November 19, 2013

Election Day Shootout Involves Sheriff, Causes Langford/Mullins Feud, 1897-1899

Previously:

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[November 3, 1897] -

THREE KILLED

IN AN ELECTION BROIL IN MT. VERNON ON CROOKED CREEK.

Mt. Vernon, Ky., Nov. 2.-- A number of tough characters created a disturbance at the Crooked Creek Precinct in this county this afternoon.  Sheriff Mullins attempted to restore order when a general shooting affair took place between the Sheriff and his deputies and the disturbers, three of the latter being killed.  The dead are Henry Langford, John Lawrence and Charles Payne. [1]








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[November 5, 1897] -

On the day of the election three men were shot at the Crooked Creek precinct. One Mr. Henry Langford is dead, while Chess Payne and John Lawrence are in a critical condition. [2]



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[November 5, 1897] -

Mt. Vernon, Nov. 4.-- Sheriff W. G. Mullins, John C. Mullins, Frank Mullins, Bill Mullins, Charles Harris and Willis Sigman, who were in the bloody fight at Crooked Creek election day, arrived here on the noon train accompanied by officers.  They at once marched to jail where the prisoners are now under a strong guard to prevent violence.  All of the above were summoned by Sheriff Mullins to assist in keeping order around the polls on election day.  Several parties became very boisterous and abusive towards the sheriff on account of his having declared his intention of voting the "Independent Ticket."  The sheriff attempted to make an arrest.  He was fired upon when a regular volley followed.  One man was killed and two badly wounded; none of the sheriff's posse were injured.  Owing to the excited condition of the county over the hotly contested election, Sheriff Mullins, after consulting legal advice, decided to wait until to day before surrendering.  Early this A.M. friends of the slain and wounded men came to town heavily armed.  When the noon train arrived the sheriff's friends were similarly fixed.  No demonstration was made by anyone. Judge Colyer, county attorney, says when the case is called he will demand that all parties entering the courthouse shall be disarmed. [3]




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[November 6, 1897] -

SHERIFF IN JAIL

MUST ANSWER FOR THE ELECTION DAY KILLING IN ROCKCASTLE COUNTY.

Mt. Vernon, Ky., Nov. 5.-- Sheriff W. G. Mullins, John C. Mullins, Frank Mullins, Bill Mullins, Charley Harris and Willis Sigman, who were in the bloody fight at Crooked Creek on election day, arrived here under arrest.  They were immediately marched to jail, where the prisoners are now under strong guard to prevent violence.  All of the above constituted the force summoned by Sheriff Mullins to assist in keeping order around the polls on election day.

Several parties became very boisterous and abusive to the Sheriff on account of his having declared his intention of voting the independent ticket.  The Sheriff attempted to make an arrest.  He was fired upon and a regular battle followed.  Henry Langford was killed and Charley Payne and John Lawrence were badly wounded.  None of the Sheriff's posse was injured.

Owing to the excited condition of the county over the hotly contested election Sheriff Mullins, after consulting legal advice, decided to wait until yesterday before surrendering.  Early in the morning friends of the dead man and the wounded came to town heavily armed.  When the noon train arrived the Sheriff's friends were similarly fixed.  No demonstration was made by anyone.  Judge Coyler says when the case is called he will demand that all parties entering the court room shall be disarmed. [4]








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[November 12, 1897] -


The trial of Sheriff Mullins and the men summoned by him to keep the peace at Crooked Creek precinct the day of the election is being held today (Thursday) before Mr. Hiram McKinney. [5]






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[January 11, 1898] -

A dispatch from Mt. Vernon says that W. C. Hundley shot and almost instantly killed John W. Lawrence at Orlando. The shooting was done with a 38-caliber Winchester rifle. Hundley immediately surrendered himself to the officers. Lawrence was shot through the body in the election fight at Crooked Creek, but that had no connection with the killing. [6]





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[January 11, 1898] -

DEADLY DUEL

Between the Langfords and Mullins in Mt. Vernon.

One Man Fatally Shot and Another Is Slightly Wounded.

