May 2, 2015

Various Non-Fatal Shootings, Affrays, and Other Criminal Incidents, 1880s

Previously:

Click here for a list of my other Pulaski/Rockcastle/Laurel County KY articles

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The clippings below are non-fatal incidents (as far as I know) that reportedly took place in either Pulaski, Rockcastle, or Laurel county. I've clipped all these over time because I've found it to be a helpful research aid so I don't have to backtrack if I later come across an article that says, for example, someone died of a gunshot wound. I know it's not the most efficient way to do things, but it works for me.

In keeping with other posts on this blog, I'm going to organize these by decade. This list/collection is hardly comprehensive and is a work in progress. I plan to continue to update these posts as if they were still just the file on my harddrive, except now they're public. This means that future updates will only be denoted by a change of date on the next line. 

Last updated: 1/7/2017


See also:
Various Non-Fatal Shootings, Affrays, and Other Criminal Incidents, 1880s


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[] Excerpt from "Rockcastle County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 27, 1880. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-02-27/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [February 27, 1880] -

Last Saturday morning David Henderson, a quiet, peaceable citizen, was attacked in town near the mill by James Brown, who was drinking at the time. Brown struck Henderson once or twice with his fist, when Henderson knocked him down and bruised him considerably. Henderson surrendered himself into the custody of Judge McClure and Brown surrendered to 'Squire Mullins. []






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[] Excerpt from "Rockcastle County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 27, 1880. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-02-27/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [February 27, 1880] -

Saturday afternoon in J L. Joplin's grocery a difficulty arose between John Payne and Garrard Thompson, two boys aged about 17 years respectively. Payne was drunk and began to curse and abuse Thompson. He then struck Thompson once or twice with his fists and was advancing on him, when Thompson pushed him back, drew his little pistol and fired. The bullet, luckily, missed its aim and no harm was done. The parties were at one arrested by Judge McClure. At their trial on Monday they were fined $2.50 each for an affray, and Thompson was required to give bond of $100 to the Circuit Court to answer the charge of carrying concealed deadly weapons. []





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[] Excerpt from "Pulaski County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 5, 1880. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-03-05/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [March 5, 1880] -

A few days ago a difficulty occurred south of here on the line of the railroad between one Inman, of Whitley county, and Crate Owens, a desperate character of this [Pulaski] county, in which Owens received two pistol shots, one in the shoulder and the other in the abdomen--either may prove fatal. He was arrested and brought to town by Mr. D. C. Heath and is now in jail. He appears perfectly careless of his wounds. []





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[] Excerpt from "Rockcastle." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 23, 1880. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1880-07-23/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [July 23, 1880] -

They came near having a little h-ll at Pine Hill last Sunday. Eld. A. J. Pike was holding religious services in the school-house, which is used for a church at that place. Jack McCall and John Mullins, two young men, engaged in a quarrel a few steps from the church. Their words became exceedingly hot, the lie was passed, an attempt made to draw weapons, and the meeting suddenly adjourned in much confusion. Eld. Pike, who is a magistrate, J. S. Calloway, another magistrate, and Bob Adams, a constable, undertook to arrest the belligerents. They partially succeeded, and Wm. McClure, Jr., a friend of McCall's, was also arrested. Calloway tried to search McClure, at which he complained, broke from the officers, struck Calloway with his fist, and he and McCall both refused to surrender. callow went to Crooke's store, procured some double-barrel shot-guns and pistols, armed himself and posse, and returned to the church, McCall surrendered, and McClure, who had been advised by friends, had mounted his mule and started home. He was called on to halt, and failing to comply, Calloway emptied both barrels of his shot-gun and one chamber of a pistol at him. The mule was struck in several places by the shot. McClure rode back to the crowd, while they were firing at him, and surrendered to Mrs. Susie Mullins. He and McCall then gave bonds for their appearance on Tuesday. Their trial was postponed till to-morrow (Saturday), and Calloway and a man named Green, who have been arrested for unlawful shooting, will be tried at the same time. The affair created just enough excitement to afford a most welcome relief to the monotony which had been prevailing in the county since the last man was killed. []



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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 4, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-03-04/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [March 4, 1881] -

-- CRIME. -- The peace, so sweet and welcome, which had long pervaded our county, was rudely broken last week. Last Thursday, Mr. Larkin Bird, a bald eagle from Jackson county, came into Livingston with his tail feathers turned the wrong way. Before leaving his aerie in the cliffs of Chinquepin, he had devoured two or three wild cats and filled his tank with choice moonshine. At Livingston he amused himself by cursing everybody he he met, and by firing off his pistol, a sort of baby cannon, over the heads of several individuals. He called himself a "skinner" and was spoiling for a fight. Finally he ran across Brock Graves and invited him  to salute a certain portion of his anatomy. Brock declined the invitation, but attempted to break the eagle's head with a club. The blow sent Mr. Bird to the ground, but he came up pistol in hand. Mr. Graves, seeing the game, drew his Smith & Wesson and peppered the feathered individual so fast, that he hadn't time to return the fire. The fight lasted about ten minutes, and resulted in three wounds to Bird--one in the left arm, one in the head an another in the back just under the right shoulder blade. Bird was put to bed where he is in a fair way to recovery, and Graves surrendered to the authorities. He was tried Tuesday and acquitted......

