of summary punishment he waved an examining trial and was taken to the Junction and sent to the Jail at Richmond. The remains of Mr. Engleman were taken to his home and after a funeral sermon by the Rev. Mr. Smith, were consigned to the earth with the honors of Masonry, of which Order he was a consistent member. Deceased was about 70 years of age, and was well known throughout this country, and although possessed of peculiarities, was much liked and respected. His family have our warmest sympathy in their bereavement. [1]