May 1, 2015

Various Non-Fatal Shootings, Affrays, and Other Criminal Incidents, P/R/L, 1870s

Previously:

Click here for a list of my other Pulaski/Rockcastle/Laurel County KY articles

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The clippings below are non-fatal incidents (as far as I know) that reportedly took place in either Pulaski, Rockcastle, or Laurel county. I've clipped all these over time because I've found it to be a helpful research aid so I don't have to backtrack if I later come across an article that says, for example, someone died of a gunshot wound. I know it's not the most efficient way to do things, but it works for me.

In keeping with other posts on this blog, I'm going to organize these by decade. This list/collection is hardly comprehensive and is a work in progress. I plan to continue to update these posts as if they were still just the file on my harddrive, except now they're public. This means that future updates will only be denoted by a change of date on the next line. 

Last updated: 10/10/2016

See also:
Various Non-Fatal Shootings, Affrays, and Other Criminal Incidents, P/R/L, 1870s


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"Shooting." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 15, 1872. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1872-03-15/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN][March 15, 1872] -


Shooting.

Mr. Carrol Humber, a young man of Crab Orchard, Kentucky, shot Wm. G. Collier who lives near that place, on Monday last. Several shots were fired, two of which took effect, one in the arm and the other near the neck. The wounds are very slight, as Mr. Collier is out and attending to business. The difficulty grew out of some private misunderstanding. An examining trial will be held in a few days.




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Excerpt from "Petitions for Pardons." List of Pardons Granted by Governor Luke P. Blackburn, from September 3, 1879 to March 23, 1881. Kentucky Legislative Documents, Volumes 2 and 3. Page 549. Googlebooks.

[LINCOLN][March 1, 1881] -

Pardon No. 826.

The Commonwealth of Kentucky against Carroll K. Hamber.

The grand jury of Lincoln county, in the name and by the authority of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, accuse Carroll K. Hamber of the crime of malicious shooting and wounding with the intent to kill.

Committed as follows, viz: The said Carroll K. Hamber did, on the 11th day of March, 1872, in the county aforesaid, unlawfully, willfully, maliciously, and feloniously shoot at and wound with intent to kill, one W. G. Collier, with a pistol loaded with powder and ball, of which said wounding the said Collier, then and there did not die; against the peace and dignity of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

M. H. Owsley, Attorney for the Commonwealth.

The following indorsement appears on the indictment: No. 16, a true bill, H. Roberts, foreman, April 19th, 1872, filed.

W. H. Miller, Clerk.

Lincoln Circuit Court, October term, 1873.

Commonwealth of Kentucky, Plaintiff, vs. C. K. Hamber, Defendant.

“Ordered that these prosecutions be filed away, with leave reserved to the Commonwealth’s Attorney to have them reinstated upon this cout docket.

The following is the indorsement on the bench warrant:

“The defendant may give bail in the sum of one hundred dollars, and if he desires to give such bail, it may be taken by the Sheriff of the county in which he is arrested, or by the Sheriff of Lincoln county.

W.H. Miller, Clerk L. C.
By w. E. Varnon, D. C.

I, James P. Bailey, Clerk of the Lincoln Circuit Court, do certify the foregoing to be a true copy of the records I found in my office in the above styled case; and the order filing away is the last order in said case.

Attest:  J. P. Bailey, Clerk Lincoln Circuit Court.

To his Excellency, Gov. James B. Cantrill:

Your petitioners respectfully represent that in 1872, at the April term of the Lincoln Circuit Court, Carroll K. Hamber was indicted for maliciously wounding one Wm. Collier, in this, Lincoln county; that at the October term, 1873, the said indictment was filed away with leave to reinstate; that the said C. K. Hamber, in pursuance of an intention sustained and declared long before, went to Missouri in 1872, where he has ever since lived. Certain persons, for sinister purposes, are now endeavoring to have said indictment reinstated, and a requisition issued to bring said Hamber pack to trial, or rather to bring him back, and subject him to a harassing suit for damages. The man Collier was not seriously injured, and we know no public good to be subserved by disinterring an old case of this kind, which has long since ceased to be generally remembered.

We respectfully ask your Excellency to grant the said C. K. Hamber a pardon for the said alleged offense.

(list of names signing pardon, see link in citation for list)

I am familiar with some of the facts and circumstances connected with this case, and the immediate inducement to the difficulty in which Collier was wounded, and i think it is a case that justifies Executive clemency.


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Excerpt from "From Somerset." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 7, 1872. Page 3. LOC.  http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1872-06-07/ed-1/seq-3/

[PULASKI] [June 7, 1872] -


AN AFFRAY.

During the ceremonies of decoration day, and near the immense crowd assembled, three men by the name of Burton made an attack upon a man by the name of Muse, the latter in self-defense cutting one of the Burtons with a knife, when a brother of the wounded man struck Muse with a rock, shattering his cheek bone, which settled the difficulty, the gallant Burtons taking to their heels and Muse going for the doctor. 




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Excerpt from "From Mount Vernon." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 3, 1873. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1873-01-03/ed-1/seq-3/

[ROCKCASTLE] [January 3, 1873] -

DIFFICULTY.

A difficulty occurred on the evening of Christmas day, between Wm. Cook and V. Shilpot, at Gresham & Ward's store, over a bottle of brandy. Cook shot at Shilpot, but missed him and hit Thos. Miller, inflicting an ugly wound. The ball was extracted by Dr. Brown, who thinks the wound not dangerous. No arrests.



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Excerpt from "Pulaski Column." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 9, 1873. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1873-05-09/ed-1/seq-3/

[PULASKI] [May 9, 1873] -


In the evening after the voting was about over a spirited debate arose upon the streets between two colored divines which attracted a large crowd composed of both white and black, who were laughing heartily and enjoying the fun until some mischievous fellow threw a large sized fire-cracker into the crowd which exploded dispersing them in double quick, presenting one of the most ludicrous scenes we ever witnessed.




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Excerpt from "Pulaski Column." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 2, 1874. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1874-01-02/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [January 2, 1874] -


HIGHWAY ROBBERY.

On Saturday night the 13th inst., while James L. Colyer was returning to his home in the upper part of our county, from Mount Vernon, was attacked by four men in disguise coming from the bushes on the side of the public road with drawn weapons, who stopped his horse and first demanded his arms, Colyer, although a brave man, seeing that he was overpowered gave up his pistol which was returned to him after the robbers had drawn their loads; they then demanded his money which they got, amounting to the sum of $100, and also his watch, which they examined and threw against a tree, it being of small value.