Mt. Vernon, Ky., Jan. 10.-- This county is again disgraced today.  Elza and Pat Langford, who were attending the trial of Wm. Hundley, who killed John Lawrence last week, opened fire this afternoon on the Mullins people, who were standing on the opposite side of the street near the Courthouse.  Ex-Jailer C. L. King, who was sitting near, was fatally wounded by two balls passing through his left side and hip.  The Mullins returned fire, but did no injury to their enemies.  A feud exists between the Langfords and Mullins, on account of one of the Langfords who was killed at the last election by Sheriff Mullins.  The Langfords are now in jail.  Others are under arrest and there is more excitement than old Rockcastle has seen for many years. [7]



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[January 11, 1898] -

SHOOTING AT MT. VERNON. -- A fight occurred at Mt. Vernon last P. M. by Elza and Pat Langford on one side and the Mullins crowd on the other, the Langfords using "Winchesters" and the Mullins revolvers.  C. L. King, ex-jailer, was shot twice through hip and will probably die.  He was a bystander.  One of the Mullins was shot through fingers.  No one else hurt.  The Langfords were jailed. [8]


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[January 11, 1898] -

KENTUCKY F[UED. 

Serious Shooting Affray at Mount Vernon, Kentucky.

Mount Vernon, Ky., Jan. 10.--At the execution trial of Wm. Hundley for killing John Lawrence, Judge Williams today ordered the court room cleared so that all who desired to return might be examined by an officer for weapons and disarmed. Five minutes afterwards Winchester rifles in front of the court house in the hands of Pat and Eliza Langford were fired at ex-Jailor William Mullins and his friends. Several revolvers replied from various quarters. Two men were injured. In the court room when the shooting occurred Hundley thought his father had been killed. Seizing the gun of a guard he attempted to rush to the fray, and it required six men to hold him. The trouble originated during the last campaign when a number of leading republicans bolted the ticket nominated, among them being Sheriff Mullins, Mr. Jing and many others. At Crooked Creek precinct at the November election, Sheriff Mullins attempted to arrest some parties. A fight came up when one of the Langford boys was killed and two others wounded, including Joseph Lawrence who was killed a few days ago by Wm. Hundley. A feud is growing and its end is not in sight. [9]




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[January 21, 1898] -

William Mullins, who was shot through the hands is improving.


Mr. King, who was shot is getting along very well though his wounds are painful at times. [10]


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[January 21, 1898] -

We want to correct brother Walton and others and give them to distinctly understand that the shooting of the Mullins' and Langfords in which King was shot, occurred in your town (Mt. Vernon) and not in Livingston as reported by the press.

[Some Livingston man who took it upon himself sent in a "special" by wire and mixed up the whole affair. Ed.] [11]


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[January 28, 1898] -

A dispatch from Mt. Vernon says: The hatchet has been buried and peace again reigns in Rockcastle. The Langford and Mullins factions met here Tuesday, shook hands and agreed that no more fighting would be done between them. It is a great relief to all, as things had reached the point where every moment was expected to bring on more hostilities. People were afraid to come to town, fearing trouble at all times. [12]



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[February 8, 1898] -

Drs. Brown, Lovell, Davis and Lusk opened the wounds of C. L. King Sunday afternoon and removed several pieces of shattered bullets.  One ball which entered the hip joint could not be reached.  The patient rested very well last night though the doctors give little encouragement of his ultimate recovery.  He is growing weaker. [13]


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[February 25, 1898] -

About 60 indictments have been returned. No indictment has been found against Sheriff Mullins and posse who figured in the Crooked Creek killing. Charles Harris, on trial for murder, was acquitted; [14]



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[March 4, 1898] -

Another surgical operation was performed on Mr. C. L. King and his chances for recovery are better. [15]



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[March 29, 1898] -


Shot From Ambush.

LIVINGSTON, Ky., March 29.-- William Hundley, who shot and killed John Lawrence at Brush creek, this county, about a month ago, was fired upon 14 times from behind a pile of cross ties, while waiting for a train at Brush creek Sunday. He is only slightly wounded. [16]

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[April 1, 1898] -

Wm. Hundley has sworn out warrants against Elza and Pate Langford charging them with having fired fifteen shots at him last Saturday afternoon while he was standing on his father's door step at Brush Creek Station. Hundley got his shot gun but was prevented by his mother from going out. In her efforts to take the weapon it was discharged and the load came near striking her. The Langfor'ds have surrendered to 'Squire Gatliff in Cooked Creek district. [17]


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[April 5, 1898] -

Fourteen shots were fired at Will Hunley as he stood on the porch of his father's home on Brush Creek. He had the Langford boys indicted for the shooting. [18]