Much of the illegal whisky sold in this county is vended at Pine Hill and Livingston. At the latter place considerable complaints  h[ave] [bee]n made against John Mullings, who [has] been running a bar room just across Roundstone from the depot. Last Saturday, A. J. Pike, a Justice of the Peace in that District, was at Livingston for the purpose of trying Brock Graves, and while there he made some inquiries about Mullings, especially whether he had been selling liquor to little boys. Mullings heard of these inquiries, and arming himself, went straightway in search of Pike. He found him at the depot and asked him if it was true that he had been inquiring about his selling whisky. Pike responded that he had. Mullings said, "By G-d, he didn't like it." Pike then told him that it was his duty as a public officer to investigate offences, and that he proposed to discharge his duty and no man could intimidate him. Mullings made an attempt to draw his pistol, when Pike seized him, and called upon him to surrender his weapon. Mullings resisted and in the struggle got out his pistol. He fired twice, striking Pike in the arm and breast. The ball in the arm made only a flesh wound. The bullet which struck in the breast was resisted by the breast bone and turned to the right, lodging under the skin in the side. After being shot, Pike pushed Mullings off the depot platform, jumped on him and would probably have killed him, had not Judge McClure, who reached there about that time, separated them. Pike had no weapons. The pistol with which Mullings did the shooting was an ugly three-inch barrel "Bull Dog," number 44 in calibre. Judge McClure found a large navy strapped round his body. His evident purpose was to assassinate Pike, and but for the fact that his pistol was a trifling weapon, he would have succeeded. Pike's wounds were dressed by Dr. W. P. McKee, who was present. They are painful, but not serious. Mullings was brought to town and placed in jail. On the way Pike's friends, greatly enraged, attempted to kill him, but were prevented by Judge McClure. He is now in jail and will have his trial Saturday. It is generally hoped that he will not escape the lunatic asylum...

Last Sunday evening a difficulty occurred in Laurel between Johnnie Ross, a railroad man, and Pete Broughton, which resulted in Broughton's receiving a severe wound in the side from a pistol in the hands of Ross. []


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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 11, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-03-11/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [March 11, 1881] -

John Mullings was tried last Monday before Justices J. S. Calloway and M. E. Mullins, for the malicious shooting and wounding of A. J. Pike. He was defended by Mr. F. H. Reppert. The Court held him to answer in a bond of $1,000 at the Circuit Court. They also required him to give bond in four misdemeanor cases at $100 each. Failing to execute the bonds, he was placed in jail. On Tuesday an order was made by Judge McCure, transferring him to the Stanford jail for safe keeping, and he was accordingly taken there by Sheriff W. H. Albright and two guards. Pike, the man who was shot, is rapidly recovering. []






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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 29, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-04-29/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [April 29, 1881] -



Miss Nannie Estes, erstwhile a damsel of Livingston, but more recently a resident of Lexington and Danville--between which two places she was accustomed to share the poetry of her presence--went down Monday evening to visit her old haunts at Livingston. She wore city airs in profusion and was doubtless intoxicated with visions of innumerable conquests, though it is urged that she was, also, carrying some liquor under her corset. It seems that some peculiar people in the village by the river entertain a foolish prejudice against that class of females of which Miss Nannie is proud to acknowledge she is about one half dozen of whom, and that night she was visited by a crowd of persons, whether male or female the writer knoweth not, disguised as ku-klux, who gave her strict orders to betake herself from the vicinity with the disappearance of the darkness. It is even said that Miss Nannie was [badly?baldly?] whipped by her visitors, but is hoped that they did not so disgrace themselves. But, howe'er that be, the young lady concluded not to remain in a place where her charms were so rudely appreciated, and she accordingly departed on Tuesday morning's train to seek again the companionship of her sisters in scarlet at the capital of "Little Britain." []



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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 5, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-08-05/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [August 5, 1881] -

Pete Goff, of Livingston, has got into trouble again. He shot at a man in Laurel county last week, and a warrant for his apprehension has been issued. []


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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 5, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-08-05/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [August 5, 1881] -

Bill Prewitt and Dave Bethuram had a row over a voter in the Court-House last Monday. Hot words were passed, friends rushed in and about twenty men were rushing wildly about with pale faces and hands on their pistols, but the disturbance was quieted down before any body was hurt..... 

In the Glades, John Laswell struck Bill Roberts with a rock, and Roberts would have killed Laswell but for the fact, as he afterwards said, that Laswell was his uncle and the only uncle he had in the world...... 

In Skagg's Creek, Pleas. Collier and Henry Brown said some hard words to each other. Brown finally drew his pistol, and Collier ran.... At the river, fifteen or twenty negroes, who are employed on the railroad extension, voted the Republican ticket. They had been in the precinct only a few days. []



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[] Excerpt from "Pulaski County." The Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 5, 1881. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84038328/1881-08-05/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [August 5, 1881] -

Very little excitement prevailed at the election yesterday, except that occasioned by a few boobies, who had taken too much of Kentucky's pride. Sol Turpin and Bill Singleton, famous for their patriotism when drunk, had a row at the polls over a negro, the one wanting him to vote for Beatty (Democrat), the other for Parker (Republican). Turpin, however, prevailed, and the negro cast his vote for Beatty. We cannot at present know for a certainty, but from what we can learn L. D. Parker, the Republican candidate for the Legislature, has a majority of from 75 to 150. []



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[] "Laurel County." The Louisville Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. September 28, 1881. Page 9. Newspapers.com.

[LAUREL] [September 28, 1881] -


LAUREL COUNTY.