Mr. Colyer has been for some time past a deputy Sheriff of our county, is a clever gentleman and makes a clever and vigilant officer.



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Excerpt from "Pulaski County Department." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 1, 1874. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1874-05-01/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [May 1, 1874] -


Prisoner Shot.

On Tuesday last, John Meece came to our town and obtained a warrant against Green Riley Dykes for making an attempt to shoot him. The warrant was placed in the hands of one of our officers, who summoned a posse to assist him in making the arrest, who, it seems, were accompanied by Meece. The arresting party repared to the house of Dykes, who surrendered without any resistance, but afterwards, perceiving Meece to be in the crowd, he became enraged and made some warlike demonstrations toward him, when Meece drew a favorite little companion in the shape of a pistol and shot the said Dykes; the ball penetrating the forehead, ranging around the head and lodging between the bones. The physician who attended Dykes pronounced the wound a serious but not a mortal one. The ball has not yet been extracted.



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Column 3. The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 8, 1874. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1874-05-08/ed-1/seq-3/

[ROCKCASTLE] [May 8, 1874] -


One of the prisoners, Wm. Johnson, colored, was sent for a term of fifteen years on three indictments, viz: horse-stealing, burning the Mt. Vernon jail, and assaulting and attempting to kill the jailor.




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Excerpt from "Pulaski County Department." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 10, 1874. Page 3. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1874-07-10/ed-1/seq-3/

[PULASKI] [July 10, 1874] -


Shooting with Intent to Kill.

Riley Tarter, accused of the crime of shooting and wounding Perkins Baker with intent to kill, had his examining trial a few days since, before Judges Zachary and DeHoff, who sent him on to further trial, fixing his bail at the sum of $500.

It is supposed that Baker will recover, although his wound is a serious one; several of the shot taking effect in his right eye.



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Excerpt from "Pulaski Department" The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 17, 1874. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1874-07-17/ed-1/seq-3/

[PULASKI] [July 17, 1874] -


Highway Robbery.

On last Tuesday evening, a little while after dark, a man by the name of Hill was attacked by unknown parties, about two miles from our town near the railroad line, knocked down with a club or rock, and while in a senseless condition was robbed of about $150--his hard earnings as a hand upon the road. His life was at first despaired of, but under good treatment and nursing it is now thought that he will recover.

A man whose name we cannot learn, was also knocked down upon our streets, a few nights since, at a late hour, for the purpose of robbery by some midnight scoundrel.



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Excerpt from "Pulaski County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 9, 1874. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1874-10-09/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [October 9, 1874] -


One Irwin Taylor shot and wounded David Bails, a few days since, in the vicinity of Point Isabel, with intent to kill, for which crime he is indicted.



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Excerpt from "Home Jottings." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 5, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-03-05/ed-1/seq-3/

[PULASKI] [March 5, 1875] -


CUTTING AFFRAY.-- Mr. Berry Ware, an old citizen living in Pulaski Co., was seriously stabbed by his son-in-law, Josiah Bishop, on Friday last. It seems that Bishop had taken one of Mr. Ware's horses without his consent, and ridden off some distance. On his return, Mr. Ware remonstrated with him on such conduct, when a rough and tumble fight ensued, Ware getting the better of the young man. It was while Ware had him down that Bishop did the cutting--reaching over and inflicting seven severe wounds in his back.






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Excerpt from "Letter from Somerset." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 9, 1875. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-04-09/ed-1/seq-1/

[PULASKI] [April 9, 1875] -


On Monday, the first day of the Circuit Court, while our marshal was attempting to persuade a lot of drunken rowdies to leave town without further disturbance, one of them drew a pistol and fired at him. This caused the others to desire a chance to show off "blood" that was in them, and the whole of them began firing at the officer, who, as he called for help, attempted to discharge his pistol at one or two of them, but did not succeed. He was quickly reinforced by some of our old and best citizens. After twenty-five shots and one or two foot races, some of the law and peace breakers were jugged, the others escaping to their hiding places. It is something remarkable that so many shots were aimed at Major Elliot, the  marshal, and still he passed through all with scarcely  a scratch. He proved, however, that he would stand fire, though he was himself virtually unarmed. Only one or two persons were injured during the affray, and they very slightly.


During the night following the difficulty the men escaped from the jail by crawling out through "Leon's Tunnel" (hole in the wall.)

We are glad to know that this difficulty has awakened our people to a sense of the condition to which our town is being brought by a set of men (?) who seem determined to follow this hell-born vocation, bid defiance to all law, and not once consider the welfare, peace or happiness of their fellow creatures.



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Excerpt from "Pulaski County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 6, 1875. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-06-04/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [June 6, 1875] -


PULASKI COUNTY NEWS.

Somerset.

A difficulty has been on hands for some days between some hands on the road four miles of this place, which was likely to have resulted in bloodshed. It appears that a father and his two sons, from some cause or other, had armed themselves and taken position on the road intending to murder a young man named W. W. Sadler, or drive him off the road. But it [....] drive well for on meeting them with leveled guns and warnings that he must leave, he asked them to await his return. He procured a shot gun, and amidst the cries of women and children that "Go back, John is so bad," he charged down the line until he captured his former position on the work. Here the difficulty was stopped by a peace warrant issued at the instance of Mr. Bowyer. []


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Excerpt from "Home Jottings." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 2, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-07-02/ed-1/seq-3/

[ROCKCASTLE?][July 2, 1875] -

SHOOTING AFFAIR. -- We learn from passengers on yesterday morning's train from Livingston; that a serious affray took place yesterday between Wm. R. Dillion and Ben. Goodin and his son, which resulted in the wounding of Goodin's son, by a pistol shot, and the wounding also, of W. R. Dillion, slightly. The difficulty grew out of an attachment suit brought by Goodin against Dillion. []



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Excerpt from "Pulaski County News -- Cato." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 2, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-07-02/ed-1/seq-3/

[PULASKI] [July 2, 1875] -

A row occurred a few days ago, in the ale saloon kept by Jno. Hubble, at this place, in which Hubble is said to have paddled his man severely--who was drunk. Would it not be advisable for Squire Graves to enquire into the offense? []



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Excerpt from "Pulaski County News -- Somerset." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 6, 1875. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-08-06/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI][August 6, 1875] -

A negro was brought before the Police Court on Thursday, charged with shooting with intent to kill. It was proven that he shot at a small negro boy on the day of the election because the boy laughed at him. He went back to jail. 