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[April 8, 1898] -

DEAD. -- After lingering two months, ex-Jailer C. L. King, of Mt. Vernon, is dead from the effects of wounds at the hands of the Langfords.  Pate Langford was jailed, but Elza Langford was not found. [19]



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[April 15, 1898] -

After 53 days of pain, which he heroically endured, the iron constitution of Mr. L. C. King at last yielded, and death came to his relief as stated in these columns at the time. He confessed Christ early in life, but was more firmly convinced of the wonders and beauties of His love as he lay upon a bed of unalleviated pain. He conversed touchingly with men who showed no love for religion and brought them to their knees by his bedside. A wife and four children weep for him. Bro. Ira M. Boswell preached the funeral sermon at the Christian church, throwing into the discourse all the tenderness of a gentle heart and adducing beautiful lessons for the living. The remains were interred at the old family burying ground. [20]


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[April 15, 1898] -

WITHOUT BAIL. -- Dr. E. J. Brown, who came from Mt. Vernon yesterday tells us that Pate and Elza Langford were held without bail for killing L. C. King.  It will be remembered that King recieved his wounds during the fight between the Langfords and Mullins.  The doctor says that Mr. C. C. Williams, for the prosecution, made the finest speech ever heard in Mt. Vernon. [21]


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[April 23, 1898] -

Pete and Eliza Langford, charged with mortally wounded ex-Jailer C. L. King, of Rockcastle county, after a two days preleminary trial at Mt. Vernon, were remanded to jail without bail. [22]



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[May 27, 1898] -

As stated in our last issue, the criminal docket is a big one this court and the term will last two weeks or more.  Twelve men are to be tried for murder and it does look like at least one hanging might be gotten out of that number.  It has been 20-odd years since Rockcastle has had a legal rope stretching and her heavy criminal docket is proof conclusive that she needs one now and needs it badly.  It is thought that most of the murder cases will be tried this court.  John Jarrett, who has had two hung juries, answered ready for the killing of Buck Padgett and his jury was secured with little trouble Monday afternoon.  Pate Langford, who with his brother, Elza, shot ex-Jailer King, from the effects of which he died, is ill in jail and may not be able to go through his trial.  There were 20 prisoners in jail Monday night.

The visiting attorneys at court so far  are Hon. Fontaine Fox Bobbitt, and Messrs. W. A. Morrow and Calhoun.  The latter lawyer is from Lexington.  Mr. C. C. Williams is in every case of importance and has his hands full. [23]


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[June 3, 1898] -

The trial of Ex-Sheriff Mullins for killing Langford at Crooked Creek last November was to have been called Thursday.  That of the Langfords for killing L. C. King is set for Friday.  Several other murder cases are on the docket. [24]



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[June 10, 1898] -

The trial of Elza and Pate Langford for killing L. C. King has been in progress this week.  Messrs. Morrow and Bethurum & Bethurum were for the defense and Messrs. Colyer, Lester, Sharp and Williams for the prosecution.  Thirty-two witnesses for the prosecution were on the stand and half that number on the opposite side.  The court-house was crowded to its utmost seating capacity Wednesday to hear the speaking, a large part of the audience being composed of ladies.  The speakers were Messrs. L. W. Bethurum, Lester, Morrow and Sharp.  Each handled his side of the question most skillfully, and to one wholly uninitiated in such matters the manner in which evidence was handled to fit each side of the case was most startling. [25]


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[June 10, 1898] -

The case of Commonwealth of Ky., against Pate and Elza Langford was called last Friday.  J. N. Sharp, C. C. Williams, C. W. Lester an P. D. Colyer represented the prosecution and W. A. Morrow and Bethurum & Bethurum for the defendants.  The task of getting a jury was begun and after nearly a day spent it was discovered that a jury could not be secured in this county.  The sheriff was instructed to summon fifty men from Pulaski county to report here on Monday morning.  On that date the following named jurors were selected from the fifty Pulaski citizens who were on hands:  Andrew McKinney, J. D. Randall, J. K. Fulcher, Daniel Green, W. F. Deatherage, S. S. Lovell, G. S. Woodall, J. W. Hansford, Wm McBee, W. E. McDowell, W. T. Perkins and N. W. Ashhurst.  The taking of testimony was begun Monday afternoon and finished up Wednesday morning.  About sixty witnesses were examined.  Thirty-two for the Commonwealth.  The case was ably handled by both sides.  Arguments were begun Wednesday afternoon and finished that night.  Four speeches were made.  The case was given to the jury at 8 o'clock yesterday morning which were unable to agree.  Six were for acquittal and six for conviction from two to five years, or two years if the other six would agree.  The court placed bound at $500 each, which defendant gave and were released. [26]