A "NATIVE" SHOT IN THE NECK.

[Special to the Courier-Journal.]

PINE HILL, Sept. 27. -- Several "natives" raised quite a disturbance on Rodemer's works in Laurel county last Saturday, and an officer was summoned to quell them. In arresting them one George Moore resisted and shot at the officer, Deputy Sheriff Rowd Hardin. The latter returned the fire and Moore received a serious wound in the neck which may prove fatal. []



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[] "Pine Hill." The Louisville Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. December 6, 1881. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

[ROCKCASTLE] [December 6, 1881] -


PINE HILL.

ACCIDENTALLY SHOT BY A BLIND MAN.

[Special to the Courier-Journal.]

PINE HILL, Dec. 5. -- James Robinson was accidentally shot in the thigh to-day by his cousin Geo. Inman. The wound is not serious. Inman is blind, but has a passion for pistols. []



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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 6, 1882. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-01-06/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [January 6, 1882] -

A trial in the Quarterly Court last Monday, about a watch worth some $8 or $10, which was very warmly contested, came near resulting in a fight, after the parties left the Court-house. The lie was freely given, oaths and other wild, bad words were hurled promiscuously around, pistols were drawn, but no blood was shed. One of the most active participants made the remarkable statement that he had at one time "been right on the frontiers of hell, and he'd be d--d if he was afraid of any body." It was generally regretted that this individual had not, at this time mentioned, pitched his tent just across the "frontiers," thereby cutting off the possibility of his return. []





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[] Excerpt from "The Commonwealth." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. January 11, 1882. Page 5. Newspapers.com.

[PULASKI] [January 11, 1882] -

Jim Gragg, the Somerset desperado, has been returned to the jail at that place by a Missouri Sheriff. []



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[] Excerpt from "Pulaski County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 13, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-01-13/ed-1/seq-3/

[PULASKI] [January 13, 1882] -

The town is in a fever of excitement over the return of James Gragg from a prison where small-pox was raging. He is the youth who escaped from here not long since. Shepperd went after him, but hearing that he was in the midst of small-pox, refused to bring him back. But he hardly reached hoe before right on his heels came an officer from Missouri with Gragg. The people are very much frightened, and the doctors are doing a lively business vaccinating. Thus far no symptoms have displayed themselves. []




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[] Excerpt from "Pulaski County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 3, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-02-03/ed-1/seq-3/

[PULASKI] [February 3, 1882] -

The trial of M. T. Morgan for breaking into Hunly Singleton's house, and attempting to shoot or murder him and his sister, Miss Clara, was postponed until Saturday next on account of the failure of Attorney Miller to attend here on the 28th inst. Mr. Morgan is usually a quiet, industrious citizen, but the day previous to his outbreak he visited the devil's kitchen at this place, and imbibed pretty freely of his eye water, and on his return home his work of sin, shame and degradation was fully exhibited. No doubt but the angels of hell rejoice to see this work of destruction to soul and body move on so continuously, while Christians everywhere mourn over those fallen victims of intemperance. []





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[] Excerpt from "Pulaski County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 10, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-02-10/ed-1/seq-3/

[PULASKI] [February 10, 1882] -

M. T. Morgan's bondsmen were E. S. Gooch, J. M. Johnson, Jos. Eubanks, J. E. Padgett and Will Montgomery. The bond, we believe, was only $100. Mr. Morgan's family are here and will be well cared for. He is now a refugee from justice and we pity him indeed. Truly, the way of the transgressor is hard. []





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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 11, 1882. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-04-11/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [April 11, 1882] -

At Livingston, last Friday, George Howell shot at a fellow named Spangler, the ball just grazing Spangler's neck. Spangler is the proprietor of the floating bar-room on Rockcastle river. Howell was arrested. []




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[] "Laurel County." The Courier-Journal, Louisville, KY. May 2, 1882. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

[LAUREL] [May 2, 1882] -


LAUREL COUNTY.

ROW BETWEEN THE MOUNTAINEERS AND COLORED RAILROAD LABORERS.

[Special to the Courier-Journal.]

MT. VERNON, May 1. -- A little battle occurred at Nolenberg & Cohen's works on the Louisville and Nashville railroad, in Laurel county, Sunday evening. The combatants were natives and colored laborers.  Several received slight wounds. One negro was shot and dangerously wounded by J. Wesley Wells. The contractors have discharged all negroes in order to avert further trouble. The track layers are working five miles beyond Livingston. []



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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 12, 1882. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-05-12/ed-1/seq-2/

[LAUREL] [May 12, 1882] -

In a difficulty near Livingston, in Laurel county, last Monday, between James and John Townsend, uncle and nephew, the latter was cut several times with a knife in the hands of the former. The wounds were not serious. John Townsend was drinking, and the difficulty arose over a settlement between him and a third party in which James Townsend interfered. []




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[] Excerpt from "Pulaski County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 30, 1882. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-06-30/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [June 30, 1882] -

Bob Ham and Bob Cowan had a small fight. Ham knocked Cowan in the head with a rock and sought refuge behind a garden fence. He was dragged out, however, and fined $7.50 and costs. []



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[] Excerpt from "Pulaski County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 30, 1882. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-06-30/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [June 30, 1882] -

Sam Gragg came to town Saturday, announced his intention to take the place or spill blood in the attempt. A few war-whoops brought the officers to the scene, and Gragg was assigned rooms at Castle Shepperd for 10 days. []





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[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 8, 1882. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1882-12-08/ed-1/seq-3/