The election passed off quietly, except one or two wordy broils. Two men named Tuttle and Hartgrove, came near fighting, but were prevented by the Police. A young fellow, Silas Denham, drew a pistol and amused himself by firing a number of shots at the sidewalk. A lot of young scrubs who were drunk, remained until late in the evening, and attempted to get a "fuss." What are town laws for, if not to "jug" such fellows? The Republican ticket carried the county by about the usual majority. Selling whisky on the sly, elected A. M. Parsons to the Marshalship of our town, and Al did not sell the whisky either. []





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Excerpt from "Election Day." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 6, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-08-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN][August 6, 1875] -

Election Day.

August the second has come and gone. -- A very large crowd was in town all day, and what with the excitement of the election and a counter excitement produced by the imbibation of mean whisky freely dealt out by the friends of the various candidates, a considerable noise and shouting were indulged in, though no serious disturbance took place. A drunken individual, however, was so boisterous in his enthusiasm concerning his favorite candidate that an attempt was made by his friends to take him out of town, but some other of his friends, deemed the rights of a free citizen infringed upon by those bodily conveying him against his will, interfered, and for a time there was every indication of a pitched battle, but the coolness of Sheriff Withers and several other gentlemen of less excitable disposition, soon quieted the mob, and order again reigned in Warsaw, after a fashion.

A perfect Babel of confusion was kept up all day, and the amount of mean whisky drank was simply astonishing. Money was freely spent; and votes which went at the nominal price of twenty-five cents early in the day would have brought a much higher figure as the day advanced. We quote medium to choice 25c to $2.50.

That there was a vast amount of swapping indulged in there can be no doubt, and our State ticket was almost forgotten, while the little county races seemed to occupy the attention of all. []


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"Pulaski County News." http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-08-13/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI][August 13, 1875] -





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Excerpt from "Boyle County -- Danville." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 13, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-08-13/ed-1/seq-3/

[BOYLE][August 13, 1875] -

Since the election, Danville has been very quiet. For about two weeks the whole town and county was in a state of great excitement. The Radicals were sure of victory and the Democrats determined to put forth every exertion in order to come off victorious. A great deal of whisky was drank, and a large amount of money, we understand, was given for votes. But now, it is all forgotten and passed, and no one remembers any such things, especially about the whisky and money. The manner in which elections are conducted, is a disgrace to civilized communities. The day will be hailed with joy, when the candidates for offices will be elected by a sober and intelligent people.




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Excerpt from "Home Jottings." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 27, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-08-27/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [August 27, 1875] -



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Excerpt from "From Stanford to Somerset." http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-09-03/ed-1/seq-3/

[PULASKI] [September 3, 1875] -



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Excerpt from "Home Jottings." The Courier Journal, Stanford, KY. September 24, 1875. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-09-24/ed-1/seq-3/





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Excerpt from "Pulaski County News." http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-09-24/ed-1/seq-3/



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Excerpts from "Court Items." http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1875-10-29/ed-1/seq-3/




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Excerpt from "Home Jottings." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 11, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-02-11/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [February 11, 1876] -

Hiram Dudderar, who lives at Hall's Gap, on the Somerset pike, was alarmed last Tuesday night, by the firing of pistols in front of his house. It appeared that a young regiment had opened on it, for the house was riddled with bullets, and the windows shot and knocked to splinters. We have not learned who was suspected of the deed. Whoever it was, deserves the severest punishment. Whatever may have been the exciting cause, it did not furnish grounds for the cowardly deed, as the Courts are open for the redress of all real or supposed grievances. Dudderar, with his wife and children, were in the house, it is said, and the wonder is that some of them were not wounded or killed. There was certainly an attempt to do one, or both which makes the assault all the more criminal. The good name which the counties of Lincoln, and a few others in Central Kentucky, have always maintained, should not be tarnished at this late day. The foregoing disturbance, like four-fifths of all similar affairs, doubtless had its origin in a whisky bottle. []



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Excerpt from "Home Jottings." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 3, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-03-03/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [March 3, 1876] -

We learn that Sim. H. Bryant shot at John Stephenson in Crab Orchard last Saturday, but missed him. The difficulty arose out of an old quarrel. Stephenson, some years ago, shot at and wounded Bryant pretty severely, and they have never made friends since.


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Excerpt from "Pulaski County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 21, 1876. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-07-21/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [July 21, 1876] -

Mr. Turpin, who was struck on the head by his cousin, during a drunken brawl, last week, and received a fracture of the skull, has been near the point of death all the week. The Doctors reported his case now as improving, with a fair prospect of his recovery. 





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Excerpt from "Pulaski County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 4, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-08-04/ed-1/seq-3/

[PULASKI] [August 4, 1876] -


HAMBURG--ANOTHER NEGRO SHOT AT--TROOPS NEEDED IN SOMERSET.-- The above is the way the following item will be headed by the time it reaches the Cincinnati Gazette. Old man Reed, a clever blacksmith, resided in town, having learned from his daughter that a negro man had addressed an insulting letter to hear, sallied forth on Monday morning last, to wreak his vengeance on him. Coming up on the object of his search on Main street, he accosted him, and, after a few angry words had passed, proceeded with a stick to convince the would-be miscegenator, that there would never be enough amendments added to the Constitution to admit a negro's familiarity with his family. During the performance, the negro either drew, or let fall from his person, a pistol, which the irate Reed promptly seized and emptied the contents of a barrel in it, as the negro disappeared behind a neighboring corner. About this time Reed, fils [son], came up, and wrenching the pistol from pere [father], commenced firing at long range at the hill that the negro had gone behind. The hullaballoo finally brought the Marshal and Jailer to the scene, who took in the situation at a glance. Hastily bestriding a mule apiece, they began reconnoitering in the direction of the flying negro, and, after considerable skirmishing and bushwhacking, at last succeeded in capturing him. He was tried before a Justice for carrying concealed weapons, and, in default of $100 bail, went to meet Cosgrove. 

[Cosgrove was another man already in the jail for an unrelated offense; he was mentioned in an article above this one.]