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[June 14, 1898] -

Only one person was sent to the penitentiary from the Rockcastle circuit court which adjourned Saturday, not withstanding there with a round dozen men charged with murder.  John Jarrett got three years for killing Buck Padgett, as has been stated before in these columns, but the others either got their cases continued or had hung juries.  Pate and Elza Langford, who shot L. C. King, from the effects of which he died, had a hung jury, six for acquittal and six for a term in the pen. [27]

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[September 23, 1898] -

Elza and Peyton Langford; murder; continued. [28]

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[September 30,  1898] -

Ex-Judge J. B. Lair and County Superintendent W. A. B. Davis, of Rockcastle, were here Tuesday to secure 40 men to select a jury from to try ex-Sheriff W. G. Mullins for killing Henry Langford on last election day.  The defendant swore Sheriff Henry Catron from serving in the case.

Thirty-nine men went to Mt. Vernon in response to the summons, but it was decided even after that expense to postpone the trial.  They were allowed one day's pay and mileage, which ran from $4 to $4.60 each, the total amount being $169. The trustee of the jury fund gave Mr. S. H. Baughman, one of the number, a check for the amount and he paid them off at the Lincoln National on their return.

The remark referred to in our Mt. Vernon letter is said to have been that "the murder was a d--n cowardly one." [29]


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[September 30, 1898] -

As Mr. Will Hundley and his attorney, State Inspector Lester, were going toward Brush Creek last Tuesday to take measurements at the scene of the Lawrence killing on Brush Creek, they were met by an armed posse and ordered back to town after being subjected to the most abusive language. Messrs. Hundley and Lester were unarmed and upon their return were in less amiable humor than when they started.

The trial of ex-Sheriff Mullins for killing Henry Langford at Crooked Creek at the last November election was set for Thursday.  The attorneys for Mullins opposed having Sheriff Catron and his deputies serve hence others were chosen to serve during the trial.  Judge Lair and Supt. Davis were sent to Lincoln county to select a jury and returned with 39 of her substantial citizens.  All went well for a time, the prisoner was pleased with his jury and case was about to proceed when the sheriff made a remark, which Mullins' attorneys thought was meant to influence the jury against his client and he immediately resented it.  Things looked squally for a time, but Judge Morrow was equal to the occasion, the trial was postponed and the jurymen returned home." [30]

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[January 6, 1899] -

Payton Langford after suffering several months of consumption died last Friday morning. [31]



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[February 7, 1899] -

KILLING IN ROCKCASTLE.--Editor James Maret telephoned us this morning from Mt. Vernon that Elza Langford shot and killed William Hundley in Jop Langford's store on Brush creek yesterday afternoon. The Langfords had been at outs with Hundley since he killed John Lawrence some six months ago. It is claimed that Hundley fired first at Langford, who has not yet been arrested. Pate and Elza Langford were out on bail for killing Jailer C. L. King and Hundley, who was tried last week for killing Lawrence, had a hung jury. [32]


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[February 10, 1899] -

You have noted the killing of Will Hundley at Brush Creek by Elza Langford. Could the readers see this weirdly, picturesque point upon the K. C. Branch of the L. & N., they would not be surprised at the many tragedies connected with it. Hills loom skyward on each side of the treacherous creek which flows so placidly until swollen by the winter rains; opening to caves are seen in the hill sides from the station where the parties in ambush fired upon Hundley several months ago; large bowlders of the glacial period appear to be just ready to topple over the hillside to crush into the rustic residences of the thrifty natives. Two country stores supply the wants of farmers of the vicinity and here the news of the day is discussed. If the most sensational daily paper issued would send its ablest correspondent to this spot noted for tragedies, he could find material for pen pictures that would make him famous. He could here study the effects of heredity and moralize upon the civilizing effects of education. [33]



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[February 11, 1899] -

At Brush creek station, in Rockcastle county, Elza Langford instantly killed William Hundley. Hundley had killed John Lawrence, a friend of Langford's it is said. Bad blood has existed between them since Lawrence's death. [34]