[PULASKI] [December 8, 1882] -

WAYLAID. -- Columbus C. Miller a well-known citizen of Pulaski was waylaid and brutally assaulted by the Bowyer Brothers on Monday night. Miller had accused them of killing his horse and had them arrested for it. The trial was set for Monday, but owing to absent witnesses it was continued and on returning home that night, Mr. M. was shot and beaten over the head till he was supposed to be dead. He was found by a friend and is now in a most precarious condition. The Bowyers are still at large. []






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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 10, 1883. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1883-08-10/ed-1/seq-3/

[ROCKCASTLE] [August 10, 1883] -

Champ Mullins was shot by Hiram Cox a few days since. Both parties were drinking. They got to joking each other about the election and were calling rather hard names, when Mullins, in good-humored way, patted Cox on the cheek and said, "G-d d--n you, come in and take a drink," and turned to go in the grocery, and as he stepped in the door Cox shot him in the back with a pistol supposed to be a 38 calibre. The ball took effect in the back just above the hip bone and ranged around toward the groin. The wound was probed to be the depth of about 6 inches, but the ball could not be found. Mr. Mullins is in a critical condition, but the doctors think he will recover. Cox was arrested and he waived an examination of his case. His bail was fixed at $800, and on failing to give it he was remanded to jail. []




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[] Excerpt from "Neighborhood News." Cincinnati Commercial Tribune, Cincinnati, OH. October 9, 1883. Page 3. Genealogybank.com.

[PULASKI] [October 9, 1883] -

At Somerset, Ky., three boys, Bob Easter, John Sykes, and Charles Enyard, have been arrested for playing highwaymen a la Beadle's heroes. John Enyard, upon whom they were playing the game, was seriously injured by the upsetting of his wagon, and his wife, who was with him, narrowly escaped death. []




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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 1, 1884. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1884-01-01/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [January 1, 1884] -

Jack Abney shot Alex Poteet last Thursday night. They were at a dance at Granville Adams', on Brush Creek. There had been an old grudge between them for a long time. One of them got his partner and took his position on the floor for a dance, when the other one came in and ordered him out. Abney pulled his pistol and fired at Poteet, but missed him. Squire Abney at this time rushed up and caught Poteet and held him by the arms while Jack Abney shot him twice; once through the arm and again in the breast. The shot in the breast struck a rib and glanced round toward the left side. Both wounds are dangerous, thought not necessarily fatal. Poteet was able to be brought to town Saturday. No arrests have been made yet. []




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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 15, 1884. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1884-02-15/ed-1/seq-2/ 

[ROCKCASTLE] [February 15, 1884] -

Andy Mason is in jail for worshiping God according to the dictates of his own conscience, that was with a bottle of whisky and a few shots from a pistol directed toward Alex. Poteet. His trial is set for today. He is charged with disturbing religious worship and shooting with intent to kill. []





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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 4, 1884. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1884-04-04/ed-1/seq-4/

[ROCKCASTLE] [April 4, 1884] -

John Reynolds for shooting Gentry Haggard was held under a bond of $250 for his appearance to answer any indictment that may be found against him. So far he has failed to give said bond. []





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[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 29, 1884. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1884-04-29/ed-1/seq-3/

[ROCKCASTLE] [April 29, 1884] -

A drunken bully named John Reynolds attempted to bulldoze the little town of Pine Hill Friday, but came to sudden grief. He had run several fellows off and finally shot three balls at a little German named Vander, who procured a pistol and advanced on the bully, compelling him to surrender his [w]eapon. Then he beat him over the head with his own till the bystanders satisfied that Reynolds had enough, led the irate German away. Reynolds will be a better, if not so pretty a man in the future. []






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[] Excerpt from "More Shooting, Other Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 11, 1884. Pgae 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1884-07-11/ed-1/seq-3/

[ROCKCASTLE] [July 11, 1884] -


More Shooting -- Other Local Matters.


LIVINGSTON, KY., July 10. -- Monday morning G. C. Thompson and Fred Parker got on freight train No. 32, John Harris conductor. Harris stopped and informed them they could not ride upon his train as he was not allowed to carry passengers without a special permit from Master of trains or some other authorized official. After they had gotten off a quarrel took place between Thompson and Parker and Harris and crew, then some shots were fired by Thompson and Parker and one of Harris' brakemen. One of the shots fired by the brakeman struck Thompson's revolver, splitting the ball, and one piece took effect just above the wrist in Thompson's right arm, but scarcely drew blood. Three of the shots from Thompson and Parker's pistol struck the rear end of the caboose, going through, but fortunately hurt no one. Thompson and Parker were arrested by deputy Sheriff Jas. I. White, yesterday evening and taken before justice of the peace Pike, and held over under two hundred dollars bond for their appearance at Mt. Vernon Friday. It is rumored that a writ has been sworn out for the brakeman who did the shooting. The particulars are not fully known. []



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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 22, 1884. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1884-07-22/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [July 22, 1884] -

One negro cut another very seriously with a knife at Livingston Saturday night. Dr. Lovell sewed up five of the gashes. He will probably die. The one who did the cutting is at large. []





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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 2, 1884. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1884-09-02/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [September 2, 1884] -