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Excerpt from "Pulaski County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 11, 1876. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-08-11/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [August 11, 1876] -


Somerset.
If there is a town of its size in the State that can get up more excitement over a petty election than Somerset, we would like to hear from it. Monday, a Sheriff, a Constable and a town Marshal were elected, and the usual amount of whisky, quarreling and shooting was indulged in.



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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 11, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-08-11/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [August 11, 1876] -


Jerry Withers, of color, wounding by cutting, with intent to kill, another colored man--held to answer in the sum of $200. Alfred McAlister, of color, same charge--dismissed. 




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Local News. The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 8, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-09-08/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN?] [September 8, 1876] -


A personal difficulty occurred in this county a few days ago on Dix River, between two men named Spratt and Sudduth. The facts as we learn them, were, that Frank Spratt rode up to the house of "Unk" Sudduth, in disguise, called him out and told him he intended to shoot him. Whereupon, the man Spratt, shot at Sudduth, but did not hit him. After that, Sudduth went into his house and came out with a shot gun and fired at Spratt, without effect. Spratt rode off and Sudduth and his son started after him. Soon after this, Spratt passed the road where Sudduth and his son were waiting for him. The son of Sudduth fired on Spratt with a pistol, and shot him in the face. After this, Spratt returned the fire and shot young Sudduth in the hip with a pistol. Neither of the men was seriously injured, although the wounds inflicted are painful. The cause of the whole trouble, was, that Spratt thought that Sudduth had induced his (Sudduth's) son, to indict him in the Garrard Circuit Court. We presume that on a full investigation of the difficulty, the facts will be brought out, and after that, the guilty parties, whoever they may be, will be compelled to answer for their misdeeds. []



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Excerpt from "Pulaski County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 15, 1876. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-09-15/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [September 15, 1876] -

SOME LITTLE SHOOTING.-- It is not often that we can report all quiet along the C. S. R. R. line, for scarcely a day passes that some one is not killed or wounded. For the two or three days, ending with tonight, we have the following report: Pat Hogan, a discharged foreman from Flannery's work, went to that delectable resort known as the Willow Tree, which is situated near Stone & Co.'s work, and imbibed rather freely. After getting on a tolerably full load, he commenced to make himself disagreeable to some parties who were in the saloon at the time. The bar-keeper asked him to desist, when they playfully got into a scuffle--Hogan throwing the barkeeper, McGraw, down. This enraged McGraw, who drew a pistol and shot Hogan through the heart, causing his death immediately. On Rodemer's work, a white man "lit" into another white man, with a musket, and gave him forty-six shots in his side. One of Mr. Flannery's foreman discharged a negro, who became so insulted that he walked to his shanty, got a musket, and deliberately s hot at the foreman, a few shots taking effect. The scamp then threw down his weapon and fled. On Section 82, two negroes got into a fight, one used an axe, the other a small pistol. Result--a heavy lick with the axe for one, and four pistol balls in the hide of the other. The latter was not seriously hurt, and the balls hanging from his tough skin, partially imbedded, presented the appearance of huge dry ticks that had been on duty some time. At Smith's, the battle was also between two negroes. They had a little misunderstanding, and one of them, smarting under the effects of it, loaded his pistol, came upon his enemy when he least expected it, and gave him a fearful wound. In all these cases there has been but one arrest, that on Rodemer's work. The shootist claiming that the man shot was not the man he intended to shoot, and the man shot said he wasn't after the shootist at all, but another man, the case was dismissed. The negroes are daily becoming more civilized in their use of weapons, for, until a short time past, razors were their principal arms; now, a negro here does not consider himself anything unless he is the possessor of a pistol or old army musket. To this state of affairs there ought to be put a stop by the authorities, else no one can feel himself in the least safe in this community. Please see to it, ye law-enforcers!



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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 29, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-09-29/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN?] [September 29, 1876] -

Andy Yates, of color, is rapidly gaining the unenviable character of an old offender. A few days since he and his brother-in-law, Henry James, got, into a difficulty at a house occupied by some colored people in the lower part of town, and the brother-in-law got the better of that difficulty, whereupon Andy came up town and procured a pistol, with which he returned to the seat of war. Reaching that point, he fired it through the window at Henry James, and, missing his game, the ball entered his mother's thigh, inflicting a slight wound. Marshal Stagg then took the warrior under arrest for trial, which resulted in a fine of $20 and costs. Andy, being unable to meet this modest demand by the Commonwealth, was sent to jail, where he will rest from his labors, at the usual allowance, until the majesty of an insulted law is fully vindicated. []





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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 6, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-10-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [October 6, 1876] -


There was a shooting scrape at Crab Orchard last week between Grove Kennedy and another man, in which neither was hit, but a shot struck a bystander in the head, inflicting a slight wound. Kennedy and the other man fired five or six times each across a store room, but strange to say either shot took effect. An overcoat hanging at the side of a door had a number of bullet holes in it. []




---

Excerpt from "Kentucky News." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. October 7, 1876. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

[LINCOLN] [October 7, 1876] -


Two men took six shots at each other in a store at Crab Orchard, the other day. Results: Lock of hair gone from the head of a looker-on, and several holes in an innocent overcoat hanging on the wall. []





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Excerpts from "Hustonville." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 24, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-11-24/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [November 24, 1876] -


Hustonville.

November 21, 1876.

There seems to be a turbulent spirit abroad in our usually quiet region. Last Saturday night, one Brad Henson and Alfred Russell, son of M. T. Russell, had a difficulty in Milledgeville, in which young R. was dangerously stabbed just above the collar bone. Dr. H. Brown is attending on the case, and evidently considers it serious. Henson is thought to have left the neighborhood.

Last evening, there was an affray at Jasper's store, about four miles from this place, on the Liberty road. The parties engaged were Wm. Cloyd and --- Floyd. They differed in reference to a claim held by F. against C., and after considerable altercation, the former drew a knife and inflicted several wounds, we understand, on his adversary. Dr. Brown, who has charge of this case also, reports the damage serious but not dangerous. []


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Excerpt from "Lincoln County News - Hustonville." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 8, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-12-08/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [December 8, 1876] -

In 'Squire Brown's court, to-day, the case of Floyd, charged with an assault on Wm. Cloyd, came up. Floyd waived an examination and entered into bond to answer at the next term of the Circuit Court. []



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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 1, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-12-01/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [December 1, 1876] -


The trial of David Swope, charged with shooting and wounding, with intent to kill, a negro man, was postponed from last Saturday until next Tuesday. His son, A. M. Swope, Esq., will be here to assist in his defense. 