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[February 14, 1899] -

Elza Langford was tried before Judge Williams Monday morning for the killing of William Hundley at Orlando, this county, last Monday. The evidence given showed that Hundley was the aggressor and met his death at the hands of the man he was trying to kill. Langford was acquitted. Langford's trial for the killing of ex-Jailer King is set for this term of circuit court which began its session today, Monday. [35]


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[February 17, 1899] -

At the time of her husband's death, Mrs. Hundley was at the home of Mrs. L. B. Adams and upon the latter devolved the trying ordeal of breaking the sad news to the bereaved wife. Her screams were heart rendering; she could scarcely realize that death had robber her of the handsome, devoted husband, who had left her side but a few hours before to attend to business at his old home on Brush Creek. Judge Williams accompanied Mrs. Hundley to the scene of the shooting to hold the examination. She took the remains to Clay county for interment. [36]


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[February 22, 1899] -


His Second Murder Trial.

MT. VERNON, Ky., Feb. 22.--Elsa Langford, who killed William Hundley two weeks ago, and was acquitted on the examining trial, is now on trial charged with killing ex-Jailer King, last year, while shooting at the Mullins faction. [37]


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[May 23, 1899] -

MT. VERNON.--A fairly good crowd was present at the opening of the May term of Rockcastle court yesterday. The jury was charged by Judge T. Z. Morrow and the rest of the day was taken up with the trial of whisky and pistol cases. The docket is a heavy one with several murder cases, including that of Sheriff Mullins, for killing Langford, which is the most important one. Hon. F. F. Bobbitt, of Crab Orchard, is among the visiting attorneys. [38]


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[May 30, 1899] -

The jury in the case of ex-Sheriff Mullins for killing Langford in Rockcastle was obtained out of the 50 men summoned from this county and are L. B. Nunnelley, W. G. McBee, Uriah Dunn, O. J. Crow, G. W. Carter, J. D. Dalton, J. H. Taylor, C. T. Owens, B. D. Carter, A. C. Alford, E. J. Tanner and J. S. Murphy. The testimony was concluded last night. The speaking begun this morning by Judge R. G. Williams for the defense. An acquittal is predicted. [39]



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[June 2, 1899] -

The jury in the case of ex-Sheriff Mullins for killing Henry Langford, was obtained out of the 50 men summoned from Lincoln county and are L. B. Nunnelley, W. G. MacBee, Uriah Dunn, O. J. Crow, G. W. Carter, J. D. Dalton, J. H. Taylor, C. T. Owens, B. D. Carter, A. C. Alford, E. J. Tanner and J. S. Murphy. The testimony was concluded Monday afternoon and the case argued by the attorneys until Tuesday afternoon when it was given to the jury. The attorneys for the prosecution were J. N. Sharp, P. D. Colyer, F. F. Bobbitt and W. A. Morrow. The defense was represented by Judge McClure, John W. Brown, Hon. R. c. Warren, of Stanford; C. W. Lester, of Williamsburg; C. C. and Judge Williams. Sharp, Morrow and Bobbitt argued the case before the jury for prosecution and the defense was looked after by Lester, C. C. and Judge Williams. There were a number of good speeches but that of Judge Williams was especially complimented.
Later: The result of the trial was a hung jury -- 9 for acquittal and 3 for two years. [40]


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[September 21, 1900] -

The cases against Elza Langford and W. G. Mullins each charged with murder, were all filed away; [41]



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[September 21, 1900] -

Circuit court is in session here, but owing to the non-appearance of the business manager of the "cheapest and best" things don't look natural.  Business is moving along and Judge Morrow looks better than we have seen him for some time.  The case of State against W. G. Mullins, charged with killing Henry Langford, and that against Elza Langford, charged with killing L. C. King, which have been on the docket for a great while, resulting several times in hung juries, were dismissed, it having been demonstrated that a conviction could not be reached in either case. [42]


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[1] "Three Killed." Morning Herald, Lexington, KY. November 3, 1897. Page 2. Genealogybank.com.

[2] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 5, 1897. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1897-11-05/ed-1/seq-1/

[3] Excerpt from "Additional Local." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 5, 1897. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1897-11-05/ed-1/seq-2/

[4] "Sheriff in Jail." Morning Herald, Lexington, KY. November 6, 1897. Page 4. Genealogybank.com.