Thursday evening about 5 o'clock there was a shooting scrape near Pine Hill between Geo. W. Brown, Tip Langford and Wm. Bryant on side and Van Mason, John Owens and Bud Suttless on the other. The difficulty came up about some defamatory remarks, which Brown is said to have made about Mason and others in that vicinity. Mason went to Brown with his pistol drawn and told him if he had used the language attributed to him he would kill him. Brown replied that he had not used the language. Mason told him that it was all right, then, and that they would stop the quarrel where it was. Three or four hours later as Brown and his men were returning to the section house from their work, they met Mason and his party, who made demonstrations as if to fire. B[rown] and his men seized their arms and began to shoot about the same time that Mason and his party did. About twenty shots were fired in all one of which took effect in the left shoulder of Mason. The ball struck his cheek, ranged downward and entered the shoulder and came out just under the shoulder blade. The shot is supposed to have been from a needle gun in the hands of Brown. Brown is foreman on the Pine Hill section of the L. & N. railroad and was in the discharge of his duties. He came to town Friday and surrendered himself to the county judge and his examining trial was set for today. The public sympathy is with Brown, who says he will give up his position at once and not work any more on that section, as his life is in constant danger every moment he is on the works. []



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[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 5, 1884. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1884-09-05/ed-1/seq-2/

[LAUREL] [September 5, 1884] -

A difficulty occurred at London on the 3d, between William Magee and John L. Evans, resulting in Evans shooting twice at Magee, one shot taking effect in his own hand inflicting quite a painful wound, and the other cutting Magee's coat across the shoulder. Both parties were arrested, Magee upon the charge of breach of the peace and Evans upon the charge of shooting with intent to kill. Magee, upon trial was acquitted. Evans' trial is set for next Tuesday. []



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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 19, 1884. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1884-09-19/ed-1/seq-3/

[ROCKCASTLE] [September 19, 1884] -

Last Sunday a party of colored boys were returning from a game of base ball, when a difficulty came up between Bud Manuel and Wallace Lackey about some trivial matter and Bud struck Wallace over the head with a wagon standard, which they had been using as a bat. The bat was almost square and had very sharp corners. One of the corners cut a gash about three inches long and into the skull just above and a little behind the left ear. Lackey was knocked senseless for a while, but finally got up and wanted to fight again. Manuel was arrested and started to jail when he made a break for his liberty and escaped from guard and is still out. []





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[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 30, 1884. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1884-09-30/ed-1/seq-2/

[LAUREL] [September 30, 1884] -

Wm. Lankesley shot Elijah Harris in the bowels and was himself shot in the shoulder in a difficulty in Laurel county Saturday. Harris will die. []




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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department.." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 3, 1885. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-02-03/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [February 3, 1885] -

About fifteen or twenty of the best citizens of the Skagg's Creek country have been arrested, charged with kukluxing in tearing down the house of a woman, who is said to be a common prostitute. There is a good deal of feeling over the matter and there are good men on both sides. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon Department." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 10, 1885. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1885-02-10/ed-1/seq-3/

[ROCKCASTLE] [February 10, 1885] -

At the last term of the Circuit Court Elijah Cox was indicted upon a serious charge. He came up Saturday and gave himself up to the authorities, was tried and acquitted. The parties who were arrested on Skaggs Creek for kukluxing were also tried and acquitted one day last week. []



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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 3, 1887. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-06-03/ed-1/seq-4/

[LAUREL] [June 3, 1887] -

The case against William Williams for shooting and wounding Charley Baker in a boys' quarrel last October was heard and Williams acquitted. []




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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. February 8, 1887. Page 1. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-02-08/ed-1/seq-1/

[ROCKCASTLE] [February 8, 1887] -

At a rock quarry near Wildie, in this county, last Wednesday, in a fight between Ike Coffee and Moze Gatliff the latter received an ugly knife thrust from Coffee's weapon. The row came up over some coal. Gatliff had knocked Coffee down and was pounding hi when the cutting put a stop to the proceedings. []






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[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 4, 1887. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-03-04/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [March 4, 1887] -

Mark Bryant, another of the scoundrels that have brought disgrace upon the fair name of Pulaski, made a cowardly assault on a young man named Davidson at Barren Fork and killed him without any provocation whatever. He is the same who stabbed old man Bowman nearly to death recently and was never punished therefor. []




---

[] Excerpt from Column 1. Semi-Weekly South Kentuckian, Hopkinsville, KY. March 4, 1887. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069394/1887-03-04/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [March 4, 1887] -

Mark Bryant, a desperado, loaded his gun and went out to kill a man in Pulaski Monday. He met a young man named Davidson and began to abuse him, Davidson replied pleasantly and started off to avoid a fuss but with the remark, "Well, I'll shoot you anyhow." Bryant shot him dead in his tracts. []



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[] Excerpt from "Notes of Current Events." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 8, 1887. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-03-08/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [March 8, 1887] -

Saturday evening in Pulaski county, George Tartar attended unbidden a dance given at Neal Simpson's distillery and at once raised a disturbance, in which he stabbed four persons, one of whom, Bud Hutchison, is not expected to recover. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Kentucky Knowledge." Semi-Weekly South Kentuckian, Hopkinsville, KY. March 11, 1887. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069394/1887-03-11/ed-1/seq-2/

[PULASKI] [March 11, 1887] -

Geo. Tartar attended unbidden a dance in Pulaski county and raised a disturbance in which he stabbed four persons, one of them, Bud Hutchison, is expected to die. Tartar has served two terms in the penitentiary. []





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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 22, 1887. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-03-22/ed-1/seq-4/