---

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 8, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-12-08/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [December 8, 1876] -

The examining trial of David Swope, charged with shooting the negro man Dudley, was held last Tuesday before Esquires Carson and Hughes. The evidence developed the facts that Dudley had, previous to the day of the shooting, and on several occasions, made threats and demonstrations of violence toward Mr. Swope and his family, and one day tried to borrow a gun to take with him to the corn field on Swope's farm, where he had raised a crop of grain this year, on shares with Swope, declaring his intention to get more corn than Swope thought he was entitled to, at all hazards. From the facts proven by both black and white witnesses, the court could do nothing but find that there were no grounds for holding the defendant over for further trial, and he was therefore discharged. []



---

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 15, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-12-15/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [December 15, 1876] -

The negro man Dudley, who was shot by Mr. David Swope, is almost well, and the loss of an eye is all he will suffer. He is now going about. []



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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 8, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-12-08/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [December 8, 1876] -

Roye Beazley, a young man from Garrard county, came over here [Lincoln] last Monday and indulged freely in liquor, which gave him an appetite for blood. Meeting a negro man in the road near Richmond Junction the two got into a sudden and foolish quarrel, during which profane and rought talk was used by both, whereupon Beazley drew a revolver and shot the negro, John Wallace, twice -- once int he arm and once in the leg. The wounds are quite painful but not dangerous. Beazley was arrested and put in jail over night, but his relatives came over from Garrard the next day and bailed him out, he having waived an examining trial. His bail was fixed at $800 for his appearance at the next April term of the Lincoln Circuit Court. []



---

Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 15, 1876. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-12-15/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [December 15, 1876] -

The negro man, John Wallace, who was shot by young Roy Beazley, a short time since, is rapidly recovering. []





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Excerpt from "Some Pulaski County Items." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 21, 1876. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-12-21/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [December 21, 1876] -

SHOOTING--IRISHMAN SHOT.-- Tom Jeffreys, who keeps a drinking saloon on Section 85, was awakened one night last week by a couple of drunken Irishmen, who wanted to come in and replenish the dying spirits within them. The hour being very late, Jeffrey refused to get up and admit them, whereupon they proceeded with a fence rail to knock the door down. As they were battering against it, Jeffreys put his pistol through a crack in the house and fired, the load taking effect in the abdomen of one of the intruders, producing a wound that will probably prove fatal. []




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Excerpt from "Some Pulaski County Items." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 21, 1876. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1876-12-21/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [December 21, 1876] -

SHOOTING--NEGRO SHOT-- P. F. Smith, contractor for the railroad work just below town, attempted one of the cold mornings of last week to make his hands go to work. All went except one, who became very insolent, and finally threw a rock at Smith, knocking his hat off. Smith then drew his pistol and fired at the scoundrel twice, both shots striking him, one in the arm, the other in the back. Both being flesh wounds, the negro was not badly hurt; but remained around the shanties of Smith, swearing vengeance on him and threatening to burn his store and house. Hearing of these threats, Smith loaded up his double-barreled gun with the intention of putting the negro beyond the power to execute his threats, but on a second thought, he decided to get out a peace warrant against him, and on the trial of it, the negro was sent to jail, in default of security to keep the peace. []




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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 19, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-01-19/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [January 19, 1877] -

Andy Yates, an incorrigible and pugnacious colored individual, was tried before his Honor, Judge Lytle, Wednesday evening, on an indictment for shooting with intent to kill, one Henry James. The case was very ably argued pro and con, by Fontaine T. Fox Bobbitt and Judge Phillips, and was dismissed. Andy has been in jail nearly a month. []



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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  March 16, 1877. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-03-16/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [March 16, 1877] -

They have high old times down at the River (Livingston) occasionally. Reports of an affray there on Sunday, in which knives and pistols were freely used, and resulted in the wounding of several parties, have reached us, but they are not sufficiently authentic to warrant our giving the details. The matter will be judicially investigated. []



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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 30, 1877. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-03-30/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [March 30, 1877] -

Lizzie Owens, who was tried in an examining Court last week, for maliciously shooting and wounding Lou Mullins, was held over to answer at the Circuit Court, and in default of a $200 bond, went to jail.


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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 18, 1877. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-05-18/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [May 18, 1877] -


Lizzie Owens, who was indicted at the last term of our Circuit Court for maliciously shooting and wounding Lou. Mullins, and who forfeited a $200 bond by failing to appear for trial, was arrested on Monday, by her surety, W. M. Mullins, brought to town and lodged in jail.




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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 6, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-04-06/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [April 6, 1877] -

SHOT. -- As Tim Dudderar, son of James J. Dudderar, was returning from school here Wednesday night to his home in the country, some unknown scoundrel ordered him to halt. He did so and threw up his hands, when he was fired at, the ball taking effect in his hand and ranging downward, lodged in his wrist. Dudderar has no idea who the would be assassin is, as he ran off as soon as he fired and he did not feel in humor to follow him. []




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Excerpt from "Lincoln County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  April 13, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-04-13/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN / CASEY] [April 13, 1877] -

There is a report current that on Friday last, a party of five white men pursued a negro charged with theft near this place, to a house in Casey, called him out and shot him, leaving him dangerously wounded. Another statement is that he had been arrested, and was shot in attempting to escape. []



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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 20, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-04-20/ed-1/seq-3/

[ROCKCASTLE] [April 20, 1877] -



One man was drowned and another was shot at the River last week. It is impossible for us to get any details of events which occur down there. The man who was drowned, was an Italian. His body has not been recovered. []






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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 11, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-05-11/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [May 11, 1877] -

Henry Alford, a colored boy, was arrested and lodged in jail this week, charged with "shooting at with intent to kill or wound" another negro who had possession of his watch. Henry will likely have a hard time of it. []



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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 11, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-05-11/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [May 11, 1877] -