[5] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 12, 1897. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1897-11-12/ed-1/seq-1/

[6] Excerpt from "Vicinity News." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 11, 1898. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-01-11/ed-1/seq-4/

[7] "Deadly Duel." Morning Herald, Lexington, KY. January 11, 1898. Page 4. Genealogybank.com.

[8] "Shooting at Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 11, 1898. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-01-11/ed-1/seq-3/

[9] "Kentucky Fued." Grand Forks Daily Herald, Grand Forks, ND. January 11, 1898. Page 1. Genealogybank.com.

[10] "Local and Otherwise." Mount Vernon Signal, Mt. Vernon, KY. January 21, 1898. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069561/1898-01-21/ed-1/seq-3/

[11] Excerpt from "Livingston." Mount Vernon Signal, Mt. Vernon, KY. January 21, 1898. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069561/1898-01-21/ed-1/seq-2/

[12] Excerpt from "Neighboring County News." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 28, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-01-28/ed-1/seq-1/

[13] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 8, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-02-08/ed-1/seq-1/

[14] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 25, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-02-25/ed-1/seq-1/

[15] Excerpt for "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 4, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-03-04/ed-1/seq-1/

[16] "Shot From Ambush." Daily Public Ledger, Maysville, KY. March 29, 1898. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069117/1898-03-29/ed-1/seq-4/

[17] Mount Vernon Signal, Mt. Vernon, KY. April 1, 1898. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069561/1898-04-01/ed-1/seq-3/

[18] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 5, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-04-05/ed-1/seq-1/

[19] "Dead." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 8, 1898. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-04-08/ed-1/seq-3/

[20] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 15, 1898. Page 6. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-04-15/ed-1/seq-6/

[21] "Without Bail." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 15, 1898. Page 5. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-04-15/ed-1/seq-5/

[22] Excerpts from "Kentucky Newslets." The Spout Spring Times, Spout Springs, KY. April 23, 1898. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88061168/1898-04-23/ed-1/seq-4/

[23] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 27, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-05-27/ed-1/seq-1/

[24] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 3, 1898. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-06-03/ed-1/seq-1/

[25] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 10, 1898. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-06-10/ed-1/seq-2/

[26] Excerpt "Local and Otherwise." Mount Vernon Signal, Mt. Vernon, KY. June 10, 1898. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069561/1898-06-10/ed-1/seq-3/

[27] Excerpt from "Local Happenings." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 14, 1898. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-06-14/ed-1/seq-3/

[28] Excerpt from "Circuit Court." Mount Vernon Signal, Mt. Vernon, KY. September 23, 1898. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069561/1898-09-23/ed-1/seq-3/

[29] Excerpt from "Local Happenings." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 30, 1898. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-09-30/ed-1/seq-3/

[30] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 30, 1898. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1898-09-30/ed-1/seq-4/

[31] Excerpt from "Local and Otherwise." Mount Vernon Signal, Mt. Vernon, KY. January 6, 1899. Page 5. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069561/1899-01-06/ed-1/seq-5/

[32] Excerpt from "Local Happenings." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 7, 1899. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1899-02-07/ed-1/seq-3/

[33] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 10, 1899. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1899-02-10/ed-1/seq-1/

[34] Excerpt from "Correspondence." The Spout Spring Times, Spout Springs, KY. February 11, 1899. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn88061168/1899-02-11/ed-1/seq-2/


[35] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 14, 1899. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1899-02-14/ed-1/seq-4/

[36] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 17, 1899. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1899-02-17/ed-1/seq-1/


[37] "His Second Murder Trial." Daily Public Ledger, Maysville, KY. February 22, 1899. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069117/1899-02-22/ed-1/seq-2/

[38] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 23, 1899. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1899-05-23/ed-1/seq-3/

[39] Excerpt from "Local Happenings." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 30, 1899. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1899-05-30/ed-1/seq-3/

[40] Excerpt from "Local and Otherwise." Mount Vernon Signal, Mt. Vernon, KY. June 2, 1899. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069561/1899-06-02/ed-1/seq-3/

[41] Excerpt from "Circuit Court." Mount Vernon Signal, Mt. Vernon, KY. September 21, 1900. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069561/1900-09-21/ed-1/seq-3/

[42] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 21, 1900. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1900-09-21/ed-1/seq-1/

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