[LAUREL] [March 22, 1887] -


Frank Dixon and Bob Burgin, two drunken Pittsburg negroes, indulged in a little shooting match Friday  night, their respective black carcasses being the targets. Dixon received a pistol shut to wound int he right eye, the ball supposed have passed directly through his head, while Burgin got in the left breast in the region of the heart. Both are not only living but doing reasonably well, the latter at last accounts being on the lookout for a physician to patch him up. It is exceedingly fortunate that neither of these gentlemen were hit in the heel. []



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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 22, 1887. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-03-22/ed-1/seq-4/


[LAUREL] [March 22, 1887] -

News reaches me just as I close this letter, of the killing at Jellico, Saturday night, of Lee Bullard, recently of this county, by Vol. Philpot. Have been unable to get particulars. []






---

[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 25, 1887. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-03-25/ed-1/seq-2/

[LAUREL] [March 25, 1887] -


Lee Bullard, whose killing was reported in my last, is not dead, but is suffering from a fractured skull from a sledge hammer in the hands of Vol. Philpot. []




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[] Excerpt from "Local Matters." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 24, 1887. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-05-24/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [May 24, 1887] -

SHOT IN THE PULPIT. -- Sunday night as Rev. George W. Bolling, of the colored Baptist church, was warming down to his sermon, some cowardly enemy fired at him through a broken window, the ball striking him in the left arm and glancing, shaved a furrow across his back. The shot created great consternation in the congregation, but the preacher seemed but little agitated and wanted to keep on with his discourse. The ball seems to have been a very small one and to have been fired from a pistol. A table was standing by the window and the rascal got the proper elevation by standing upon it. A colored boy at a house near by saw a mulato or a white man sneak up to the building and run after the shot down the railroad. There is no clue to the would be assassin, but every effort will be made to ferret him out. Bolling has many enemies both in and out of his church. He is said to be very "bigoty" in his disposition and his methods have caused at least one big split in the church. It is also claimed that the part he took for prohibition made him other enemies, but it is hard to believe that either cause could have made anybody reckless enough to want to kill him. He is a considerable orator and in addition to his religious work, essay to be a political leader. His demand for the recognition of the colored man in the recent State republican convention will be remembered, as well as his subsequent appointment on the State Executive Committee. []



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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 31, 1887. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-05-31/ed-1/seq-1/

[ROCKCASTLE] [May 31, 1887] -

A cutting affray took place Sunday evening at Smiley's saw mill on Skagg's Creek, in which John Smiley was dangerous cut in the left shoulder and breast by a pocket knife in the hands of Willis Bussell. Bussell had been at work for Smiley, but for some cause was discharged a few days ago. On the day the cutting took place the parties had been drinking together during the day and it is supposed the discharging affair came up in their conversation, when they came to blows and resulting in the dangerous cutting as above. Officers have gone to arrest Bussell. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 10, 1887. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-06-10/ed-1/seq-3/

[ROCKCASTLE] [June 10, 1887] -

John Smiley, who received the cuts from a knife in the hands of William Bussell on Skaggs Creek a short time since, was arrested Saturday by Lee Arnold, the jailer, and trial set for Wednesday evening for his connection with the fight. Bussell has not been found. []




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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 15, 1887. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1887-07-15/ed-1/seq-1/

[ROCKCASTLE] [July 15, 1887] -

Gilbert Coffey, a young farmer living near Wildie in this county was shot and dangerously wounded Monday night by Thomas Ward, a neighboring farmer. Thomas Ward and his brother William came to this county from Ohio and bought a farm from Wiley Coffey, the father of the wounded man, and have been running the farm and cutting the timber since. Young Coffey had been working for the Wards and on Monday they were to have a settlement, but they could not agree to each other's accounts, so it was agreed by the parties to leave the settlement to two neighboring farmers, Henry Branaman and Jesse Fish. Monday night about 9 o'clock, in company with Andy Norman, he called at the house of the Ward brothers and were admitted. After talking a while the subject of the settlement came up and Coffey became very abusive when Norman took him by the arm and asked him to come with him and go home, remarking at time that had he known there was any trouble up he would not have come. Coffey became frenzied, pulled his knife and rushed at young Ward, who drew his pistol and shot at Coffey, striking him in the chin, breaking his jaw, knocking out two teeth and passing on through the root of his tongue into his neck. Norman then fled, going to a neighbor's and telling them of the shooting. No one went to the house and about midnight Coffey managed to get home, where he had considerable difficulty in gaining admittance on account of his being unable to talk and make himself known. Drs. Davis and Daniels attended the wounded man and say there is but little chance for his recovery. Sheriff White went to the scene of the shooting Tuesday, but could not find the Wards. It is thought they will come to town and surrender. []



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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 11, 1888. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-05-11/ed-1/seq-1/

[LAUREL] [May 11, 1888] -

Monday John Stringer arrested at Livingston and placed in jail here a miner from Pittsburg by the name of James Flin [Flynn]. Last Sunday while Flin's wife was absent from home he committed a rape on his own 7-year-old daughter. The cries of the little girl caused her mother to return and she told what her father had done, which enraged the beast and he knocked her down and beat her cruelly. His wife entreated for the child and was beat over the head and cut in the face. In accomplishing his hellish design he wounded the little girl so as to endanger her life and afterward beating her. After being placed in jail here a mob from Pittsburg was expected to take him out and lynch him. He was given an exam[in]ing trial before Judge Baker Tuesday and held without bail. []