AN OUTRAGE -- The facts concerning the recent row near Crab Orchard, is as near as we could ascertain them, about as follows: Last Saturday, G. W. Lingenfelter, a hale old man of 60, who lives in two miles of Crab Orchard, on the Mt. Vernon road, has occasion to go to the former place. Finishing his business, he started back home in the afternoon in a wagon, and when about a mile from town, he was waylaid by Henry and John Watts, a couple of young men, with their uncle Granville Watts, it is said, at a safe distance as Generalisimo. One of the Watts' struck Lingenfelter over the head with a gun, breaking the gun and felling the old man senseless to the pike. The other Watts cried out, "shoot the d--d scoundrel, he is only possuming." This aroused Lingenfelter, who staggered to his feet, seized a wagon standard, turned upon his assailants, and drove them from the field, capturing the broken gun. During the melee, seven shots were fired at him, with pistols, but without effect. The Watts' retired to Mt. Vernon, and fortified, from which point they telegraphed on Sunday, to know if Lingenfelter was dead. Mr. L is not hurt much, the blow with the gun having glanced from his head to the shoulder. The Watts gave as a reason for the attack, that Lingenfelter had set dogs on his hogs, but this the latter asserts was only a pretext. []



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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 18, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-05-18/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN][May 18, 1877] -


The Watts, who, it is charged, attempted to assassinate old man Linginfelter, near Crab Orchard, an account of which we gave last week, have been arrested, and held to bail in the sum of $400 a piece, to appear at the next Circuit Court. Mr. Linginfelter has brought suit against them, laying his damages at $5,000. []




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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 18, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-05-18/ed-1/seq-3/

[PULASKI] [May 18, 1877] -


MAN SHOT AND SERIOUSLY WOUNDED IN SOMERSET. -- A difficulty occurred in Somerset, on Tuesday evening, between Mr. Frank Vickery and Robert Nunnelly, in regard to some tanbark, which resulted in the former shooting the latter in the breast, inflicted, it is thought, a mortal wound. The shooting was regarded as so much an act of self-defence, that Mr. Vickery was not arrested.




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Excerpt from "Lincoln County News -- Hustonville." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 18, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-05-18/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN][May 18, 1877] -


There was an affray in the contraband quarter on Sunday night, between Henry Blain and Jerry Hughes, of the colored persuasion. Henry fired four shots, wounding Jerry in the leg. The "bone of contention" was a fair, but frail damsel of ebony finish, of whom the gentlemen--both married men--were enamored. Henry was arrested, but succeeded in escaping from his guards yesterday morning. It is generally regretted that Jerry's condition is not dangerous. 




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Excerpt from "Lincoln County News -- Hustonville." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 25, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-05-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN][May 25, 1877] -

Henry Blain had an examining trial before Esquires Brown and Compton, on Saturday, charged with a breach of the peace in shooting Jerry Hughes. He waived an examination and was held to bail in the amount of $50 to answer at the Circuit Court. Jerry has entirely recovered, and is busy in seeking to convict his colored brother of some crime--he don't care much what, if it will pay. []




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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 25, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-05-25/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN][May 25, 1877] -


NEGRO SHOT. -- A negro named White, while prowling around the establishment of George Farmer, another colored man, was heavily peppered with shot by the latter. The wounded man has since had to have his arm amputated, and Farmer has been arrested and lodged in jail. []





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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 1, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-06-01/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN][June 1, 1877] -

The first case before it was that of Armp Woods, colored, charged with cutting in sudden heat and passion another "cullud gemmen" named Bill Jones. After an able argument for the defendant by Mr. Rochester, the case was given to the jury, who rendered a verdict of acquittal. []



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Excerpt from "Local News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 15, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-06-15/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN][June 15, 1877] -

The negroes that tried to bulldoze Pete Hampton a year or so ago, with bad looking pistols, have been captured and are now serving out the fines and imprisonment assessed against them at the last Circuit Court. []




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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  June 29, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-06-29/ed-1/seq-3/

[ROCKCASTLE] [June 29, 1877] -


SHOOTING AFFRAY.-- On Friday last, 22d inst., about 6. A.M., a difficulty originated at this place, between C. Crooke and A. P. Rickets, both coal dealers, caused by Mr. Crooke obstructing a wagon road and a public passway, over which Mr. Rickets was hauling. A trestle work had been erected by Mr. C.  Mr. R. seeing that he was being cut off from all communications, consulted the legal authorities, and on being advised of his right to remove said obstructions, set to work cleaning out the road. Mr. C. not feeling disposed to stand by and see his newly erected works torn down, dispatched a man to his store for all the men and arms that could be had. Mr. R, hearing this order, did likewise, and the battle was soon in progress. Shooting on both sides was kept up for some time, but fortunately but one man was wounded. Those that were engaged on Crooke's side were C. Crooke, Champ Mullins, John Mullins, Wm. Mullins, Cal Mullins, J. D. Proctor, Rob't White, J. S. Calloway, A. Delph, Wm. Barger, L. W. Ham, W. L. Payne, June White, col'd, Robert Tinsley, col'd, Elbert Drake, col'd. Those on Ricket's side were A. P. Rickets, Wm. Taylor, Jesse Pitman. Mr. Rickets was the only man that fired a shot on his side. He surrounded the enemy and held them at bay for some time. Those that witnessed the fight say that fifty or more shots were fired. Wm. Barger was shot through the shoulder. Unfortunately for him he had strayed from his party some forty or fifty yards when he was shot, and not being thoughtful enough to get behind the stake pile. Mr. C. then gave orders that the white flag should be raised to bring in the wounded. All parties were arrested by the civil officers, and at the examining trial, C. Crooke, C. Mullins, J. Mullins, Wm. Mullins, J. D. Proctor, Rob't White and A. P. Rickets were held over in bond of $200 each to appear at the Fall term of the Rockcastle Circuit Court.

All is quiet now and business resumed. We hope to have something of more interest to record in our next communication. 




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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 10, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-08-10/ed-1/seq-3/

[ROCKCASTLE] [August 10, 1877] -


There were a few slight indications of a "row" here Monday evening, caused by a fellow named Miller, who struck a negro woman with his fist. He was promptly arrested, and almost as promptly discharged; why, we couldn't tell. 




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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 10, 1877. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-08-10/ed-1/seq-3/

[ROCKCASTLE] [August 10, 1877] -


A difficulty occurred at the River late Monday evening, between two men named Kilhoy and Marlow. Kilhoy knocked Marlow down three times in succession, kicking him with his boot-heel over the eye, lacerating the flesh considerably, and also in the breast, but doing him no serious damage. Whisky was the cause.




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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 14, 1877. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-09-14/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [September 14, 1877] -


DIFFICULTY.--We learn that a difficulty occurred about two miles from this place, at the residence of Mrs. Butcher, between two females who were old enough to have known better, which resulted in one of them, a blushing young widow, getting a pretty severe choking.




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added to timeline

Excerpt from "Pulaski County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 19, 1877. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-10-19/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [October 19, 1877] -

A man named Mincie and one named Simpson, got into a row at Pole Bridge Church on Sunday the 7th. Knives were the weapons used and Mincie was fatally wounded. 




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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 19, 1877. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-10-19/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [October 19, 1877] -

A fiendish attack was made by some ruffians on Robert Jones in the East end of the county one night last week, but we have not received the particulars. Some of the parties have been arrested, and we hope they will receive the punishment justly due them for their conduct. 



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Excerpt from "Pulaski County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 16, 1877. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-11-16/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [November 16, 1877] -

A Baptist meeting was broken up a Sunday or two ago at Juggernot, in this county, by three drunken roughs, named Lewis, Heath and Haynes, who went into the church with drawn pistols and ran the whole congregation home. The scoundrels have not been arrested, but if there was ever a case that Judge Lynch ought to attend to, it is this. 



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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 16, 1877. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-11-16/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [November 16, 1877] -

A young gentleman in town received yesterday morning an unique and interesting communication, post-marked at Pine Hill. The letter is without date, written in a delicate (?) feminine hand, and is as follows: "Mr. ---- : There is a call for you and your frens down hear at pine hil, as soon as yu can cum -- there is a woman at the section hous that is belo pine hil that has bin staing with a negro and has parted a man and his wife and I think that she oute to bee hung by youre party if they are a frens to pore heart-broken wimmin, for this woman that her husban has left is jest about crazy. You can fine this woman in the citchen of the section-hous -- she sleeps in the citchen. When eny boddy cums they can cum in and no boddy no it -- be sure and cum down won nite this week, and see this woman that has bin doing so much mischief. I don't no how to sine your name, so I wil not sine her name, but you can find her in the citchen, and hang her! hang her!" We publish the above as an evidence of the triteness of the adage: "Hell hath no greater fury than a woman scorned." The young gentleman desires us to say to his anonymous correspondent that he is not connected with any hanging [organizations], and hence he is compelled to decline rendering her the requested service.



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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 30, 1877. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-11-30/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [November 30, 1877] -

We published in this column a week or two since, a letter written from Pine Hill to a younger gentleman of this place, requesting him to bring "his men" down and hang "a woman who lived in the citchen at the Sexion hous near pine hil." An event which occurred at Pine Hill last Sunday, points to one Ellen Maguire, as the writer of the letter. We allude to the said Ellen Maguire's assault on the person of Nancy Mason, and mortally wounding her by a thrust from a bowie-knife in the left lung. The history of the sanguinary affair so far as we are able to get at the facts, is about as follows: A man named Cox has for several years past, been the lover of Ellen Maguire. The latter's maiden name was Mason, she having married a man named Maguire, who has since left her. Lately, Cox has been bestowing his smiles on Nancy Mason, and we presume, as a mere matter of course, has been guilty of neglect toward the fair Ellen. Either the neglect toward herself, or the smiles toward Nancy Mason, aroused the "green-eyed monster" in Ellen's ardent and impetuous nature. She doubtless nursed her injuries, and brooded over schemes for revenge. She first wrote the letter mentioned, but the "Ku Klux" not responding promptly, she took vengeance into her own hands. Last Sunday she armed herself with a bowie-knife and went to seek the truant, Cox. Her search was successful, for she found him in the woods, alone with her hated rival. Then the fury which had been pent up in her for days and days, burst forth in one wild torrent. She leaped upon her rival and struck her with the knife in the left breast, just below the shoulder blade, the point penetrating downward and thro the left lung. The second stroke was warded off by Cox, and Ellen cut her own arm quite severely. As she made the third stroke Cox caught the knife and his hand was fearfully cut as the mad woman jerked it from him. Having wounded all parties, herself included, Ellen left. Whither she has gone is not known. A warrant was issued for her arrest, but the Sheriff has failed to find her. Up to yesterday noon, the wounded woman was still living, though no hopes of her recovery are entertained. 



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Excerpt from "Pulaski County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 23, 1877. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-11-23/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [November 23, 1877] -


Silas Cundiff and John Burk quarreled over a game of croquet this week, when the former struck the latter with a mallet, fracturing his skull.




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Excerpt from "Pulaski County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. November 23, 1877. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-11-23/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [November 23, 1877] -

Mrs. Wilson, the wife of a wagoner has started a movement in Somerset that will prove more effective than either the Murphys or Good Templars. She goes in for the blood of naughty Saloon keepers and lays them up with broken skulls. James Whitehead, a bar-keeper, now lies in a dangerous condition, the result of one of her freaks.





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"Rockcastle County." The Louisville Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. November 27, 1877. Page 4. Newspapers.com.

[ROCKCASTLE] [November 27, 1877] -


ROCKCASTLE COUNTY.

A Jealous Woman Mortally Wounds Her Rival.

[Special Dispatch to the Courier-Journal.]

MT. VERNON, KY., Nov 26. -- Yesterday evening, at Pine Hill, in this county, a woman named Ellen Maguire stabbed and mortally wounded another woman named Nancy Mason. Jealousy is supposed to have been the case. A man named Cox, who has long been the paramore of Ellen Maguire, has lately transferred his affection to Nancy Mason. Yesterday, Ellen discovered Cox and her rival together in the woods, attacked the latter with a large knife. She struck her in the left lung, and her victim is slowly bleeding to death. In the encounter Cox was wounded in the hand, and Ellen cut her own arm quite severely. A warrant was issued for Ellen to-day. 


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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 28, 1877. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-12-28/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [December 28, 1877] -

They seem to have had rather lively times at Livingston, Tuesday night. A grand Christmas frolic, in which clubs, knives and pistols played important parts, was extensively engaged in. Particulars of the fun have not reached us, but we heard enough yesterday to indicate that the amusement was general. A small, tallow-faced individual, named Ray, after emptying five chambers of a navy-six at one Burton, was gently lifted from the earth by the latter, who picked him up by the ankles and completely "wore him out" against the depot platform. 