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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 11, 1888. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-05-11/ed-1/seq-1/

[ROCKCASTLE] [May 11, 1888] -

Sunday, near Brodhead, Harrison Tyree, during a quarrel shot and wounded James Roberts in the leg. Roberts got his gun and fired twice at Tyree, but failed to hit him. The quarrel came up over some ducks belonging to Roberts, that had been running in a corn field of Tyree. Both are prominent farmers. No arrests up to this, Thursday morning. []




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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 15, 1888. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-05-15/ed-1/seq-1/

[ROCKCASTLE] [May 15, 1888] -

James Kitts and Joel Anglin, of the Orlando neighborhood, have been at outs for some days on account of Anglin's stock trespassing on Kitt's pasture. The parties met by accident in the woods on Saturday and after quarreling a fight followed, in which clubs were freely used Kitts left Anglin on the ground for dead and made his escape. Anglin was carried home and found to have a broken arm and rib and several contusions on the head, and is in a precarious condition. []





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[] Excerpt from "News Condensed." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. May 15, 1888. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-05-15/ed-1/seq-2/ 

[PULASKI] [May 15, 1888] -


While Samuel Troxtie and William Poore, were working in a nursery farm, near Somerset, the latter struck the former with a hoe, completely tearing the flesh from the side of his face and breaking his jawbone. []




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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. June 29, 1888. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-06-29/ed-1/seq-1/

[ROCKCASTLE] [June 29, 1888] -


James Frazer and Tom McPherson fought over a keg of beer last Saturday evening. Everything movable was used in the scrimmage for weapons. The fight was pretty even until Frazer secured a shovel, with which he laid out his antagonist. McPher[s]on was taken home in a critical condition, covered with wounds. Frazer was scratched up but little. Trial set for to-day. []




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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  October 8, 1888. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-08-10/ed-1/seq-1/

[ROCKCASTLE] [August 10, 1888] -



Mitchell Norton and --- Pitman on their way home from the election, exchanged shots as long as their cartridges held out, when Pitman struck for the timber. []



---


[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. August 31, 1888. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-08-31/ed-1/seq-3/


[ROCKCASTLE] [August 31, 1888] -

Mitchell Norton and Geo. Pitman, who exchanged several shots on election day, have been placed under bond of $100 each. []



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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  October 8, 1888. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-08-10/ed-1/seq-1/


[ROCKCASTLE] [August 10, 1888] -


No serious trouble occurred at the election here. Mat Pike and Jailer Arnold had some trouble over voting a man and came to blows. Pike fired one shot at Arnold, but did no damage. It was the most boisterous crowd that has gathered on our streets for many a day. At 1 o'clock there were 100 men and boys on the street, more or less intoxicated, attempting to fight, yelling and acting like lunatics. A veritable howling mob. By 7 o'clock they had dispersed and quiet was once more restored. []





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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY.  September 25, 1888. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-09-25/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [September 25, 1888] -


Tom Argerbright, in a row at Livingston Saturday night, sprinkled Fayette Whitley, a negro, with bird shot. []




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[] "Shot in the Chest." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. October 7, 1888. Page 4. Newspapers.com.

[ROCKCASTLE] [October 7, 1888] -


Shot In the Chest.

Mt. Vernon, Ky., Oct. 6. -- (Special.) -- Today at Roundstone, this county, in a difficulty between Walter Turpin and Chant Lair, the latter receiving four bullets in the chest from Turpin's pistol. An old grudge between the parties brought on the fight. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 12, 1888. Page 8. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-10-12/ed-1/seq-8/

[ROCKCASTLE] [October 12, 1888] -

Saturday evening at Round Stone, C. Lair and Waller Turpin, while under the influence of liquor, got into a crow. In the melee Lair received two balls from Turpin's pistol, one in the breast, which passed out through his back, the other in the thigh. Both parties have been and are yet good friends. Turpin visits the wounded man daily. Lair will probably recover. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. October 30, 1888. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1888-10-30/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [October 30, 1888] -

Chant Lair, who had his person filled with bullets by Walker Turpin some weeks since is in a precarious condition. []


---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 11, 1889. Page 1. LOC.

[ROCKCASTLE] [January 11, 1889] -

Chant Lair, who was badly shot some time since at Round Stone, is yet alive. His recovery is doubtful. []



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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. January 22, 1889. Page 4. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-01-22/ed-1/seq-4/

[ROCKCASTLE] [January 22, 1889] -


The first shooting affair on record in the Copper Creek district took place one day last week between Robert Johnson and Andrew Telfry. The parties had been at outs for some time. They met, when Tilfry asked Johnson if he was ready to whip him. Johnson replied no. Tilfry had a gun. Johnson drew pistol. Tilfry ran. Johnson fired three shots, one striking Tilfry in the arm above the elbow. Johnson fled the country. []




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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 26, 1889. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-03-26/ed-1/seq-1/

[ROCKCASTLE] [March 26, 1889] -

Joseph Ramsey, a man who had done his part of loafing, beat up Dr. Scarbrough on Skagg's Creek last Friday. The doctor is an old and respected citizen and had suffered a number of losses by thieves in the way of cabbage and other vegetables. He was satisfied Ramsey was one of the trespassers and had some time since told him of it. Writs are out for Ramsey's arrest. []




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St. Albans Daily Messenger, St. Albans, VT. March 26, 1889. Page 1. Genealogybank.com.