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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 28, 1877. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-12-28/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [December 28, 1877] -

An Irishman, named Kilhoy, with a "drop of the craythur" too much, tried to put the contents of a shooting iron into John Middleton, whereupon John "went in on his muscle" and drove Kilhoy one just over the right eye, producing a beautiful abrasion of the scalp, and causing Kilhoy's skull to gleam out brightly in the soft light of a Christmas evening. Kilhoy was still more unfortunate, however, as shortly afterwards, he was plunged by a stray bullet which passed under his collar-bone, producing a dangerous, and in all probability, fatal wound. There have been no arrests yet, but the matter will be investigated. 




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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 28, 1877. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1877-12-28/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [December 28, 1877] -

Last Thursday a difficulty occurred between Jack McCall and Isaac Moore, both residents of this vicinity, in which Moore received an ugly cut in the back from a pen-knife in the hands of McCall. The dispute arose about some corn; angry words were followed by Moore's throwing a mallet at McCall, when the latter used his pen-knife with the result above stated. Moore's wound is about four inches long and two deep, and is not dangerous. Judge McClure issued warrants for both the parties. Before their execution, however, McCall surrendered himself to the Sheriff, and gave bond in the sum of $250 for his appearance at the examining trial which is set for next Monday. 





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Excerpt from "Local Brevities." The Courier Journal, Stanford, KY. January 31, 1878. Page 4. Newspapers.com.

[PULASKI][January 31, 1878] -

In Somerset, Ky., Tuesday morning, a negro boy aged eight years attacked another colored youth aged ten, with a knife, and stabbed him seven times in the back. One of the wounds is regarded as very dangerous. 


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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 1, 1878. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1878-02-01/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [February 1, 1878] -

IRISHMEN'S FUN WITH BLOODY RESULT.

Last Saturday evening two Irishmen named James McCurg and James Dolan, being in town, managed to get on the outside of considerable quantity of the "apple that is jack," and left for home in a decidedly "weaving way" about 5 o'clock. They live at Pine Hill. Whether they lost their way is not certain; but about midnight they visited a disreputable bagnio, kept by Mary Lantern, a mile or so from town. The place is usually called "Scuffle," and the name may have inspired McCurg, who shortly after his arrival was seized with a desire to exhibit his pugilistic accomplishments. He invited Dolan to go out in the yard and have a tussle, but the latter refused to go. McCurg then went out himself and seizing a rock, rushed at Dolan who met him at the door with a pistol drawn. He threw the rock which missed its aim, and at this juncture Dolan began to use his Smith & Wesson with some effect. Three shots in rapid succession were fired, two of which struck McCurg, but did not succeed in tumbling him. "The next thing after the firing that I saw," related the prosecuting witness "was Dolan a lyin' on his back and McCurg a settin' on Dolan." It was then discovered that McCurg was wounded. One ball entered his back near the spinal column, ranged around and striking the hipbone, passed down through the thigh and lodged in the left groin; the other passed through the hip, both of them making flesh wounds. Dolan came for a physician at daylight next morning, who went and dressed McCurg's wounds. Yesterday McCurg was moved home, and Dolan arrested and tried for the offense. The foregoing facts were elicited at the trial. He was held to answer at the Circuit Court in a bond of $250, which he gave without trouble. Both of these men are clever fellows, and have always been friends. They regret the difficulty and circumstances which brought it about. It is to be hoped that they will learn a valuable lesson from it. They admit that drinking that stuff which makes fools of the wisest was the sole cause of the difficulty. Now, let them quit drinking. It's time they did, McCurg's wounds are not considered dangerous.



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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 5, 1878. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1878-04-05/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [April 5, 1878] -


SHOOTING AFFRAY.

Rumor reach us of a shooting affray which occurred at Livingston, last Saturday, in which a man named Burton, received a severe flesh wound from a pistol shot in the thigh, and a slight wound in the hand. Another party was also wounded in the hand. We have been unable to get at the particulars. Burton's wound is not considered dangerous, and at last accounts he was doing well. []




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http://kentuckyexplorer.com/nonmembers/00-06043.html four non-fatal? fights in 1878 citing Louisville Commercial issue December 31, 1878

[PULASKI and LINCOLN]

"March 1878, 5th - John Park (colored) stabbed George Franklin (colored) at Somerset; quarrel."

"May 1878, 25th - Enoch Wolsey, Jr. shot John Muse at Somerset for talking about him."

"October 1878, 8th - ______ Catron shot _____ Lewis at Somerset; family quarrel."

"December 1878, 26th - Stewart Myers and the Carson brothers met at Crab Orchard, and after exchanging angry words, drew their pistols and commenced firing at each other. Both sides were reinforced, and some 30 or 40 shots were exchanged, shotguns taking a prominent part. Myers fell, his shoulder literally shot to pieces. Dave Carson was also severely wounded, while a number of others were more or less hurt."


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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County News." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 16, 1878. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1878-08-16/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [August 16, 1878] -

NOT DEAD, BUT BADLY WOUNDED.

Young Griffin, who was shot in the melee at Ballard's store last week, is not dead, as reported in the Courier-Journal. Neither was he shot by T. J. Ballard, but by a young man named Rose. Griffin's wound is serious, but there are well grounded hopes of his recovery. 



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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 20, 1878. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1878-12-20/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [December 20, 1878] -

ANOTHER DIFFICULTY.--It does look as if the country was going to the devil sure enough. Every week we have something criminal to record. Last Thursday, at Livingston, John Brumback and Dillard Brumback, brother, attacked George Thompson, with drawn pistols, and leveling them at his head, swore, "by the wine Gods," if he did not swallow some charges he had made against them, they would blow the top of his head off. Whether Thompson "swallowed" or not, we don't know, but he finally induced them to put up their pistols, after which, he procured a shot gun and with the assistance of two or three persons, he arrested the Brumbacks. Their trial is set for Thursday of this week. It appears that Thompson had accused the Brumback's of robbing his store, and they had since been arrested on the latter charge.



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Excerpt from "Rockcastle County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 5, 1879. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1879-09-05/ed-1/seq-3/

[ROCKCASTLE] [September 5, 1879] -

There was a shooting affray on Skaggs' Creek last Sunday. A man named Cobb was one of the participants, and was wounded in the left thigh. We did not learn the name of the man who shot him. Warrants were issued for the arrest of the parties.





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