[ROCKCASTLE] [March 26, 1889] -


MOUNT VERNON, Ky., March 25.-- Saturday, Moses Gattiff's wife ran away with another man. Gattiff recaptured her and began beating her. James Baker remonstrated and Gattiff shot at him. Baker then shot Gattiff fatally and surrendered to the sheriff. []




---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 26, 1889. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-03-26/ed-1/seq-1/

[ROCKCASTLE] [March 26, 1889] -

Moses Gatliff, formerly of Jackson county, who of late had been mining in Laurel county, got on a bender at Sinks Saturday and after bulldozing the people there, left saying he would do the same thing for the natives at Pine Hill. He scared a number of them out of their wits, making them beg for life. His attempt to make James Baker leave the place was a failure. He drew a pistol on Baker, but that individual didn't run. Gatliff, afterwards, began beating his own wife over the head with a pistol. Baker asked him to desist; instead of doing so he fired a shot at Baker. Baker drew a pistol, which he put into use, one shot from it passing through Gatliff's breast, from right to left mortally wounding him. Baker came in and surrendered. Gatliff's wife had run off from East Bernstadt to Pine Hill with another man and it is thought that is why he was on the war path. []




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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. March 29, 1889. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-03-29/ed-1/seq-1/

[ROCKCASTLE] [March 29, 1889] -


Moses Gatliff, the man shot at Pine Hill by James Baker will probably recover. []



---

[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 12, 1889. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-04-12/ed-1/seq-1/

[ROCKCASTLE] [April 12, 1889] -

James Baker was tried here Monday for shooting Moses Gatliff at Pine Hill two weeks since. He was acquitted. []




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[] Excerpt from "News Condensed." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. April 2, 1889. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-04-02/ed-1/seq-2/

[LAUREL] [April 2, 1889] -


Minnie Gregg, alias Lizzie Lay, formerly of Pulaski, a beautiful woman of loose character, was shot and mortally wounded, at East Bernstadt. Johnce Chumley, is under arrest for the crime. --Echo. []



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[] "Bad Men Pulled." The Courier Journal, Louisville, KY. July 27, 1889. Page 2. Newspapers.com.

[PULASKI] [July 27, 1889] -


BAD MEN PULLED.


The Assailants of the Cundiff Sisters Arrested Near the Scene of Their Crime.

Somerset, Ky., July 12. -- (Special.) -- The parties who assaulted the Cundiff sisters, Tuesday night, were arrested last night by a mob of determined men. They were found lurking around in the vicinity where the foul deed was perpetrated. They were brought to this place and gave their names as Edmonds and Callahan, from Tennessee. A pistol, a couple of knives and a large bunch of skeleton keys were found on their person when arrested. Their photographs were taken to-day, and forwarded to Knoxville, as it is thought they are wanted at that place. Miss Cundiff, whom they struck in the face with a rock, is not expected to live. []



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Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 30, 1889. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-07-30/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [July 30, 1889] -



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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 30, 1889. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-07-30/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [July 30, 1889] -


Pete Huston for shooting at with intent to kill Toy Teaters, another negro, was fined $10. This makes two shootings for Saturday, which goes to prove there is yet some life in the city. []




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[] Excerpt from "City and Vicinity." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. July 30, 1889. Page 3. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-07-30/ed-1/seq-3/

[LINCOLN] [July 30, 1889] -


Jim Tall, our fighting coon, is again in jail, this time for a fuss with Will Chestnut, another negro, who shot at him some four or five times, but unfortunately missed him. Tall averages a fight a week and it matters not who commences it, he is sure to land in jail. He proves himself to be in the right this time, however, and Chestnut was fined $5 while he goes free. []






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[] Excerpt from "London, Laurel County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. September 3, 1889. Page 1. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-09-03/ed-1/seq-1/

[LAUREL] [September 3, 1889] -

Matt Steele was shot and dangerously wounded Saturday evening by Tom Province. The difficulty occurred over a settlement. They lived about five miles northeast of London. Mr. Province is a farmer and Mr. Steele runs a saw-mill. []





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[] Excerpt from "Telegraphic Summary, Etc." The Sun, Baltimore, MD. December 25, 1889. Page 1. Genealogybank.com.

[ROCKCASTLE] [December 25, 1889] -


Near Mt. Vernon, Ky., Monday night, Jas. Townsend and Itill[?] Adams fatally shot Samuel Auglin. The shooting grew out of family troubles. Auglin was Townsend's son-in-law. Townsend and Adams claim that Auglin was attacking them with a bowie knife. []




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[] Excerpt from "Mt. Vernon, Rockcastle County." Semi-Weekly Interior Journal, Stanford, KY. December 27, 1889. Page 2. LOC. http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85052020/1889-12-27/ed-1/seq-2/

[ROCKCASTLE] [December 27, 1889] -

Samuel Auglin was shot and dangerously wounded by James Townsend and William Adams Monday night near Brush Creek Station. Auglin received two wounds, one in the left wrist and one in the abdomen ranging downward. The wounded man says the parties came to his house and being refused admittance threatened his life. He stepped outside when they opened fire upon him. Townsend and Adams say they had been drinking together during the day and in passing Auglin's house they stopped on the outside while Auglin went in. After a little time Aulin was heard smashing dishes, etc. Townsend, who is the father-in-law of Auglin, went in to quiet and pacify him, when he got his gun and run Townsend fro the house, following him and Adams short distance when the firing was opened with above result. Townsend was brought here Wednesday evening. Adams has not been arrested. []


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